Department of Materials Science & Metallurgy

Past Events


26 June 2017

All day
Goldsmiths1
Postgraduate Seminars and Posters 2017

All Welcome

Please come along to Goldsmiths' Lecture Room One on Monday 26th June to hear the research talks being given by our first year PhD students (and some of the second years who were unable to present talks last year). Each presentation will last for 8 minutes, plus two minutes for questions. The talks will be chaired by members of the academic or senior postdoctoral research staff and will run for the full day, starting at about 9:30am.

And for those who are at the seminars, there will be a sandwich lunch in the Common Room, where the posters prepared by our second year PhD students will be on display.

23 June 2017

14:00 - 18:00
Cricket match - Department Social Event

Another upcoming event is the annual Staff-Student Cricket Match, which will be held on Friday 23rd June, 2pm - 6pm - venue to be finalised shortly. The student team will hopefully be mainly undergraduates. Both teams are already taking shape, but anyone who is keen to play, but not yet signed up, should contact a member of the Social Committee (staff) or Chris May-Miller <cjm220@cam.ac.uk> (students), as soon as possible. Spectators will, of course, be very welcome. Tea will be provided at about 4pm. There will be no charge, or need to buy tickets.

Tuesday 20 June

1:15 pm for 1:45 pm
Pippard Lecture Theatre, Department of Physics
Armourers and Brasiers' Cambridge Forum 2017

The afternoon programme of talks begins at 1.45 (registration from 1.15 pm) at the Pippard Lecture Theatre, Department of Physics, Cavendish Laboratory, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE. The Forum includes the award of the Armourers & Brasiers’ Materials Science Venture Prize and the 19th Kelly Lecture.

Registration is free and is now open - see www.msm.cam.ac.uk/forum
ABC Forum 2017

16 June 2017

16:00 - 18:00
On the green next to the building
Garden Party - Department Social event

The annual Dept. Garden Party will be held on Friday 16th June, at 4pm-6pm, on the lawn by the lake (Tea Room if wet). There will be sandwiches, cakes, scones & cream, strawberries, nibbles, Pimms, beer, soft drinks etc. All are welcome, including guests and children. Tickets (price £5) are now on sale at the Servery in the Tea Room. Numbers will be limited to 100, and a sizeable fraction of this number will be set aside for students (particularly Part III), so early purchase is advisable. The final deadline is Tuesday 13th June.

16 June 2017

12 noon
Goldsmiths1
DEPARTMENTAL MEETING

Prof Mark Blamire invites you to the next Departmental Meeting. Please come along and hear about the highlights of the past few months and other Department news. This is a meeting aimed primarily at Assistant and Support Staff. We look forward to seeing you there. Refreshments will be served.

Wednesday 7th June 2017

At 1.15pm (25 mins + 5 mins questions)
Goldsmiths 1
DMG Seminar: Exploring the uses of piezoelectric polymers for applications within mechanobiology

Mike Smith

26 May 2017

12:30
Jan Evetts Room
Dissolvable Tattoo Electronics for Biomedicine

Dr Huanyu Cheng, Assistant Professor at Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University

Recent advances in electronics enable powerful biomedical devices that have greatly reduced therapeutic risks by monitoring vital signals and providing means of treatment. Implantable devices can help us better understand the behavior and effects of various diseases. However, an additional procedure is required to remove the device after an initial implantation. Conventional electronics today form on the planar surfaces of brittle wafer substrates and are not compatible with the complex topology of body tissues. Therefore, stretchable and absorbable electronics are the two missing links in the design process of implantable monitors and in-vivo therapeutics. This talk presents the challenges, mechanics, and design strategies, behind a potential medical device that (a) integrates with human physiology, and (b) dissolves completely after its effective operation. Implanted devices will provide a much better understanding of organ functions and offer more time efficient treatments for serious diseases such as heart failure.

Wednesday 24th May 2017

1.15pm (25 min talk + 5 min questions)
Goldsmiths 1
DMG Seminar: Novel route to magnetoelectric coupling in epitaxial oxide films

David Pesquera

17 May 2017

2:15pm
Goldsmiths1
The Future of Oxide Electronics

Prof. T. Venkatesan, currently the Director of the Nano Institute at the National University of Singapore (NUSNNI).

15 May 2017

4 pm
Goldsmiths1
Chiral Inorganic Nanoparticles

Prof. Nick Kotov from the University of Michigan will be visiting the AIM lab on the 15th of May, 2017. Nick is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry, a Thompson Reuters Highly Cited Researcher, a MRS Fellow, and the MRS Medal winner, plus holds numerous other awards.

He will give a talk as part of his visit and all are welcome. One of the rapidly expanding fields of inorganic materials is chiral inorganic nanostructures (CNI). His talk will cover both experiment and theory of CNI starting with the origin and multiple components of mirror asymmetry of individual NPs and their assemblies. Differences and similarities with chiral structures known from other fields of chemistry will be discussed as well.

Wednesday 10th May 2017

1.15pm (25 min talk + 5 mins questions)
Goldsmiths 1
DMG Seminar: Electric-field control of magnetization and electronic transport in strain-mediated ferromagnetic/ferroelectric heterostructures

Sen Zhang

10 May 2017

13:00 - 14:00
Tea room
Lunchtime Quiz - Department Social event

Come along and put your general knowledge to the test! Enter your team to win cash prizes!

Tony Fox has kindly agreed to act as Quizmaster this time. Teams should register at the Servery/Tea Room, where the name of the team will be recorded and payment will be taken (for all members of the team). As usual, the teams should be 4-6 in size, with a payment of £2 per team member (£1 for snacks/nibbles, £1 towards the prizes). There will be a limit of about 10-12 teams, so it would be advisable to register soon - i.e. this week. Undergraduates are particularly encouraged to take part.

2 May 2017

3pm
Goldsmiths1
Structuring intuition with theory: The high-throughput way

Prof. Marco Fornari, from Central Michigan University

30 April 2017

Start times from 8am
Impington Village College
Cambridge 50 mile bike ride in aid of Prostate Cancer Research

Department members are participating a local cycle ride to raise funds for charity.

Starting and finishing on the outskirts of Cambridge, the 50 mile route ride will take them through some of Cambridgeshire's most beautiful countryside. There will be plenty of refreshment stops along the way making this an enjoyable day's cycling to raise money for Prostate Cancer Research.

You can still register to enter this event. See the website and/or speak to Harry Bhadeshia for details.
http://www.bike-events.co.uk/Ride.aspx?id=595

Friday 28th April 2017

2pm (25 min talk + 5 mins questions
Goldsmiths 1
DMG Seminar: Spin-orbit torque-based spintronic devices

Byong-Guk Park
Department of Materials Science and Engineering (KAIST)

24 April 2017

11:30
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EM Group Seminar: Structure determination by electron crystallography

Speaker: Tom Willhammar, who is visiting the EM Group for a few months from Stockholm University

28th March 2017

14:00-17:00
Goldsmiths2
“Crystallographic Orientation Mapping” using MTEX

This workshop aims to provide hands-on practical introduction to the visualisation of orientation and misorientation data in 3D orientation spaces. It is suitable for those who have acquired, or will acquire, crystallographic orientation mapping data and want to explore new ways to analyse this data. All are welcome. Please sign up in advance.

Organisers: Duncan Johnstone and Robert Krakow
Sign up here

25 March 2017

15:00-16:00
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CSF 2017: Atoms to planets: understanding planetary magnetic records using nanoscale microscopy

The Earth has a magnetic field caused by convection in its core. Over the Earth’s 4.5 billion year lifetime, its magnetic field has changed. We know this by studying tiny inclusions in magnetic rocks in the Earth's crust. The use of advanced scientific techniques is allowing us for the first time to study the tiny rare rock samples from Earth's earliest era, and to examine meteorites that have fallen to Earth. This information may be able to tell us about magnetic fields in the earliest history of the Solar System before the formation of the planets, and how planets and asteroids form and evolve over time.

Age: 12+, Talk, Arrive on time, free

25 March 2017

13:45-14:45
Goldsmiths1
CSF 2017: Communication using light

Light has been used for communication for thousands of years. This talk explores the ways that light can be used to transmit information, from sending data along optical fibres, using lasers to encrypt secret online data, to new technologies like Li-Fi, which uses light as a secure digital means of communication.

Age: 12+, Talk, Arrive on time, free

25 March 2017

13:00-16:00
Goldsmiths2
CSF 2017: Engineering atoms

Join the team from Engineering Atoms for an afternoon of hands-on activities to discover the materials used in jet engines, how we create them and what we can do to make them better!

Age: All ages, Hands-on, Drop in, free

25 March 2017

12:30 - 13:30
Goldsmiths1
CSF 2017: Nanogenerators: small power, big impact

There is presently a growing demand for electronic devices that are wireless, portable, wearable and/or implantable. Harvesting energy from ambient sources, such as vibrations and waste heat, offers a clean and competitive energy solution that goes beyond traditional power sources such as batteries that require constant replacing/recharging, and that do not scale easily with size. Energy harvesting technologies are thus vital to the development of future self-powered devices, such as ubiquitous wireless sensors. Our work involves developing highly efficient nanomaterials, often based on polymers, for energy harvesting using cost-effective and scalable routes, and incorporating these into devices that can convert motion and heat into electricity.

Age: 12+, Talk, Arrive on time, free

25 March 2017

11:15-12:15
Goldsmiths1
CSF 2017: From nature to synthesis and back again: the role of materials in medical implants

Have you ever wondered which materials are used in medical implants? Want to know how prostheses and implants have developed over time? Join us for a talk that takes you through a brief history of the materials used for medical applications and shows the achievements that have opened a myriad of possibilities for implants and prostheses in the future.

Age: 12+, Talk, Arrive on time, free

25 March 2017

10:30....12:00....
University Sports Centre, Sports Hall
CSF 2017: The science of ice cream - LIMITED TICKETS AVAILABLE ON THE DOOR

Ever wondered how ice cream was invented, and why it's so delicious? Believe it or not, it takes a lot of science and engineering to keep a material made of solid, liquid and gas from falling apart, with the added challenge that the liquids in ice cream don't want to mix! This talk is all about the scientific wonder that is the world's favourite dessert; researchers from the Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy explore its history, its fascinating materials properties, and we make sixty litres of ice cream live for the audience using the amazing cooling power of liquid nitrogen!

Age: 8+, Talk, Arrive on time, free

LIMITED TICKETS ON THE DOOR

25 March 2017

10:10 - 11:00
Goldsmiths1
CSF 2017: Come fly with us: a tour of jet engine materials

The jet engine is a tough engineering environment, utilising the very best of what materials science has to offer. Efficiency requires engines to run at very high temperatures and high speeds whilst remaining lightweight. This talk looks at the key materials used to make an aircraft jet engine, and looks to what the future holds for jet engineering.

Age: 12+, Talk, Arrive on time, free

25 March 2017

10:00...11:00...12:00
Goldsmiths2
CSF 2017: Lots and lots of light bulbs! - FULLY BOOKED

Children can discuss with scientists where electricity comes from, use their muscle power to generate their own electricity and light, and colour in their own convection powered dragon, worm or snake to take home!

This workshop is aimed at at ages 4-7 (Early Years Foundation and Key Stage 1).

FULLY BOOKED.

25 March 2017

10:00-14:00
Tea Room
CSF 2017: Materials Science workshops

Drop in any time to get hands-on with a wide range of fascinating materials science, physics and chemistry experiments, for all ages.

Age: All ages, Hands-on, Drop in, free

Friday, 24 March 2017

9.30-4.00
Chem Eng
CAMatNet1: Medical Materials: Collagen Research in Cambridge

Registration is free (places limited) - please register by Wednesday 15th March 2017

For poster enquiries, please contact Ruth Cameron (rec11@cam.ac.uk) or Serena Best (smb51@cam.ac.uk)
Register via Eventbrite

Wednesday 22.3.17

1.15pm for 30 minutes
Goldsmiths 1
DMG SEMINAR - Giant reversible modulation of superconductivity in full-oxide spin valves

Angelo Di Bernardo

Wednesday 15.3.17

1.15 pm for 30 minutes
Goldsmiths 1
DMG SEMINAR - Self assembled CoFe2O4-Na0.5Bi0.5TiO3 heteroepitaxial nanocomposites: a new candidate for the magnetoelectric applications

Rui Wu

1 March 2017

18:00-19:00
Bristol-Myers Squibb LT, Dept. of Chemistry
Cambridge Philosophical Society - "Evolution in action: Materials, Design and Sustainability"

Professor Michael F. Ashby CBE FRS FREng will be giving the Honorary Fellows Lecture of the Cambridge Philosophical Society. All welcome.

(A complimentary drinks reception to follow on after the lecture will take place in the foyer to the lecture theatre for all attendees.)
Cambridge Philosophical Society

1st March 2017

14.30 to 15.00
Goldsmiths 1
DMG SEMINAR - Generalized magneto-optical ellipsometry for vector magnetometry

Patricia Riego

27 February 2017

14:00 - 16:00
SG1 Alison Richard Building, West Road, Cambridge
EXTERNAL: What's in my stuff? A workshop organised by Ethics of Big Data research group

Maria Hanson (Sheffield Hallam University)
Dr Karen Vernon-Parry (Sheffield Hallam University)

Please register online.
https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/whats-in-my-stuff-tickets-31961416457

23 February 2017

6pm tbc
Goldsmiths1
Cambridge heat of the 2017 IOM3 Young Persons Lecture Competition (YPLC)

The Cambridge heat of the 2017 IOM3 Young Persons Lecture Competition (YPLC) is an event which aims to judge the presentation skills of young Materials Scientists and their ability to communicate with a generalist audience a Materials-related topic of their choice.

We will assemble in Goldsmith's Lecture Room 1, at 6.30pm, aiming for a 6.45pm start. The speakers will give their presentations and the judges are then allowed to ask one question each. Once all of the speakers have given their lecture, we will move to the Tea Room for some light refreshments, while the judges deliberate. The judges will then join us in the Tea Room to announce the outcome and give the prizes. The event should be complete by about 8.30pm.

Speakers:

1. Michael Smith - A touch screen for cells: Exploring the uses of piezoelectric materials to interface with biology

2. Lok Yi Lee - Cubic zincblende gallium nitride for green-wavelength light emitting diodes

3. Isabella Gariboldi - Vascularizing Bone Substitute Materials: Uncovering the Role of Micro-Architecture

4. John Jarman - Light Machinery: nanoscale engineering of materials for quantum light sources

5. Helen Springbett - Single photon sources for quantum cryptography

It would be great to see as many people as possible at the Competition, to hear some excellent talks and to support the speakers.

Wednesday 22.2.17

1.15pm for 30 minutes
Goldsmiths 1
DMG SEMINAR - Developing a robust recombination contact for perovskite-silicon tandem photovoltaics

Robert Hoye

21 February 2017

3pm
Goldsmiths1
Transparent Glass and Glass-ceramics for Solar-pumped Lasers

Dr Shintaro Mizuno -- Toyota Central R&D Labs, Japan

Wednesday 8.2.17

1.15pm for 30 minutes
Goldsmiths 1
DMG SEMINAR - Superconducting triplet spin-valve on Nb/Ni/Co films

Zhuo Feng

2 February

12:00
Goldsmiths1
EM Group Seminar: Discovery and design of catalysts for sustainable technologies

Javier Perez-Ramirez, ETH Zurich

30th January 2017

4pm
Goldsmiths1
Nanogenerators for self-powered systems and piezotronics for artificial intelligence

Prof. Wang is the Hightower Chair in Materials Science and Engineering and Regents' Professor at Georgia Tech, and Director and Chief Scientist, Beijing Institute of Nanoenergy and Nanosystems, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing. He has pioneered the field of nanogenerators and piezotronics through several scientific and innovative breakthroughs, and his talk will be of interest to many in the department. Everyone is welcome.

27th January 2017

3pm
Goldsmiths1
EM Group Seminar: New Detectors for measuring probability current flow of an atomic-scale electron beam

David Muller of Cornell University will be visiting and giving an Electron Microscopy Group seminar. All welcome.

Wednesday 25.1.17

1.15pm for 30 minutes
Goldsmiths 1
DMG SEMINAR - Planar Spin-triplet Supercurrent Devices

David Gustafsson

25th January 2017

10:45 am
A&B Meeting Rooms
Research at DGIST, University, Republic of Korea and Plans for International Networking

Professor Shinbuhm Lee from DGIST, Republic of Korea. All welcome, however, space is limited.

24 January 2017

19:00-20:30
Castlereagh Room, St. John's College
CU Nanosoc talk - Nanomedicine

Prof Mark Welland, Dept. of Engineering - "The application of nano-sciences to understanding and treating of diseases"

Prof Ruth Cameron, Dept. of Materials Science - "Ice-templated scaffold for regenerative medicine"

All welcome.

Wednesday 18.1.17

1.15pm - for 30 mins
Goldsmiths 1
DMG SEMINAR - Towards functional polar domain walls in ferroelastic CaTi03

Guillaume Nataf

23 December 2016

12 noon
Tea Room
DEPARTMENT CHRISTMAS DRINKS AND NIBBLES

Professor Mark Blamire invites Department members join him for sausage rolls, mince pies and a glass of wine to mark the end of the year. All welcome.

14th December

19:30 - 23:30
Downing College (Howard Building)
Christmas Party - Department Social Event

This year's Department Xmas Party will be held in Downing College (Howard Building) on Wednesday 14th Dec. It will start at 7.30pm and finish around 11.30pm. Tickets cost £10 and will be available from the Servery in the Tea Room. People are welcome to bring guests, including children. A buffet meal will be provided, and also a welcome drink (plus there will be a cash bar). A well-known local DJ will be providing the music. The number of tickets will be capped at 90, so it's advisable to buy early, but in any event the latest date that tickets will be on sale is Friday 9th Dec.

12 December 2016

10 am
Goldsmiths1
EM Group Seminar: New Experimental Techniques for Exploring Crystallization Pathways and Structural Properties of Solids

Kenneth Harris from Cardiff University. All welcome.

12 December 2016

12:15
Goldsmiths1
DEPARTMENTAL MEETING

Prof Mark Blamire invites you to the end of year Departmental Meeting. Please come along and hear about the highlights of the year. This is a meeting aimed primarily at Assistant and Support Staff. We look forward to seeing you there. Coffee and muffins will be served.

9 December 2016

2pm
Goldsmiths2
Magnetoelastic sensors for stress and position monitoring

Prof. Evangelis Hristoforou, from the National Technical University of Athens. All welcome.

8 December 2016

3 pm
Goldsmiths1
Directed Molecular Assembly of Block Copolymers & Graphitic Carbons

Prof. Sang Ouk Kim from Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST). All welcome.

Wed 7 December 2016

1.15pm - 25 minute talks + 5 minutes of questions
Goldsmiths 2
DMG SEMINAR - Exploring bismuth compounds as light absorbing materials for solar cells

Lana Lee

5 December 2016

11 am
Goldsmiths2
Microstructural modification and texture evolution of copper during adhesive wear testing

Prof. Rafael Schouwenaars, Departamento de Materiales y Manufactura, DIMEI, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Avenida Universidad 3000, Coyoacán, 04510, México D.F.

29 November 2016

1 pm
Goldsmiths2
Force spectroscopy measurements of cellular adhesion and intermolecular binding

Professor Mark Geoghegan, University of Sheffield

28 November

10am
Goldsmiths1
EM Group Seminar: The Rise of Low Voltage Electron Microscopy for Quantum Materials Research

David Bell, Center for Nanoscale Systems, Harvard University. All are welcome to attend.

24 November

3pm
Goldsmiths1
EM Group Seminar: Multimetallic Functional Nanomaterials: From Reconfigurable Plasmonics to Catalysts

Prof. Emilie Ringe, Rice University, Houston, USA. All are welcome to attend.
Ringe Group website

Wed 23 November 2016

1.15pm - 25 minute talks + 5 minutes of questions
Goldsmiths 1
DMG SEMINAR - Semiconductor spintronics/spin-caloritronics with ferromagnetic tunnel contacts

Kun-Rok Jeon

Thursday 10th November 2016

12.30pm to 1.30pm
Goldsmiths Lecture Room 1
From Bronze Age to Iron Age - Recent Developments in Superconductivity

Prof Maw-Kuen Wu, Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taiwan

Wed 9 November 2016

1.15pm - 25 minute talks + 5 minutes of questions
Goldsmiths 1
DMG SEMINAR - Triboelectric nanogenerators as energy harvesters and their applications in motion sensing

Qingshen Jing

Thurs 27 October

1 pm
Common Room
DEPARTMENT SOCIAL EVENT - Lunch time quiz

The first Quiz of the year will be hosted by the Kevin Knowles who will assume the role of Quizmaster. Registration will be open from Monday morning (17th Oct) at the servery in the Common Room. The cost is £2 per person, which covers some nibbles, as well as entry to the Quiz. Teams comprise between 4 and 6 people. One person should pay for the whole team and register the name of the team at the servery. The deadline for registration is the morning of Wed. 26th (or earlier if the limit of 12 teams has been reached). As usual, there will be major cash prizes for the top two teams.

Wed 26 October 2016

1.15 pm - 25 minute talks + 5 minutes of questions
Goldsmiths 1
DMG SEMINAR - Infrared imaging of magnetocaloric materials

Rafael Caballero

24 October

18:00
Bristol-Myers Squibb Lecture Theatre, Department of Chemistry
EXTERNAL EVENT - Nanostructured steel: the challenge of manufacture

LARMOR LECTURE - Professor Sir Harry Bhadeshia FRS FREng, Department of Materials Science & Metallurgy, will deliver a lecture entitled "Nanostructured steel: the challenge of manufacture" at 6:00pm in the Bristol-Myers Squibb Lecture Theatre, Department of Chemistry, Lensfield Road, CB2 1EW.

Entry is Free and open to all who are interested.

Wed 12 October 2016

1.15pm - 25 minute talks + 5 minutes of questions
Goldsmiths 1
DMG SEMINAR - Group AGM

Annual General Meeting of DMG - DMG group members only.

4th October

17:00-18:30
Tea Room
Welcome reception for new graduate students - Department Social Event

A welcome reception for new graduate students.

26 September 2016

2pm
Goldsmiths1
In situ TEM

Hessam Ghassemi, Applications Scientist from 'Protochips' will give a talk covering the current line-up of TEM holders for in situ measurements and some applications. Protochips makes systems for biasing, heating, gas exposure and electrochemical testing. Protochips representatives will be available before and after the seminar for informal discussions. Please contact Giorgio Divitini for more information.

Friday 23rd September 2016

1.00pm to 4.00pm
Depart of Materials Science and Metallurgy Science
Advanced Materials Showcase - Open House

Discover our new, state of the art building at your own pace on a self-guided tour. Several research laboratories will be open, with poster displays and current researchers interactively demonstrating their transformative research across the scientific spectrum. We warmly invite you to put yourselves in the shoes of a current undergraduate and take part in a practical class. A selection of short video clips from researchers throughout the decades showcasing the dynamic nature of Materials Science will also be presented. Refreshments will be available throughout the afternoon.
Advanced Materials Showcase

21 September 2016

11am
Goldsmiths2
Computational Imaging in Atomic Force Microscopy

Thomas Arildsen of Aalborg University, Denmark, will be visiting and giving an electron microscopy group seminar. This talk will focus on the application of advanced computational methods to atomic force microscopy. All welcome.

15 August 2016

11:30 am
Goldsmiths1
Optimizing spatial resolution and minimizing beam damaging in TEM and EELS

Speaker: Ray Egerton. Ray is widely considered to be a pioneer of electron energy loss spectroscopy as well as having led the way in mechanistic understanding of beam damage in the electron microscope.

All welcome.

5 August 2016

14:30
Goldsmiths2
Bacterial Cellulose for applications in Electronics and Healthcare

Dr. Mudrika Khandelwal, Dept. of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering, IIT Hyderabad

Abstract: Bacterial cellulose is produced as a dilute and tough hydrogel of highly crystalline pure cellulose nanofibres. Owing to its properties, it has attracted applications in several areas. This talk presents the work related to utilisation of bacterial cellulose in making electronic paper and in making antifouling materials. Results on composites of polyaniline and bacterial cellulose to make a flexible conducting paper are discussed. Also, the preliminary results on imparting antimicrobial characteristic to bacterial cellulose are presented which reveal long sustained release of the microbial agent. One of the main advantages of bacterial cellulose is that it allows in situ tunability of microstructure. Methods to control microstructure, crystallinity and surface area are also discussed.

5 August 2016

14:30
Goldsmiths2
Electrospun Nanofibers for Energy and Healthcare Applications

Dr. Chandra Shekhar Sharma, Dept of Chemical Engineering, IIT Hyderabad

Abstract: Owing to their large specific surface area, tunable porosity, ease of surface functionalization, nanofibers have been a subject of immense interest to the scientific community. Among the various techniques, Electrospinning is a robust, versatile and potential scalable method for the fabrication of nanofibers from a large number of polymers for a wide range of applications. This talk will primarily focus on energy and healthcare applications of electrospun polymer and carbon nanofibers. In our group, we work with the polymers which yield glassy carbon upon pyrolysis. These carbon nanofibers are then used as high capacity anode for lithium-ion batteries. Furthermore, polymer nanofibers are also used as a carrier for hydrophobic drug with controlled and sustained release. A recent study on the use of electrospun nanofibers for feminine hygiene products will also be discussed.

3 August 2016

11am
Goldsmiths1
Analyzing Orientation Relationships with MTEX

Ralf Hielscher from the Faculty of Mathematics at TU Chemnitz.

1 July 2016

11:30
Goldsmiths1
Departmental Meeting

This is a meeting aimed primarily at Assistant and Support Staff, however, all are welcome.

30 June 2016

3pm
Goldsmiths1
Chemically Processed Inorganic Nanostructures for Energy and Health Applications

Prof Sanjay Mathur, Director of the Institute of Inorganic Chemistry at the University of Cologne in Germany

Everyone is welcome.

Wednesday 22nd June 2016

5pm for 25 minutes plus 5 minutes of questions
Goldsmiths 1
DMG Seminar: Mixed metal oxide thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition for investigating photocatalytic activities of the materials

Seungho Cho

20 June 2016

9:30am onwards
Goldsmiths1
Postgraduate Seminars and Posters 2016

All Welcome

Please come along to Goldsmiths' Lecture Room One on Monday 20th June to hear the research talks being given by our first year PhD students (and some of the second years who were unable to present talks last year). Each presentation will last for 8 minutes, plus two minutes for questions. The talks will be chaired by members of the academic or senior postdoctoral research staff and will run for the full day, starting at about 9:30am.

Posters prepared by our second year PhD students will be on display in the Common Room.

17th June

14:00 - 18:00
Trinity Field
Cricket match - Department Social Event

The student team will comprise both undergraduates and PhD/MPhil students. Both teams are already taking shape, but anyone who is keen to play, but not yet signed up, should contact Alex Eggeman <ase25@cam.ac.uk> (staff) or Jimmy Campbell <jc682@cam.ac.uk> (students), as soon as possible.

Spectators will, of course, be very welcome. Tea will be provided at about 4pm. There will be no charge, or need to buy tickets.

16 June 2016

2 pm
Goldsmiths1
Bond-Orientational Order in Metallic and Colloidal Glasses Measured by Limited-Volume Electron and X-ray Diffraction

Amelia Liu, Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy

16 June 2016

11am
Goldsmiths1
Solute re-distribution in irradiated Zr alloys: combining DFT and experiments

Dr. Patrick Burr, Lecturer of Nuclear Materials at the University of New South Wales

Wednesday 15th June 2016

5pm for 25 minutes plus 5 minutes of questions
Goldsmiths 1
DMG Seminar: Voltage control of magnetization in continuous and patterned Nickel films on ferroelectric PMN-PT

Massimo Ghidini

14 June 2016

11:30am
Goldsmiths1
Recent applications of sub 20meV monochromated STEM-EELS: from phonons to core losses in real and momentum space

We are delighted to welcome Quentin Ramasse, Director of the EPSRC National Facility for Aberration Corrected STEM (SuperSTEM), to deliver an EM Group Seminar. All are welcome to attend.

13 June 2016

11am
Tea Room
Annual Part II and Part III Prize Giving

There will be a short ceremony for the presentation of medals and prizes to our Part II and Part III students on Monday 13th June. The department teaching prizes will also be awarded then.

Please come along to congratulate the students on their examination results.

10th June

16:00 - 18:00
On the green next to the building
Garden Party - Department Social Event

Tickets are now on sale at the Servery in the Tea Room. There will be sandwiches, cakes, scones & cream, strawberries, nibbles, Pimms, beer, soft drinks etc.

All are welcome, including guests and children. The final deadline to purchase a ticket is Tuesday 7th June.

Wednesday 1st June 2016

5pm for 25 minutes plus 5 minutes of questions
Goldsmiths 1
DMG Seminar: Low cost Chemical synthesis of Piezoelectric and Ferroelectric Nanowires for Energy Harvesting Applications

Anuja Datta

17 May 2016

11am
Goldsmiths2
EM Group seminar: Pushing the limits of analytical electron microscopy with data science

Francisco de la Pena

Developments in the application of data science in electron microscopy. This work is very much linked with the development of the open source Python library HyperSpy (www.hyperspy.org), which has been developed by Francisco and others to aid analysis of multi-dimensional data.

13 May 2016

11am
Goldsmiths1
EM Group seminar: From Atoms to Planets: Understanding Planetary Magnetic Records Using Nanoscale Microscopy

Joshua Einsle

Wednesday 11th May 2016

5pm for 25 minutes plus 5 minutes of questions
Goldsmiths 1
DMG Seminar: Template-assisted hydrothermal growth of aligned zinc oxide nanowires for piezoelectric energy harvesting applications

Canlin Ou

10 May 2016

11am
Goldsmiths1
Alloy design by multi-objective combinatorial optimisation: physical metallurgy, thermodynamics, data mining and genetic algorithms

Prof Franck Tancret, Professor, University of Nantes, France

2 May

11 am
Goldsmiths1
EM Group seminar: Atomic-resolution studies of materials by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

Ondrej Krivanek (Nion Co. and ASU)

28th April

1-2 pm
Tea room
BBQ - Department Social Event

Department BBQ - Tickets available from the Tea Room

Wednesday 27th April 2016

5pm - 25 minutes plus 5 minutes of questions
Goldsmiths 1
DMG Seminar: Magnetoelectric coupling between (1) magnetic films on ferroelectric substrates and (2) ferroelectric films on magnetic substrates

Jing Wang

27 April

4pm
Goldsmiths2
Steering AlN as a modern technology relevant semiconductor material

Professor Anelia Kakanakova

This seminar will cover some of her most recent results on the doping of Al(Ga)N and also consider future opportunities of developing graphitic AlN.

21/04/2016

Presentation at 6:30 pm, light refreshments from 6:00 pm
Goldsmiths 1
CAMSoc talk: Silk - the physics behind the function

Speaker: Dr. Peter Laity, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield

Abstract:
Silks are natural, protein-based fibres, produced by many arthropods. The webs produced by spiders are well-known, exhibiting remarkable - even legendary - mechanical properties; fibre from cocoons of the domesticated silkworm (Bombyx mori) forms the basis of the silk textile industry. Nevertheless, similar fibres are also produced by many other insects and myriapoda (centipedes and millipedes). Although the composition, production and function of the fibres may differ significantly between the various animals, there is a key characteristic that distinguishes silks from other fibres. In all cases, aqueous protein precursors are prepared in special glands within the body, then rapidly converted to filaments by extrusion 'on demand', under ambient conditions, for use outside the body. By comparison, the various types of hairs are grown continuously, but relatively slowly. This talk will describe the diverse properties and uses of silks in the natural world and explore the science underlying the remarkable behaviour. The talk will finish with a summary of the work we are doing in Sheffield to understand this family of remarkable materials.

6 April 2016

11:30am
Jan Evetts Room
On the formation of grooves and ledges in gamma prime / gamma interfaces

Prof Gunther Eggeler form the Ruhr-Universität Bochum

1st April

11am
Goldsmiths1
Nanoscale chemical imaging by soft X-ray spectro-microscopy and spectro-ptychography

Prof Adam Hitchcock (McMaster University, Canada)

17/03/2016

9:30-3:30
Goldsmiths' 1
In-situ TEM sample-management solutions Workshop

DENSsolutions and LOT Quantum Design with guest speakers

Wednesday 16th March 2016

5pm: 25 mins talk + 5 mins of questions
Goldsmiths 1
DMG Seminar:Self-assembled heteroepitaxial nanocomposite-based resistive switching device with high and tunable on-off ratios, forming-free behaviour and high endurance

Seungho Cho

Wednesday 2nd March 2016

5pm: 25 mins talk + 5 mins of questions
Goldsmiths 1
DMG Seminar: Towards magnetic graphene: induced magnetism in exfoliated graphene via proximity effect with yttrium iron garnet thin films

Mario Amado Montero

Tuesday 1 March 2016

18:00 to 20:30
Goldsmiths 1
CAMSoc talk: A Match Made in Heaven: Materials Science and Archaeology in the studies of Invention and Innovation of the Earliest Eurasian Metallurgy

Dr. Miljana Radivojevic
Anniversary Research Fellow, McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research

The invention of pyrotechnologies able to create new materials such as ceramics, metals, glazes and glass remains a scholarly obsession as well as a fundamental building block in regional and global archaeological narratives. Pyrometallurgy in particular attracted scholarly attention as the first transformative technology of the human past. The recognition of the fact that the metal extracted from ores in no way resembled its original source material increased humanity's understanding of the surrounding environment, and consequently, dramatically developed the ability to manipulate it. The c. 7000 years old evidence for copper smelting from Belovode, a Vinca culture settlement in eastern Serbia opened new avenues in pursuing the origins of Eurasian metallurgy at a location remote from the Near East, a traditional heartland of metallurgy. The "how and why" of this invention is investigated through microstructure, composition and provenance analyses of a selection of copper minerals and metal production evidence: ores, slags, slagged sherds and metal droplets recovered from seven settlements in Serbia and Bosnia and Herzegovina, altogether spanning from the late 7th to the late 5th millennium BC.

The presentation will commence at 6:30 pm, with light refreshments from 6:00 pm. These talks are open to anyone with an interest in the topic. Further information available from Ismael Moreno-Gomez.

26 February

3pm
Goldsmiths2
Search for New Nanomaterials for Piezotronics and Nanogenerators

Dr Max Migliorato, University of Manchester

25 February

2pm
Goldsmiths1
Quantitative Characterisation of Catalyst Nanoparticles using STEM

Dr Katherine MacArthur (Ersnt Ruska Centre, Forschungszentrum Jülich)
http://www-hrem.msm.cam.ac.uk/events

Tuesday 23rd February

2 pm
Goldsmiths 1 Lecture Theatre
FROM TOPOLOGICAL INSULATORS TO QUANTUM ANOMALOUS HALL EFFECT

Dr Cui-Zu Chang

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory

The quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect can be considered as the quantum Hall (QH) effect in the absence of an external magnetic field, which can be realized by breaking time reversal symmetry in a topologically non-trivial system. A QAH system carries spin-polarized dissipationless chiral edge transport channels without external energy input, hence may have huge impact on future electronic and spintronic device applications with ultralow-power consumption. The many decades quest for the experimental realization of QAH effect received a boost in 2006 with the discovery of topological insulators (TIs). In 2013, the QAH effect was observed in thin films of Cr-doped TI for the first time. In 2015, a near ideal system in V-doped TI, contrary to the expectations from first principle calculations, was demonstrated to show an extremely high-precision QAH quantization with more robust magnetization and a higher Curie temperature. In this talk, I will introduce the route to the experimental realization of the QAH effect in above- two systems, and will discuss the zero magnetic field dissipationless edge mode and the origin of dissipative channels in the high-precision QAH state. Finally, I will outline the prospects and the barriers of a viable QAH-based device.

Thursday 18th of February

18:00 to 20:30
Goldsmiths 1
CAMSoc talk: Smart infrastructure and construction - the challenges and opportunities for the use of sensors in monitoring infrastructure and construction

Abstract: The rapid development of sensing technology and data analytics presents exciting new opportunities across a range of engineering disciplines. The aerospace and automotive industries are already well known for their early adoption of these technologies, but uptake in the infrastructure and construction industries has been slower. That is now starting to change, and the Cambridge Centre for Smart Infrastructure and Construction (CSIC) has been leading in implementing these solutions. Jennifer Schooling, Director of CSIC, will outline some of the exciting deployments on major infrastructure projects including Crossrail, Network Rail and the National Grid power tunnels, and how these new approaches are revolutionising the way we design, deliver and manage our assets.

The presentation will commence at 6:30 pm, with light refreshments from 6:00 pm.

Further information available from Ismael Moreno-Gomez.

These talks are open to anyone with an interest in the topic.

Wednesday 17th February 2016

5pm: 25 mins talk + 5 mins of questions
Goldsmiths 1
DMG Seminar:Superconducting Spin Switch with Infinite Magnetoresistance in a FI/S/FI structure

Yi Zhu

15 February

1-2 pm
Mixing Materials Science and Entrepreneurship to Commercialise Anti-Counterfeiting Technology Successfully

Dr Adrian Burden, Technical Director, Key IQ Ltd.

The talk will provide a case study about how researching micro- and nano-composites of magnetic material led to an anti-counterfeiting system that was spun out of the Institute of Materials Research & Engineering in Singapore. The startup went on to deliver its first products in Asia, raising Angel and Venture Capital Finance along the way before being sold to a larger multinational. The story will look at the various stages of the company’s growth from R&D to manufacturing and from patent protection to sales, highlighting some of the key lessons learnt about the process. The presentation will also consider how the materials technology was developed given the financial and resource constraints faced as a small medium enterprise.

10-11 February 2016

All day
Moller Centre, Churchill College
EXTERNAL EVENT - Winton Meeting: Caloric Materials

The Winton Meeting on Caloric Materials will take place in Cambridge on 10-11 February 2016, under the auspices of the Winton Program in Cambridge, APL Materials and Adande Refrigeration . It follows on from a Discussion Meeting at the Royal Society (London) entitled "Taking the temperature of phase transitions in cool materials", 8-9 February 2016.

The program for both meetings will include magnetocaloric, electrocaloric and mechanocaloric (elastocaloric and barocaloric) materials and cooling (heat pump) devices.

Organised by X. Moya, S. Kar-Narayan and N. D. Mathur Department of Materials Science, University of Cambridge
Event website

8 - 9 February 2016

All day
The Royal Society, London
EXTERNAL EVENT - Taking the temperature of phase transitions in cool materials

Scientific discussion meeting organised by Professor Neil Mathur, Dr Xavier Moya and Dr Sohini Kar-Narayan

Large thermal changes can arise when phase transitions are driven by magnetic fields, electric fields, or stress fields. These three effects arise in overlapping sets of materials, but have traditionally been studied separately. This meeting will promote scientific cross-fertilisation, and assess the potential of the materials for practical cooling applications.

Recorded audio of the presentations will be available after the event and the papers will be published in a future issue of Philosophical Transactions A.

This event is intended for researchers in relevant fields and is free to attend. There are a limited number of places and registration is essential.
Event website

Wednesday 3rd February 2016

5pm: 25 mins talk + 5 mins of questions
Goldsmiths 1
DMG Seminar:Catalyst engineering in VLS III - V nanowire growth

Yonatan Calahorra

2nd February

6.30-8pm
Rayleigh Seminar Room, Maxwell Building, West Cambridge
EXTERNAL EVENT - CUNanoSoc - 'The Fascination of Carbon Nanotubes'.

Speakers:

Prof. Tim Wilkinson (Engineering) - ‘Carbon Nanotube/Liquid Crystal Devices’
Dr. Thurid Gspann (Materials Science) - ‘Carbon Nanotube Fibres –Yarns between the Extremes’

Snacks and drinks following the talk.

28th January 2016

6 pm
Goldsmiths 1
Local heat of the IOM3 Young Persons Lecture Competition (in conjunction with CAMSoc)

Come and join us for an evening of interesting lectures.

Light refreshment will be provided after the talks.

28th January

1-2 pm
Tea room
Lunchtime Quiz - Department Social Event

The second Quiz of the year will be held on Thursday 28th January, starting at 1pm (and lasting just under an hour). Alex Eggeman will be the Quizmaster. Registration will be open from the morning of Friday 22nd January at the servery in the Common Room. The cost is ?2 per person, which covers some nibbles, as well as entry to the Quiz. Teams comprise between 4 and 6 people. One person should pay for the whole team and register the name of the team at the servery. The deadline for registration is the morning of Wednesday 27th. As usual, the number of teams will be capped at about a dozen, so it would certainly be best to register early. There will be major cash prizes for the top two teams.

Wednesday 20th January 2016

5pm - 25 mins talk plus 5 mins of questions
Goldsmiths 1
DMG Seminar: Solution Processed Nanostructures: Growth and Properties for Energy and Memory Applications

Anuja Datta

18/01/2016

2pm
Goldsmiths' 1
Exploring the world with high angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD)

Ben Britton,Department of Materials, Imperial College London
http://www-hrem.msm.cam.ac.uk/events/index.php

7th Jan

2pm
Goldsmiths 2
Two-dimensional nanostructures as platforms for sensing and energy conversion

Prof. Bettina Lotsch from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München


Prof. Lotsch's group has been working on colloidal hybrid frameworks and developing nanoscopic porous materials for adsorption, catalysis and sensing, as well as two-dimensional solids. Her research interest also includes the chemical methodologies for inorganic and carbon-based nanosheets exhibiting size-confinement properties and tunable photonic crystals from a materials chemistry perspective.

Friday 18th December 2015

11:30am
Goldsmiths1
Departmental Meeting

This is a meeting aimed primarily at Assistant and Support Staff, however, all are welcome. Please come along and hear about the highlights of the year.

Agenda:
Departmental Update - Mark
Building Update - Nathan
Any Questions? - All

Talk by Professor Chris Pickard

Coffee and muffins will be served.

16th December

19:30 - 23:30
Downing College (Howard Building)
Christmas Party - Department Social Event

Tickets cost £10 and are available now from the servery. Guests welcome, including children (children under 6 years old are free, however, a ticket should still be obtained for them). A buffet meal will be provided, and also a welcome drink (plus there will be a cash bar). There will be live music, from "Garance and the International Jazz Sextet". The latest date that tickets will be on sale is Wednesday 9th Dec. Among the activities during the evening will be a raffle. Tickets for this will cost ?1 (obtainable up to the evening), but anyone buying their Party ticket before 1st Dec. gets a free raffle ticket with it.

Wed 16 Dec

5.00 pm (25 mins plus 5 mins Qs)
Goldsmiths1
DMG Seminar: Solution Processed Nanostructures: Growth and Properties for Energy and Memory Applications

Anuja Datta

15-16 Dec 2015

All day
Trinity Hall, Cambridge
MINERALS AND METALS PRODUCTION FROM MINE TO MARKET (in honour of Professor Derek Fray)

This conference, to be held at Trinity Hall, is devoted to scientific, technological and socio-economic aspects of the procuring, processing, separating, extracting and refining of minerals and metals and other natural resources relevant in this context.

It is dedicated to Professor Derek Fray to mark his life time contributions to and achievements in “Minerals Processing & Extractive Metallurgy”. Research students and young researchers are encouraged to attend and present their papers such that there is an excellent mix of papers from industry and academic leaders and researchers currently in the midst of original research.
www.iom3online.org/MMPMM

Wed 09 Dec

5.00 pm (25 mins plus 5 mins Qs)
Goldsmiths1
DMG Seminar: Magnetocaloric and mechanocaloric effects in Fe-Rh

Enric Stern-Taulats

26 November

11am
Goldsmiths2
Nanostructured Materials for Metal-Induced fluorescence Enhancement

Dr. Fang Xie from Imperial College London, Dept. of Materials

Early diagnosis plays an increasingly significant role in current clinical drive. Detection, identification, and quantification of low abundance biomarker proteins form a promising basis for early diagnosis and offer a range of important medical benefits. Amplification of light from NIR fluorophores by coupling to metal nanostructures, i.e. metal induced fluorescence enhancement (MIFE), represent a promising strategy for dramatically improving the detection and quantification of low abundance biomarker proteins. The enhanced fluorescence intensity due to the existence of metal nanostructures makes it possible to detect much lower levels of biomarkers tagged with fluorophores either in sensing format or for tissue imaging. The first part of my talk will focus on some recent developments of plasmonic nanostructures. I will then discuss the prepared plasmonic nanostructures in sensing application.

Wed 25 Nov

5.00 pm (50 mins plus 5 mins Qs)
Goldsmiths1
DMG Seminar: X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy - A Versatile Thin Film Analysis Technique

Mark Baker (University of Surrey)

Some fundamentals and capabilities of the technique, followed by coating/thin film case studies and new developments.

Wed 18 Nov

5.00 pm (25 mins plus 5 mins Qs)
Goldsmiths1
DMG Seminar: Advanced laser ablation techniques for the fabrication of ferroelectric and multiferroic oxide heterostructures

Devajyoti Mukherjee

18th November 2015

4 pm
Evetts Room
FOLLOWING THE SETTING OF BIO-CEMENT: Measuring mechanical toughness in-situ with neutron Compton scattering

Prof. G. N. Greaves Distinguished Research Fellow, Dept. of Materials Science & Metallurgy, Univ. of Cambridge, Laboratory of Extreme Glassy State, Wuhan University of Technology Dept. of Physics, Aberystwyth University

Bio-cements, notably glass-ionomer cements, have been in widespread use for over 40 years in dentistry and medicine. Progress in improving their mechanical properties, however, lags behind the toughness needed for permanent implants. A significant impediment to improvement has been the need to use conventional mechanical failure methods, which are necessarily retrospective. Through the novel use of neutron scattering, and also terahertz spectroscopy, fracture toughness during setting can be related to atomic cohesion from which fluctuations in interfacial configurations during chelation between glass and polymer are observed [1]. In contrast to the conventional view, we find that setting is not monotonic, but characterised by abrupt changes in the development of toughness, not previously directly detected, which provide clues to improve mechanical performance.

[1] Atomic and vibrational origins of mechanical toughness in bio-cement during setting. K.V. Tian, B. Yang, Y-Z Yue, D.T. Bowron, J. Mayers, R.S. Donnan, C. Dobo-Nagy, J.W. Nicholson, D-C. Fang, A.L. Greer, G.A. Chass and G.N. Greaves, Nature Communications 6, 8631 (2015). DOI: 10.1038/ncomms9631

18th November

1-2 pm
Tea room
Lunchtime Quiz - Department Social Event

Noel Rutter will be the Quizmaster. Registration is open now at the servery in the Common Room. The cost is £1.50 per person, which covers some nibbles, as well as entry to the Quiz. Teams comprise between 4 and 6 people. The deadline for registration is Tuesday morning (17th). The number of teams will be capped at about a dozen, so it would certainly be best to register early. There will be major cash prizes for the top two teams.

17th November 2015

6.00 for 6.30 pm (Approx. duration: 1 h 30 mins)
Goldsmith's 1
CamSoc talk: Extremely Complex Problems in Metallurgy

Tata Steel Professor of Metallurgy Sir Harry Bhadeshia Director, SKF Steel Technology Centre, University of Cambridge

Abstract : Materials science differs from the pure subjects in that it attempts problems at the level of complexity that is posed, rather than by simplification to study a narrow aspect. This raises challenges that usually involve interdisciplinary skills and myriads of non-linearly interacting variables. A second distinction is that there is a genuine yearning to validate predictions. In this lecture I will introduce the method of neural networks within a Bayesian framework, a method that is a form of mathematical modelling that can help resolve complexity whilst striving for broader solutions. I will demonstrate that the method permits the discovery of new phenomena, and the quantitative design of new materials with a minimum use of resources. At the same time, it introduces a culture in which both noise and modelling uncertainties are considered in order to realise the value and limitations of the mathematical approach. Some recent successes in the design of new materials include the -TRIP steel, a welding alloy that cancels the development of residual stress, and a nickel alloy that is cheap enough to serve in ultra-supercritical steam driven power plant.

The presentation will commence at 6:30 pm, with light refreshments from 6:00 pm.

All welcome.

Wed 11 Nov

4.45 pm (25 mins plus 5 mins Qs)
Goldsmiths1
DMG Seminar: Phase coherent charge transport in graphene/normal metal and graphene/superconductor devices

Carly Richardson

Wed 4 Nov

5 pm (50 mins plus questions)
Goldsmiths1
DMG Seminar: First principles structure prediction - from crystals (I) to interfaces (II)

(I) Chris Pickard (MSM)
(II) Georg Schusteritsch (MSM)

Tues 03 Nov

10 - 11 am
Goldsmiths1
Lennard-Jones Centre talk: Materials modeling using modern computers: from the Earth’s core simulations towards accelerated knowledge-based materials design

Igor. A. Abrikosov (Linköping University and NUST “MISIS”)
http://talks.cam.ac.uk/talk/index/62289

Tuesday 27th October 2015

2.15 pm one hour
Goldsmiths' Room 1
Nature of Glass and the Glass Transition

Professor Austen Angell
Arizona State University

“The deepest and most interesting unsolved problem in solid-state theory is probably the theory of the nature of glass and the glass transition” – so noted Nobel Laureate P. W. Anderson. In this lecture we explain the old puzzles of the liquid-to-glass transition and the complications recently introduced by new observations such as direct crystal-to-glass transitions, and liquid-to-glass transitions that appear to be thermodynamically of first order, and most recently a striking development that is the glassy-state equivalent of the discovery that ice Ih can be induced to give up its residual Pauling entropy and become a (more or less) respectable Third Law substance.

Professor C. A. Angell is well known for his many seminal contributions to our understanding of liquids and glasses, including the concept of fragility in relation to glass-forming liquids and the representation known as the Angell plot.

22nd Oct

1-2 pm
Tea room
CANCELLED BBQ - Department Social Event

Unfortunately this event has had to be cancelled. Refunds will be issued by returning your ticket to the servery.

6th October

17:00-18:30
Tea Room
Welcome reception for new graduate students - Department Social Event

A welcome reception for new graduate students.

28 September

11am
Goldsmiths1
Applications of Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) and Density Functional Theory (DFT) in Plasmonics

Dr Vicki Keast (University of Newcastle, Australia)

25 September

3pm
Goldsmiths2
Active Intelligent Glass: Large area transparent thin film thermoelectric devices for smart window and flexible applications

Dr Mazhar Bari, STREP Ltd, Dublin (a former member of this department)

TRANSFLEXTEG is an H2020 funded project to demonstrate an innovative large area distributed sensor network integrating transparent thin film thermoelectric devices and sensors for multifunctional intelligent windows for buildings and automotive applications. The intelligent glass concept is to create a self-powered window that measures and communicates air quality and environmental parameters such as temperature, sun radiation and humidity using:. 1)Large area high performance transparent thermoelectric thin films deposited on flexible substrates for thermal energy harvesting; 2)Low cost high throughput thin film thermal sensors for thermal mapping and gesture sensing; 3) Flexible smart windows and walls with energy harvesting, environmental sensing and wireless communication functionalities.

Saturday 19th of September 2015

0600 coach + cycle transport
Sports centre next to MSM
Oxford to Cambridge bicycle ride

Many of you expressed interest in this after our last adventure, so we want an MSM team this time.

Contact Prof Harry Bhadeshia for more information

17 September

9 - 5
Goldsmiths 1 & 2
UltraWire Open Day Workshop

First ever development of new generation of ultra performance copper conductor

The Open Day is the first opportunity to learn about some of the EC FP7 UltraWire project results, meet project partners and project management. It would start with in-depth overview of the project and presentation of non-confidential results given by the Ultrawire program leader, Professor Krzysztof Koziol from Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge. This presentation would be followed by some other selected project related presentations related to H&S issues, modeling and exploitation and dissemination. Presentations from other European nano-carbon metal composite research projects are also invited. It is planned to start at 9.30am and finish at 5.00pm with an optional tour of laboratories before lunch.

If you intend to attend this event please contact Dr Krzysztof Koziol (kk292@cam.ac.uk) and Dr Bojan Boskovic (Bojan.Boskovic@CNT-Ltd.co.uk) to receive free of charge access ticket.

10 September

11:30
Goldsmiths1
Digital STM Lithography

Dr James Owen of Zyvex Labs, Texas USA

20 July 2015

11 am
Goldsmiths2
Electron microscopy with a twist: precession diffraction study of Eshelby crystal rotation in InP nanowires and surface plasmon excitation using electron vortex beams

Prof Daniel Ugarte, from the Institute of Physics Gleb Wataghin at the State University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Brazil.

Prof Ugarte will be presenting some of the work he has developed during his sabbatical year working in the Electron Microscopy Group in our Department.

All are very welcome to attend.

17 July

2 - 3.30 pm
Goldsmiths1
INTERNAL STAFF EVENT - Staff Survey Results

HR will be giving a presentation on the results from the recent Staff Survey.

17 July

11 am
Goldsmiths 1
Elucidating Structure and Functionality for Energy Related Materials with Advanced Transmission Electron Microscopy

Professor Peter Crozier (Arizona State University)

16 July

10:30am
Goldsmiths1
Latest advances in Atomic Force Microscopy: Expanding the applications’ horizon to Nano-mechanics, Nano-electrical and Nano-chemistry mapping

AFM WORKSHOP

In conjunction with the University of Cambridge, Bruker Nano-Surfaces would like to invite you to this AFM workshop. The goal of this workshop is to present the latest development in AFM modes for the high-resolution mapping of local nano-mechanical, nano-electrical and nano-chemical properties of surfaces.

10:30 Dr. Khaled Kaja - Bruker Nano-surfaces, UK
Peak Force tapping and Fast scanning AFM: mechanical, electrical and chemical characterization
11:30 Practical demonstration sessions—system: MultiMode8 AFM
17:00 Close

3 July

10:30am
Goldsmiths1
Open Access and Data Sharing – new requirements - info session

Have you heard about funders’ policies for Open Access and research data sharing? If not, don’t panic – the University has developed policies and systems to help.

Come to the dedicated Open Data session organised for researchers in Materials Science on 3 July, starting at 10.30, Goldsmiths’ Lecture Room One, to learn about your funders’ Open Access and research data sharing requirements, and support available to you at the University of Cambridge.

The session is open to everyone:
- principal investigators
- postdocs
- research staff
- administrative staff
- students

The event is free to attend, but we would greatly appreciate if you could register, so that we can estimate the amount of materials to bring with us.
Please follow this link to register for the event

3 July

10am
Goldsmiths2
Superconductivity in the doped ferromagnetic semiconductor samarium nitride

Dr Ben Ruck.
Ben’s area of research interest is experimental condensed matter physics, with a particular focus on growing thin films of novel materials and determining their atomic structure and electronic properties." i.e. materials fabrication, optimisation and characterisation, which may be of interest to many.

29 June

11am
Goldsmiths2
Supersaturation Control, Microstructure and Better Devices: GaN, graphene, MoS2 and Si nanowires

Prof Srinivasan Raghavan, Centre for Nano Science and Engineering, IISc, Bangalore, India

Monday 22 June 2015

all day
Goldsmiths' One and the Tea Room
Postgraduate Seminars and Posters

A programme will be published nearer the time. Come along and support the students!

19 June 2015

2 - 6pm
Churchill College
STAFF-STUDENT CRICKET MATCH - Department Social Event

Everyone is welcome to attend, and an excellent tea will be provided. However, it will be necessary to purchase a ticket (from the Tea Room) beforehand. These will be available from Mon 8th - Wed 17th June, for £1. Both players and non-players need to have a ticket.

If you're interested in playing (no previous experience necessary), then staff (which includes all research students and post-docs) should contact Jimmy Campbell (jc682@cam.ac.uk), whereas students (undergraduates) should get in touch with Rob Crawford (rc545@cam.ac.uk). All are very welcome to play (but no ringers, especially for the students!).

Wednesday 17th June 2015

5pm (25 mins talk + 5 mins of questions)
Goldsmiths 1
DMG Seminars: Novel magnetic textures in rare earth / transition metal multilayers

Thomas Higgs

17 June

10 am
Goldsmiths1
An energetic basis for self-assembly of collagen and the consequent molecular-scale organization of bone

Jim De Yoreo

Division of Physical Sciences, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington

Tuesday 16 June

1:15 pm for 1:45 pm
Pippard Lecture Theatre, Department of Physics
Armourers and Brasiers' Cambridge Forum 2015

The afternoon programme of talks begins at 1.45 (registration from 1.15 pm) at the Pippard Lecture Theatre, Department of Physics, Cavendish Laboratory, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE. The Forum includes the award of the Armourers & Brasiers’ Materials Science Venture Prize and the 17th Kelly Lecture. In 2014, the Forum attracted not only an academic audience, but representatives from some 50 manufacturing companies.

16 June 2015

10 am
Goldsmiths2
Growth and Characterization of III-N Ultraviolet Lasers and Avalanche Photodiodes by MOCVD

Professor Russ Dupuis is a world expert on GaN-based materials and devices and everyone is welcome to attend this talk.

Friday 12th June

4-6pm
Grassy area adjacent to Dept
GARDEN PARTY - Department Social Event

The Department's Garden Party will be held on the lawn next to the building (or in the Tea Room if wet)

Sandwiches, cakes, scones and cream, strawberries and nibbles will be served. Pimms and beer will be available, as well soft drinks.

Tickets £5, - tickets available from the Tea Room and now on sale!

12 June

12 noon
Goldsmiths1
Departmental meeting

Prof Mark Blamire invites all members of the Department to attend a Departmental meeting where he will provide an update on things which affect the Department and give an opportunity to ask questions.

Coffee and muffins will served.

Wednesday 3rd June 2015

5pm (25 mins talk + 5 mins questions)
Goldsmiths 1
DMG Seminars: Superconductor-Ferromagnet nanowire devices

David Gustafsson

20 May 2015

19.30
St Edmund's College
Formal Hall Dinner for Materials Science PhD students

The evening programme at St Edmund's College is as follows:

*19.30 - 20.15: Reception drinks at the Garden Room*

*20.15 - 21.30: Formal hall dinner*

Please book your place via the Department Reception before 17.00 on 1st May.

Wednesday 20th May 2015

5pm (25 mins talk + 5 mins of questions)
Goldsmiths 1
DMG Seminars: Reactive sputter deposition of vertically oriented titanium nitride nanopillar arrays

Thilo Richter

Tuesday 12 May 2015

7 for 7:30pm
Goldsmiths1
CAMSoc: The prospects for thin film PV solar energy in a world dominated by crystalline silicon

Prof Stuart Irvine
Director of CSER
Centre for Solar Energy Research
Prifysgol Glyndwr University

The rapid growth in crystalline silicon PV solar module manufacturing from 2010 to 2014 has dramatically reduced the cost of solar PV installation and helped to grow the global market. Thin film PV products were predicted to take an increasing market share but this has not happened and has fallen back to a traditional 10% of market share. The dilemma for any new technology is trying to predict the market opportunities in the future, when it will be ready for large volume manufacture. To compete with crystalline silicon the volume in 5 years? time will need to be larger than it is today, so the competition for new products gets harder. However, there has not been a more exciting time for research in materials for thin film PV, with compound semiconductor materials such as cadmium telluride and copper indium disellenide both exceeding 20% cell efficiency, the rapid rise of the remarkable Perovskites with cell efficiency exceeding 17% and a range of emerging materials based on earth abundant elements. This talk will explore some of the exciting applications that are well suited to thin film PV which will unlock new markets for clean and renewable electricity generation in the future.

As usual the meeting will begin with light refreshments in the Tea Room from 7pm. The lecture will start at 7.30 pm. All welcome.

12 May

2pm
Goldsmiths1
All epitaxial small-gap perovskite oxide p-n junctions

Dr. Scott Chambers, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Abstract:

The ability to effectively harvest visible sunlight for the purpose of photovoltaics, photoelectrochemistry and photochemical organics destruction is of clear importance in the energy and environmental landscapes. Several different classes of materials are under consideration for this purpose. Perovskite oxide semiconductors are of interest because of their superior stability in aqueous environments compared to that of traditional semiconductors. In our research, we focus on the deposition of structurally and compositionally well-defined doped perovskites by molecular beam epitaxy for the purpose of understanding the intrinsic electronic, magnetic, optical and photochemical properties of oxide heterojunctions. In this talk, I will discuss our efforts in fabricating and characterizing epitaxial p-SrxLa1-xCrO3/n-SrTiO3(001) interfaces. Replacing La with Sr in LaCrO3 dopes holes into the Cr 3d t2g-derived top of the valence band, resulting in significantly enhanced conductivity with characteristics of both polaronic and band-like conduction. X-ray based spectroscopies (XPS and XAS) reveal that Sr doping results in a split-off, unoccupied Cr 3d t2g-derived band above the Fermi level which shifts in energy with increasing x. The material becomes metallic above x = ~0.5, but only when grown without large (~1%) in-plane tensile strain. When grown with ~0.5 to 1% in-plane tensile strain, SrxLa1-xCrO3 exhibits the characteristics of a p-type transparent conducting oxide, which is of significant importance in its own right. p-Sr0.1La0.9CrO3/n-SrTiO3(001) heterojunctions appear from XPS to be bona fide p-n junctions, with spectroscopic signatures of the two kinds of built-in potentials expected for a III-III/II-IV perovskite p-n junction. Transport measurements are currently underway.

Wednesday 6th May 2015

5pm (25 mins talk + 5 mins questions)
Goldsmiths 1
DMG Seminars: Signatures of magnetic-dependent gapless odd-frequency states at superconductor/ferromagnet interfaces

Angelo Di Bernardo

Wed 6th May

12:30 pm
The Tea Room and Terrace
LUNCHTIME BARBEQUE - Department Social Event

Our resident chefs will once again be at the ready with their spatulas to flip those burgers!

Tickets available from the Tearoom - £5 each.

20 April

11 am onwards
Goldsmiths2
Lattice-mismatched epitaxy of III-phosphides for solar cells and LEDs

11 - 12: A seminar from Dr Kunal Mukherjee of MIT
12 - 1: A showcase of short talks by members of the Cambridge GaN Centre on work on the ERC MACONS project (MACONS = "A Multi-microscopy Approach to the Characterisation Of Nitride Semiconductors"). This will include work using TEM, AFM, SEM-CL, FIB and atom probe tomography, and will address various materials science issues in the nitrides. Everyone in the department is welcome to attend either the first part of this event (Mukherjee seminar from 11 - 12) or the second (MACONS showcase from 12 - 1) or both.

17 April

2pm
Goldsmiths1
A BRIEF LOOK AT FOOTWEAR and the MATERIALS SCIENCE INVOLVED…

Dr. Brian Prevo, Materials Science Research Director, in the Nike Explore Team.

As athletes get better and better the gap at the finish line between 1rst and 2nd place shrinks. Pushing the boundaries of athletic footwear performance has lead to a number of recent product innovations powered by new or repurposed materials. The demands placed upon materials to enable better, faster, lighter, stronger footwear performance drive our new product innovation. This presentation will provide a high level look at product innovation, broader impacts those innovations may have, a deeper look at some of the key functional materials currently employed in footwear, and where things may go in the future.

08 April 2015

10am
Goldsmiths1
Ultraviolet Radiation Absorbability of Shape Memory/ZnO and Other Polymer Composites

Tsz-ting Wong, Isabel

PhD Student
Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University
Kowloon, Hong Kong SAR

Abstract: This seminar presents the development of UV resistant polymer-based composites to resist the harmful effects of UVR and protect the materials from UV degradation. Exposure to UVR is unavoidable for polymer-based materials if they were utilized under sunlight as fibre reinforced polymer composites (FRPCs) are extensively applicable in aerospace, automobile and construction industries nowadays. It has been found that UVR could cause damages in the structure of FRPC including discolouration, cracks and delamination which would result in the loss of mechanical properties of materials. Therefore, UV protection is a vital research in developing a structural polymer-based composite. Nano-ZnO particle has its intrinsic property enabling the absorption of UVR in the range of 290-400nm. By incorporating nano-ZnO, full UVR absorption and enhancement in hardness of the polymer could be achieved. In the seminar, two development approaches of UV resistant materials will be introduced. The first approach is by using nano-ZnO/epoxy filled hollow glass fibres (HGFs) epoxy layer incorporated on glass fibre reinforced epoxy composite (GFREC) for protecting the material beneath from UV degradation and the second approach is by incorporating nano-ZnO particles in shape memory polymer (SMP).

Thursday 19 March 2015

7 for 7:30pm
Goldsmiths1
CAMSoc: Cellulose: Future technology for the world?s most utilised material

Prof Steve Eichorn, University of Exeter

This talk will look at the most utilised material on the planet; cellulose. Central to all plant systems the polymer cellulose provides the building block for all plant material, and has and is used for a wide range of applications. The talk will show how economic power in the UK was once focused on cellulose and how in the future this material may once again provide the framework for our source new advances in the applications of materials, food and fuel. Emergent areas of research, such as the use of nanocellulose fibres will be presented with a view to developing products that can change lives.

As usual the meeting will begin with light refreshments in the Tea Room from 7pm. The lecture will start at 7.30 pm. All welcome.

18/03/2015

5pm
Goldsmiths 1
Domain walls as nano-reactors

Saeedeh Farokhipoor

12 March

2:30 pm
Wolfson Lecture Theatre, Department of Chemistry
EXTERNAL EVENT: Noble Metal Nanoparticles and Porous Materials for Heterogeneous Catalysis, Separations, and Chemical Sensing

An informal Material RIG Seminar for invited guest speaker, Professor Simon Humphrey from the University of Texas at Austin.

10 March 2015

11am
Large A&B room
Transition metal pnictides: epitaxy and polymorphism

Gavin Bell, Department of Physics, University of Warwick

Binary transition metal pnictides such as CrAs or MnSb are of great interest for hybrid spintronic devices. For the most part they are chemically and epitaxially compatible with mainstream semiconductors, are weakly metallic, and show the full spectrum of magnetic ordering (e.g. CrSb-NiSb-MnSb are antiferrimagnetic, paramagnetic and ferrimagnetic respectively). This suggests the possibility of growing all-epitaxial structures with arbitrary metal/semiconductor and magnetic/nonmagnetic layers. In this talk I will discuss our progress on growing NiSb, CrSb and (mainly) MnSb on different semiconductor substrates. In epilayer form, MnSb exhibits polymorphism, with wurtzite and cubic structures appearing as well as the usual double hcp phase. The strain relaxation and polymorphism of MnSb are interesting and differ from standard III-V semiconductor epitaxy. These aspects of growth are revealed by STM, TEM and synchrotron XRD. Cubic MnSb is a predicted half-metallic ferrimagnetic material (100% spin polarised at the Fermi level) at T = 0K and I will also discuss our work in nonzero temperature extension of standard density functional theory (DFT) to predict minority spin gaps in half-metals.

04/03/2015

5pm
Goldsmiths 1
Conventional superconductor with intrinsic exchange fields

Avradeep Pal

3rd March

12 noon
Goldsmiths1
LEARN MORE ABOUT KNOVEL – A TEACHING, RESEARCH AND COURSEWORK TOOL FOR ENGINEERS AND SCIENTISTS AVAILABLE NOW AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE

(Event postponed from 18th Feb).

The University is currently running a six month trial of KNOVEL, an online service for discovering reference information, interactive content and properties data for engineers and scientists.

The Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, in collaboration with Elsevier, would like to invite academic staff and students to an introductory session on Knovel, hosted by Jason De Boer from Elsevier, who will give an overview of the trial, provide a live demonstration of Knovel to show how it can support your teaching, coursework and research, and answer any questions you may have.

We hope you are able to join us and we greatly appreciate your involvement in this trial - by using Knovel and providing your feedback, you can help the university to evaluate Knovel as a resource for engineering and science.

LUNCH WILL BE PROVIDED - please let Cristina Burton (Librarian) know if you are coming - for lunch planning.

To take a look at Knovel and to start using it, please visit APP.KNOVEL.COM

3rd March

10-11:30
Goldsmiths1
The Most Complex Machines Ever

Prof. Ian Phillips is Principal Staff Engineer at ARM Ltd, UK.

Abstract: Today, we are making the most complex machines that the world has ever know; tomorrow they will be even more so. We sell them in large volumes to customers who value their functionality but have no recognition of the technology that enables them; even less, our roles in their creation. Technology products don't grow on trees, they are painstakingly designed and constructed one molecule at a time by man(kind). And the more complex the machines the ever more complex they will have been to design and construct. Alas, out of sight is out of mind; so as our technology becomes less visible to the user, then their support for its evolution will diminish! To correct this we must educate the public; but before we can do that we must understand what we do ourselves ... This talk could just be the start of that process.

Thursday 26 February

CANCELLED - BBQ Social Event

The BBQ has been cancelled due to weather conditions.

25 February 2015

6 for 6:30pm
Goldsmiths1
CAMSoc: IoM3 Young Persons Lecture Competition

The Cambridge heat of the 2015 IOM3 Young Persons Lecture Competition (YPLC) will take place in the Department this month.

This is an event which aims to judge the presentation skills of young Materials Scientists and their ability to communicate with a generalist audience a Materials-related topic of their choice. The Cambridge area has had success in previous years with a number of our presenters being selected to compete in regional heats and in the National Final (which this year will be held in April at the Armourers' Hall in London).

Copies of rules and entry form can be found at http://www.iom3.org/content/young-persons-lecture-competition.

For the Local Heat, we will hold competitions in both the undergraduate and postgraduate categories. Cash prizes are normally awarded to ALL competitors ....

Light refreshments from 6pm, lecture competition begins at 6:30pm.

We hope very much that we will continue the tradition of the past few years and have plenty of support from both undergraduates and postgrads/ postdocs for a really good evening and high standard competition.

18/02/2015

5pm
Goldsmiths 1
Spin-filter tunnelling of electrons through rare-earth mononitrides

Prasanta Muduli

POSTPONED (was 18th February)

POSTPONED - LEARN MORE ABOUT KNOVEL – A TEACHING, RESEARCH AND COURSEWORK TOOL FOR ENGINEERS AND SCIENTISTS AVAILABLE NOW AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE

The KNOVEL demonstration has been POSTPONED until 3rd March due to the speaker being unwell.

Monday 9th February

1- 2pm
Tea Room
DEPARTMENT QUIZ - Department Social Event

Quizmaster Rebecca Pritchard returns to host the next Department quiz. The theme is 'entertainment', but don't let that fool you into thinking it will be easy!

Enter your team £2 per person max of 6 per team. Ticket price includes snacks and nibbles.

Tickets will be on sale from the tearoom - an email will circulate when they are available.

04/02/2015

5pm
Goldsmiths 1
What is a good research paper?

Judith Driscoll

29/01/2015

2 pm
Goldsmiths1
Studying the Mechanical Behaviour of Individual Nanosystems by In-situ Electron Microscopy Experiments

Prof Daniel Ugarte, Dept. of Physics Gleb Wataghin, State University of Campinas (UNICAMP).

The new properties of nanomaterials place them as promising elements to develop novel devices and technologies. Nevertheless, the detailed analysis of the mechanical response of nanoscale systems represents a serious challenge, rendering difficult the development of basic understanding and technological exploration. We will present the application of in-situ dynamical electron microscopy techniques to analyse in detail the behaviour of metal nanowires subjected to elongation stresses. In particular, we will address, the atomistic aspects associated with the deformation and rupture of noble metal nanorods as function of temperature. Our results indicate that surface energy (ex. steps) overrule staking fault energetics and, that both size and shape determines the active deformation mechanisms during the elongation process. We will also describe the measurement of subtle lattice distortions within InP NWs containing an axial screw dislocation by combining imaging and diffraction approaches; in particular, these wires show a crystal rotation due to the dislocation induced torque (Eshelby twist).

Tuesday 27 January 2015

7 for 7:30pm
Goldsmiths1
CAMSoc: Metal thieves – marking your cards, the work of Signature Materials

David W Arthur
Project Manager, Signature Materials, IOM3

The Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining (IOM3) has formed Signature Materials to tackle the ever present problem of metal theft. IOM3 has developed unique OVERT metal "signatures" which, together with an instantly accessible national register provides a solution to a crime that costs the UK economy an estimated ?220 million per year. The readable signature information is held within a National Register (MaRC, the Materials Registration Centre securely maintained by IOM3) linked to Police systems, and can be traced by police within a matter of minutes. This rapid traceability of the metal, without the need for a forensic check, to the site of a theft has previously been a major problem. With the new marks, there is no ambiguity, as the metal is linked to a given location - thieves can be charged on the spot. Processes have been developed for marking of wire, tube and sheet in a range of materials including lead, copper, aluminium and stainless steel. Since inception the range has been developed and the work with ENWL on hardening substation assets has seen an award for the initiative resulting in the largest crime reduction.

As usual the meeting will begin with light refreshments in the Tea Room from 7pm. The lecture will start at 7.30 pm. All welcome.

21/01/2015

5pm
Goldsmiths 1
Magnetoelectric heterostructures

Massimo Ghidini

20 January 2015

4pm
Goldsmiths1
Liquid and vapour phase crystal growth in the transmission electron microscope

Frances Ross, IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York, USA.

In situ transmission electron microscopy is a unique and exciting technique for visualising and quantifying crystal growth. Both vapour and liquid phase deposition can be carried out inside the microscope, recording images while growth takes place. We can measure kinetics, identify transient phases, and determine mechanisms by correlating structures with growth parameters. We will illustrate this through movies of vapour-phase growth of semiconductor nanowires from catalytic particles, relevant to low-power electronics, and liquid-phase electrochemical formation of dendrites, with applications in battery operation. We will discuss how recent advances in microscopy will enable in situ imaging to expand its role in understanding growth physics and designing nanomaterials.

16 January 2015

11am
Goldsmiths 1
Transition metal chalcogenides: ultrathin inorganic materials with tunable electronic properties

Professor Thomas Heine
Jacobs University Bremen, Campus Ring 1, 28759 Bremen, Germany

After the discovery of graphene and the development of powerful exfoliation techniques, experimental preparation of two-dimensional (2D) crystals can be expected for any layered material that is known to chemistry. Besides graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), transition metal chalcogenides (TMC) are among the most studied ultrathin materials. In particular single-layer MoS2, a direct band-gap semiconductor with ~1.9 eV energy gap, is popular in physics and nanoelectronics, as it nicely complements semimetallic graphene and insulating h-BN monolayer as construction component for flexible 2D electronics, and as it was already successfully applied in the laboratory as basis material for transistors and other electronic and optoelectronic devices. 2D crystals are subject to significant quantum confinement: if compared to their parent layered 3D material they show different structural, electronic and optical properties, such as spontaneous rippling as free-standing monolayer, significant changes of the electronic band structure, giant spin-orbit splitting, and enhanced photoluminescence. Most of those properties are intrinsic for the monolayer and already absent for two-layer stacks of the same 2D crystal. For example, single-layer MoS2 is a direct band gap semiconductor with spin-orbit splitting of 150 meV in the valence band, while the bilayer of the same material is an indirect band-gap semiconductor without observable spin-orbit splitting. All these properties have been observed experimentally and are in excellent agreement with calculations based on density-functional theory. This Account reports theoretical studies of a subgroup of transition metal dichalcogenides with the composition MX2, with M = Mo, W, X = Se, S, also referred to as “MoWSeS materials”. Results on the electronic structure, quantum confinement, spin-orbit coupling, spontaneous monolayer rippling, and the change of the electronic properties in presence of an external electric field are reported. While all materials of the MoWSeS family share the same qualitative properties, their individual values can differ strongly, e.g. the spin-orbit splitting in WSe2 reaches the value of 428 meV, nearly three times that of MoS2. Further, we discuss the effect of strain on the electronic properties (straintronics). While MoWSeS single layers are very robust against external electric fields, bilayers show a linear reduction of the band gap, even reaching a semiconductor-metal phase transition, and an increase of the spin-orbit splitting from zero to the monolayer value at rather small fields. Strain is yet another possibility to control the band gap in a linear way, and MoWSeS monolayers become metallic at strain values of ~10%. The density-functional based tight-binding model is a useful tool to investigate the electronic and structural properties, including electron conductance, of large MoS2 structures, which show spontaneous rippling in finite-temperature molecular dynamics simulations. Structural defects in MoS2 result in anisotropy of the electric conductivity. Finally, DFT predictions on the properties of noble metal dichalcogenides are presented. Most strikingly, 1T PdS2 is an indirect band-gap semiconductor in its monolayer form, but is metallic as a bilayer.

8th January

11am
Goldsmiths1
Novel III-nitride quantum dots with unusual optical properties

Speaker: Prof Munetaka Arita of the University of Tokyo

III-nitride quantum dots (QDs) have attracted great interest as a promising material for quantum information devices operating at room temperature. We have recently developed GaN/Al(Ga)N nanowire QDs and GaN/AlGaN interface-fluctuation QDs, both have remarkable optical properties. Coherent control and room-temperature single photon emission have been achieved by using small, site-controlled nanowire QDs. On the other hand, GaN interface-fluctuation QDs which are formed in a thin GaN/AlGaN quantum well exhibit strikingly narrow linewidths (minimum ~0.10 meV). Interestingly, fine-structure splittings of both the excitonic and the biexcitonic states are also clearly resolved in a single interface-fluctuation QD, which is quite unusual for conventional III-nitride QDs.

23 December 2014

12 noon
Tearoom
DEPARTMENT CHRISTMAS DRINKS AND NIBBLES

Prof Mark Blamire invites members of the Department to join him for a celebratory drink and mince pie (or two?!) to mark the end of the year. All welcome.

19 December 2014

11:30am
Goldsmiths1
DEPARTMENT ANNUAL MEETING

The annual meeting of the Department will be held on 19th December. Items on the agenda include: an overview of the Department including highlights, 2 short presentations, and an opportunity for Assistant Staff to raise questions. We look forward to seeing you there. Coffee and muffins will be served.

10/12/2014

5pm
Goldsmiths 1
Mechanochemistry: a simple route to prepare nanostructured ceramics at room temperature

Pedro Sanchez Jimenez

08/12/2014

4pm
Goldsmiths 1
Martensitic transformation in epitaxial magnetic shape memory films

Robert Niemann (IFW Dresden, TU Dresden)

Magnetic shape memory alloys can be used for large-strain actuator materials and in magnetocaloric regenerators of solid-state cooling devices. The energy efficiency of both applications depends strongly on the microstructure developing during a martensitic transformation. A martensitic microstructure that forms with as low elastic energy as possible and which contains only weakly pinned twin boundaries is optimal for application. Often, the martensite shows unique and beautiful patterns (see figure). We use sputter-deposited epitaxial Ni-Mn-Ga films to study the nucleation and growth of martensite in-situ in the scanning electron microscope. The final microstructure is also analyzed by means of transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. We explain the observed growth process using a model derived from the phenomenological theory of martensite crystallography and finite element calculations. We see that the hysteresis is dominated by nucleation and we present a way to influence the nucleation by nanoindentation. Scanning electron microscopy image of an epitaxial Ni-Mn-Ga film in the martensitic state.

Tuesday 2 December 2014

7 for 7:30pm
Goldsmiths1
CAMSoc event: Biosensors; Past Present and Future; The Role Materials Over The Past Two Decades - With A look To The Future

Seamus Higson, Cranfield University

Biosensors are best known for the hand held blood glucose sensors used by almost all diabetics the world over; commercial sales of biosensors continue to grow nearly exponentially both for the blood glucose / diabetes market, but also for a range of other medical applications to allow, for example, screening for - and the early diagnosis for a range of cancers, infectious diseases and a number of other disease states.

While it is widely acknowledged that many technologies have come together to allow new devices to be realised, the role of materials has often been overlooked. This talk will firstly give an overview of biosensors and their development over the last two decades along with a look to devices currently in development and where the field might continue to develop into the future.

Professor Higson will give a personal perspective of how in many cases Materials Engineering has allowed different fields to come together to create radically new devices that are making a real impact by transforming medical diagnostics and healthcare management.

26/11/2014

5pm
Goldsmiths 1
Nanofabrication Techniques for Hybrid Quantum Systems

Jessica Maclean (University of Nottingham)

Tuesday 18 November 2014

18:30 hrs
Goldsmiths1
CAMSoc event: Biomaterial Scaffolds talks

Explore how naturally occurring body materials, such as collagen and bone mineral, can create biomaterial scaffolds which play a significant role in tissue regeneration.

This event will be held jointly with the East Anglian branch of the Society of Biology, at the University of Cambridge Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy.

Members and guests of both societies are very welcome to attend this free event.

To reserve your place email the events coordinator at societyofbiologyea@gmail.com by Friday 14th November 2014. Please include your affiliation (Society of Biology / CAMSOC) and a contact telephone number.
http://www.iom3.org/events/biomaterial-scaffolds

Thursday 13th November

1- 2pm
Tea Room
DEPARTMENT QUIZ - Department Social Event

Thought you'd never have to revise again? Well think again!

This time the Quizmaster is Rebecca Pritchard. Be prepared for wide variety of topics and some brain-racking questions.

Enter your team £2 per person max of 6 per team. Ticket price includes snacks and nibbles.

On sale from the tearoom from the start of full term.

12/11/2014

5pm
Goldsmiths 1
Evidence of Gap-less superconductivity in a conventional BCS superconductor

Avradeep Pal

22 October 2014

7 for 7:30pm
Goldsmiths1
CAMSoc: Richard III: Wounds, Weapons and Armour

Speaker: Prof. Sarah Hainsworth, University of Leicester, has been involved in the examination of Richard III’s skeleton since its discovery in 2012. Some of this work has been published in the Lancet online in the past month.

Richard III died at the Battle of Bosworth on 22 August 1485. He was the only English Monarch since 839 whose final resting place was unknown until in August 2012, the site of Greyfriars in Leicester was excavated and revealed a grave in a high status position beneath the choir. The skeleton was an adult male with severe scoliosis and significant trauma from battlefield injuries. Radiocarbon dating indicated the skeleton’s age fitted a timeframe that was consistent with that of Richard III. Mitochondrial DNA analysis showed that the skeleton's DNA matched that of well-verified matrilineal descendants and thus the skeleton was confirmed to be that of Richard III. This talk will discuss the trauma sustained by the skeleton, the techniques used to analyse the wounds and will relate them to the armour and mediaeval weapons used at that time.


The presentation will commence at 7:30 pm, with light refreshments from 7:00 pm.

Further information available from Serena Best (email - smb51@cam.ac.uk)

All welcome.

14/10/2014

2:15pm
A&B Room
Chemically Stable Proton Conducting Materials for Reversible Fuel Cells

Enrico Traversa
Professor of Materials Science and Engineering

Physical Science and Engineering Division
King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)

26/09/2014

all day
Goldsmiths 1
SpinIcur 2nd Network Event

Day 5 of 5

25/09/2014

all day
Goldsmiths 1
SpinIcur 2nd Network Event

Day 4 of 5

24/09/2014

all day
Goldsmiths 1
SpinIcur 2nd Network Event

Day 3 of 5

23/09/2014

all day
Goldsmiths 1
SpinIcur 2nd Network Event

Day 2 of 5

22/09/2014

all day
Goldsmiths 1
SpinIcur 2nd Network Event

Day 1 of 5

Thursday 11 September 2014

1200
Goldsmiths 1
"Multiple dislocation pile-ups in small grains at small strains: implications for the Hall-Petch relationship and backstress screening

Talk to be given by Prof Rafael Schouwenaars Departamento de Materiales y Manufactura, Facultad de Ingeniería Edificio O, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Avenida Universidad 3000, Coyoacán, 04510, México D.F.

Abstract. A classic explanation for the Hall-Petch relationship is given by the stress field of a single dislocation pile-up perpendicular to the grain boundary. Similarly, the gradual compensation of the stress fields of pile-ups on both sides of the boundary has been invoked to explain the transitory effects observed in the stress-strain curves of ultrafine grained polycrystals. This presentation studies the effects of introducing deviations of the highly simplified geometry mentioned above, using the proper mathematical approximations of linear elastic dislocation theory. Multiple pile-ups invalidate the conclusions drawn from the single pile-up model. Pile-ups in multiple grains are assessed by a highly idealised model of an infinite array of periodical pile-ups, which can be treated analytically through a little-known integral equation. In the latter case, screening is always perfect. In between the extreme cases of the single pile-up and the infinite array of parallel pile-ups, there is a broad spectrum of more realistic configurations. By considering the Peach-Köhler force between dislocations mutually disoriented grains, the magnitude of the fluctuations around idealised casez can be estimated. However, using sound probabilistic arguments to calculate the free path for dislocation slip in fine-grained polycrystals, it is found that the amount of dislocations that can be stored in the pile-ups is generally too small to explain the strong grain size effects observed experimentally.

Tuesday 12th August

12.30-2pm
On the terrace/tea room
SUMMER BBQ - Department Social Event

Following a successful BBQ in May we are hosting a summer BBQ event in August. Bring you sun hats, sunglasses and sun cream and relax on the terrace with your friends and good food!

Tickets £5 on sale from the tearoom from 21 July.

(DATE CHANGE - previously advertised date was 7th Aug.)

Mon 11 August

10.30
Evetts Room
Graphene-Nanoparticle Hybrid Nanomaterials for Sensing and Energy Applications

This talk will be delivered by Prof Junhong Chen - Director, Laboratory of Nanotechnology for Sustainable Energy and Environment, University of Wisconsin.

7 August 2014

11:00-13:00
Goldsmiths 2
Dr Witold Kwapinski: Bio-char surface chemistry

Dr Kwapinski, a chemical engineering lecturer at the University of Limerick, will deliver this lecture about bio-char surface chemistry.

The surface chemistry of bio-chars, as expected from their heterogeneous compositions, is quite rich and varied. Its surface exhibits hydrophilic, hydrophobic, acidic and basic properties whose relative contributions to bio-char reactivity depend upon the feedstock and on the thermal degradation process used to create the product. I review the molecular properties that give rise to bio-char surface chemistry and then discuss how these properties affect the ability of bio-chars to react with chemicals, focus on soil environments. The structure of char consists of a three-dimensional macromolecular network, consisting of fused aromatic clusters with functional group substituents. Also soil amendment with bio-char has attracted widespread attention because it increases its fertility and sequester carbon. Attention is centred on the characterization of the aromatic ring cluster and their functionalities. This is achieved by utilizing spectroscopic techniques.
More details

6 August 2014

11:00-12:00
Goldsmiths 2
Dr Witold Kwapinski: Bio-mass/waste thermal conversion technology and product properties, part 2

Dr Kwapinski, a chemical engineering lecturer at the University of Limerick, will deliver the first part of this lecture about bio-mass thermal conversion.

Second generation biofuels are produced from non-food crops. This involves the utilisation of lignocellulosic materials, such as agriculture and forestry residues, some industrial waste materials, and also dedicated lignocellulose crops. The thermal decomposition is amongst the wildest applied and, as a result of bio-waste conversion, bio-oil, synthesis gas with differing energy values, and char residue (bio-char) are obtained. This communication reviews procedures for feedstock conversion (focus on gasification, pyrolysis & acid hydrolysis) and product characterisation, and describes some results on product upgrading.
More details

5 August 2014

11:00-13:00
Goldsmiths 2
Dr Witold Kwapinski: Bio-mass/waste thermal conversion technology and product properties, part 1

Dr Kwapinski, a chemical engineering lecturer at the University of Limerick, will deliver the first part of this lecture about bio-mass thermal conversion.

Second generation biofuels are produced from non-food crops. This involves the utilisation of lignocellulosic materials, such as agriculture and forestry residues, some industrial waste materials, and also dedicated lignocellulose crops. The thermal decomposition is amongst the wildest applied and, as a result of bio-waste conversion, bio-oil, synthesis gas with differing energy values, and char residue (bio-char) are obtained. This communication reviews procedures for feedstock conversion (focus on gasification, pyrolysis & acid hydrolysis) and product characterisation, and describes some results on product upgrading.
More details

Thurs 31st July

2-3pm
Goldsmiths2
Large strain elastic response of auxetic foams

Jacopo Ciambella is Lecturer in Composites Engineering at the Advanced Composites Centre for Innovation and Science of the University of Bristol. His interest on nonlinear viscoelasticity of nano­ composites has origins from his PhD work undertaken at the University of Rome “La Sapienza” in cooperation with Bridgestone Technical Center Europe (2006-2010). His research also deals with micro-macro modelling of multifunctional composites and energy absorbing composite materials.

30 July 2014

4-5pm
Goldsmiths1
Shape Memory Polymers and Multifunctional Composites

Prof. Leng is the Director of Center for Smart Materials and Structures at Harbin Institute of Technology, Editor-In-Chief of the International Journal of Smart and Nano Materials, and is the recepient of numerous honorary fellowships and awards.

18 July

3pm
Goldsmiths1
Active Materials and Structures

Prof. Chris Bowen from the University of Bath

This seminar will outline the research undertaken in the areas of functional materials and composites such as ferroelectrics and piezocomposites. The talk will explore the potential applications of these materials, examples will include sensors for hostile environments, bistable structures for harvesting energy, pyroelectric harvesting and novel GaN based nano-structures.

15 July

11am
Goldsmiths1
Exploring the limits of TEM-EELS

Ray Egerton, Department of Physics,
University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.

Transmission electron microscopes are now capable of a spatial resolution below 0.1 nm and (when fitted with an electron energy-loss spectrometer) an energy resolution below 10 meV, so that for many specimens the performance limits are determined by physical principles rather than electron optics. The talk will explore these limits for various types of specimen, together with the time-resolution limits that are possible with a pulsed electron beam.

8 July

2pm
Goldsmiths1
Gatan Ilion capability presentation

Gatan will be giving a presentation on the capabilities of their Ilion ion beam miller for SEM sample preparation.

Everyone is very welcome to attend the talk. If you think you would like to use the Ilion during its visit to the department from 8th to 18th July, and have not yet contacted Dr Rachel Oliver by e-mail, please could you do so as soon as possible.

03/07/2014

4pm
Goldsmiths 1
Energy:-- Where it Comes From, What We Do With It

Speaker: Professor Peter Rez from Arizona State University

27 June

3pm
Goldsmiths1
Multi-functional properties of the Gallium Nitride Nanowall Network

Prof. S.M. Shivaprasad, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research,
Bangalore, India

27/06/2014

11am
Goldsmiths' 1
Sir Martin Wood Lecture

Dr Naoya Shibata
Development of an advanced transmission scanning electron microscope for materials science research

26th June 2014

2.30pm
Goldsmith 1
Dynamic Nuclear Polarization enhanced Solid State NMR of Challenging Spins

Dr. Frederic Blanc from University of Liverpool is giving a talk entitled "Dynamic Nuclear Polarization enhanced Solid State NMR of Challenging Spins" .

23 June

9:30am onwards
Goldsmiths1
Postgraduate Seminars and Posters 2014

All Welcome.

Please come along to Goldsmiths' Lecture Room One on Monday 23rd June to hear the research talks being given by our first year PhD students (and
some of the second years who were unable to present talks last year).

This year we have changed the format to 8-minute presentations plus two for questions. The talks will be chaired by members of the academic
staff and will run for the full day, starting at about 9:30am.

The schedule will shortly be on display around the Department.

Posters prepared by the second year PhD students will also be on display in the tea room from lunchtime.

20 June 2014

3pm
Churchill College
STAFF-STUDENT CRICKET MATCH - Department Social Event

Venue: Churchill Cricket Ground
Time: 3pm start - finish about 7pm
Tea: Tea and cakes etc provided (at about 5pm)

Please come and support the teams!

20 June

9.45am to 5.30pm
Hauser Forum, West Cambridge
Industry Engagement Forum with Element Six

Element Six (www.e6.com) is a global leader in the design, development and production of synthetic diamond super materials.

The workshop hosted by the Department of Materials Science, in the Hauser Forum, will consist of a day of facilitated discussions between our respective researchers, scientists and engineers, with the possibility of collaborative projects to follow.

To register for the Forum, please contact Paul Mantle, KTF for Materials Science, pam73@cam.ac.uk

18th June 2014

11.30am
Goldsmith 1
Structural studies on apatite and melilite electrolytes

Talk by Prof.Timothy White from
Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

17 June 2014

1.45-6.30pm
Pippard LT, Cavendish Laboratory
Armourers and Brasiers Cambridge Forum 2014

The Kelly Lecturer for 2014 is Professor Nicholas D. Spencer, Chair; Laboratory of Surface Science and Technology, Department of Materials, ETH Zurich and President, ETH Research Commission. The title of his talk is "Made-to-Measure Surfaces".

Registration from 1:15pm. Gordon Seminars start 1:45pm followed by the Kelly Lecture at 5:20pm.

Register your interest in advance via the ABC Forum website.
http://www.msm.cam.ac.uk/forum/

Friday 13th June

4-6pm
On the green next to the building
GARDEN PARTY - Department Social Event

Enjoy sandwiches, scones, cakes, snacks and nibbles with a glass of Punch in the late afternoon sun.

Tickets £5, £2.50 concession for Undergraduate Students. Children of staff/students are welcome at no extra charge (under 16).

Children and partners welcome!

On sale from the tearoom from Monday 19 May.

11 June

17.00
Goldsmiths 1
DMG Seminar: P(VDF-TrFE) Piezoelectric Polymer Nanowires

Richard Whiter

Monday 9th June

11:00 am to 2:00 pm
Goldsmiths 1
ABAQUS, COMSOL and SIMPLEWARE Capability Overview Event

Speakers
James Dean (MSM)
Clint Davies-Taylor (ABAQUS)
Robert Boswell (COMSOL)
Rebecca Bryan (SIMPLEWARE)
Register for this event

5 June

11:30am
Goldsmiths1
New Hydrothermal Synthesis Routes to Functional Oxide Materials

Richard I. Walton
Department of Chemistry, University of Warwick

28 May

17.00
Goldsmiths 2
DMG Seminar: Growth of spinel materials for a high efficiency room temperature spin filter device

Salvatore Mesoraca

Note change of normal venue to Goldsmiths 2 due to the Exam period

Tuesday 20 May 2014

19.30 hrs
Goldsmiths 1
CAMSoc: Bugs 'n Steel Afloat and On Shore

Dr James Cleland, Camcor

Synopsis: Microbially-influenced corrosion (MIC) is possibly the most extensive and expensive mode of corrosion. MIC has been documented in chemical, food and pulp and paper processing; conventional and nuclear power generation; exploration, production, transportation, storage and use of hydrocarbon fuels; and marine and fire protection systems. Although MIC does not produce an unique type of corrosion, most is localised corrosion and can take the form of pitting, crevice corrosion, under deposit corrosion and de-alloying, in addition to enhanced galvanic corrosion and erosion corrosion.

Light refreshments available from 19.00hrs, lecture commences 19.30hrs

Monday 19 May

11:30am
Goldsmith 1
From Source to Screen - Auditing the STEM to Improve Quantitative HAADF Precision

Speaker: Dr. Lewys Jones from the University of Oxford.
Aberration corrected HAADF STEM is capable of producing absolutely beautiful images. Unfortunately, pretty pictures alone are not enough to learn all there is to learn about our samples. For this we need so-called 'quantitative HAADF'. At its most simple this just involves dividing the observed intensity by the intensity of the full-beam, this then gives data expressed in units of 'fractional beam current' and is directly comparable with simulation. Unfortunately matters are not so simple, ADF detectors are far from homogeneous and post-specimen lenses can distort or truncate the scattering we aim to record. We have developed methods to evaluate the post-specimen flux and to incorporate the detector in-homogeneity to yield quantitative HAADF data with greatly improved accuracy. There are many applications of this improved imaging accuracy and 3D nanometrology of catalyst nanoparticles are presented as an example.

Fri 16 May

2pm
Goldsmiths2
Ion-specific effects in control of the foam production

Prof. Karakashev is Associate Professor in the Department of Physical Chemistry at Sofia University

14 May

17.00
Goldsmiths 1
DMG Seminar: High fields from bulk superconductors

John Durrell

Thursday 8th May 2014

4pm to 5pm
Goldsmith 2
From weakness comes strength - Engineering weakness into solids as a route to advanced materials that are inaccessible through traditional methods

Professor Russel Morris from University of St Andrews will give a talk.

Many materials, and particularly framework materials, are made through hydrothermal or solvothermal synthesis. However, the method of synthesis is vitally important in determining which materials can be made and which cannot. In this talk I will explore the reasons behind the famous correlation between framework energy and density seen in zeolites and metal-organic frameworks (first published by Tony Cheetham) and explain how it might be possible to avoid the limitations this places on the types of materials that can be prepared using traditional solvothermal methods. I will then describe strategies to target new materials in the energy/density space that should not be accessible by traditional methods in both metal-organic framework and zeolite systems. I will show how new materials can be prepared by deliberately exploiting 'weaknesses’ that have been engineered into materials that allow further manipulation to materials that move away from Cheetham’s correlation. I will also show how these synthetic methodologies allow us to prepare solids with completely new properties. In particular I will show how we can prepare materials with continuously tuneable porosity – something that is a ‘holy grail’ in porous material synthesis and something that is not possible in traditional framework materials synthesis, where stepwise control of porosity is the only option (e.g. the reticular synthesis of MOFs).

Thursday 8 May

12:30 - 2 pm
The Tea Room and Terrace
LUNCHTIME BARBEQUE - Department Social Event

Weather permitting, our resident chefs Kevin Roberts and Steve Penney will be at the ready with their spatulas to flip those burgers!

Tickets available from the Tearoom - £5 each.

30 April

17.00
Goldsmiths 1
DMG Seminar: Antiferromagnetic coupling in EuO1-x and a magnetic polaron model for the enhanced Curie temperature

Jinke Tang (University of Wyoming)

29 April

11am
Goldsmiths1
Probing the 3D Structures by Rotation Electron Diffraction and Electron Microscopy

Prof. Xiaodong Zou
Berzelii Center EXSELENT on Porous Materials and Inorganic and Structural Chemistry, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, Stockholm

28 April

11am
Goldsmiths1
Bare, oxidized and thiolated metal clusters

Speaker: Henrik Gronbeck, Department of Applied Physics and Competence Centre for Catalysis, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.

Atomically precise metal clusters constitute a fascinating state of condensed matter with novel and tunable properties. The presentation will review our recent work on structural, electronic and chemical properties of metal clusters. In particular, the oxidation of small transition metal clusters will be discussed together with the structural and electronic properties of thiolate protected Au clusters. In all cases, comparisons with the corresponding bulk property will be made.

Thursday 24 April

1 - 2 pm
The Tea Room
LUNCHTIME QUIZ - Department Social Event

Come along and put your general knowledge to the test!
Enter your team to win cash prizes!
£2 per person includes snacks and nibbles.
Register your team (4-6 max) at the tea room counter by noon Wednesday 23 April.
Hosted by quiz-master Prof Bill Clyne.

Saturday 22 March

12.30pm-1.30pm
Goldsmiths1
Science Festival talk: Artificial Muscles

Speakers: members of the Active and Intelligent Materials Lab
This lecture outlines several types of material used to develop artificial muscles. We will use a wireless microscope to examine these structures in the lecture. The scattering of light from small soft-lithographic structures will be shown, and how the spacing of light-dots can be used to monitor very sensitively stretching and bending of a material.

Suitable for ages 12+.

Saturday 22 March

11am-12pm
Goldsmiths1
Science Festival talk: Steel: probably the best materials in the world

Speakers: Lucy Fielding and Ed Pickering, PhD students

Find out more about probably the most important material ever used - steel! Almost every man-made object in the world is either made from steel or has been made using it: steel is used to build our machines, vehicles and buildings, it is worshipped in some cultures, and it was the heart of the industrial revolution. This talk explores why steel is such an incredible material and how it will become even more vital to us in the future.

Suitable for ages 12+.

Wednesday 19 March 2014

18:30 hrs
TWI Ltd, Granta Park, Great Abington
CAMSoc: Welding and joining developments in the aerospace industry

This Cambridge and Anglian Materials Society presentation is a joint event with the Eastern Counties branch of The Welding Institute.

Richard Freeman from TWI Ltd is the speaker.

This presentation will cover developments in the welding of aluminium, titanium and nickel alloys for airframe and aircraft engine components by arc, laser, electron beam and friction based processes. Laser additive manufacture will also be covered in the talk, along with techniques for the joining of composite materials, and developments in non-destructive inspection. Finally a new development on the metallic coating of composite materials for lightning strike protection and thermal management will be shown.

PLEASE NOTE THIS MEETING WILL TAKE PLACE AT - TWI Ltd ( Room G3, Bevan Braithwaite Building), Granta Park, Great Abington, Cambridge CB21 6AL.

The presentation will commence at 6:30 PM, with a buffet available from 6:00 pm.

If you plan to attend, please contact Alan Shand (at Lloyds Register) who can also provide directions. Tel: 0207 423 2833 Email: alan.shand@lr.org

All welcome.

19/03/2014

5pm
Goldsmiths 1
DMG seminar: Obtaining high efficiency ZnO/Cu2O solar cells

Yulia Ievskaya

11th February

2pm
Goldsmiths1
Hierarchical structured and porous materials

Prof. Nikolai Denkov, Head, Department of Chemical Engineering, Sofia University

The Department of Chemical Engineering (DCE) of Sofia University has rich expertise in the area of physical chemistry of disperse systems (especially, surfactant solutions, foams and emulsions). This talk will present a brief overview of several studies, in which this expertise was used to generate novel structured or porous materials. First, the mechanism of “convective assembly” for production of 2D-colloid crystals in thin liquid films will be outlined, and the role of lateral capillary forces and water evaporation will be discussed. Second, the main factors controlling the formation of porous materials with hierarchical porous structure (in the nanometer to micrometer scale) will be discussed. Third, procedures for formation of stable dispersions of the so-called “phase-change materials” (used for energy storage and transportation) will be described. Some results of the last study allowed us to formulate with Dr. S. Smoukov a new research project “Control of particle shape in dispersions of phase-change materials”. The work on this project started recently and some non-trivial new results will be presented.

Thursday 6 March

1 - 2 pm
The Tea Room
LUNCHTIME QUIZ - Department Social Event

Come along and put your general knowledge to the test!
Enter your team to win cash prizes!
£2 per person includes snacks and nibbles.
Register your team (4-6 max) at the tea room counter by noon Wednesday 5 March.

05/03/2014

5pm
Goldsmiths 1
DMG seminar: Second harmonic current phase relation in spin filter Josephson structures

Avradeep Pal

25 February

2pm
Goldsmiths' 2
Nano Fiber production, scale-up, commercialization and applications

Miles Wright, the CEO of Xanofi Inc., will give a seminar on Technology and Entrepreneurship: “Nanofiber production, scale-up, commercialization and applications”. It will tell about the history of the breakthrough shear nanospinning method which is by far the most efficient nanofiber fabrication method. It will also detail some of the challenges (both technical and business) that had to be overcome to make it into a viable commercial technology.

The lecture is open to the public and everyone interested is welcome to attend.

Speaker’s bio: Miles Wright, CEO of the nanotechnology company Xanofi, is a successful business and entrepreneurial leader. Miles has founded five separate companies, served as CEO of two others, and participated on several company boards. For the last six years he has worked to commercialize advanced technology as Executive-in-Residence at North Carolina State University. He has co-founded two non-profit groups and continues to be actively involved in community organizing and relief programs.
People interested in meeting the speaker should contact the talk organizer.

21 February

11:15 am
Goldsmiths1
Novel defect structures in doped bismuth ferrites

Speaker: Dr. Ian MacLaren, University of Glasgow

Doping bismuth ferrite can have quite unexpected effects. I will talk about two particular kinds of non-stoichiometric defects that can be induced by Ti and Nd doping in bismuth ferrite. Firstly, I will discuss the formation of novel 2-atom wide nanorods of neodymium oxide, which will include the formation mechanism, the three dimensional atomic structure as reconstructed using combined electron microscopy and density functional theory, as well as preliminary predictions of their properties. Secondly, I will outline the formation of novel titanium-rich antiphase boundaries. As before, I will cover the reasons for their formation, their detailed atomic and chemical structure, and will show that these boundaries are charged. The effects of the charged boundaries are then analysed quantitatively in terms of their effect in polarising the surrounding material to stabilise a polar ordered pseudotetragonal region to either side of each boundary in an otherwise antiferroelectric matrix. Finally, the relevance of these findings to the thin film growth of bismuth ferrites and their derivatives will be discussed with examples from several UK groups.

The talk will last approx. 45 mins.

19/02/2014

5pm
Goldsmiths 1
DMG seminar: Mg-doped ZnO grown by atmospheric ALD for use in quantum dot solar cells

Robert Hoye

13 February

2pm
Goldsmiths2
Transferring Novel GaN Technologies to Manufacturing

ALL WELCOME!

Applied Lecture - MPhil in Micro and Nanotechnology Enterprise

Dr David Wallis, who works for Plessey Semiconductors and also has an affiliation to the Cambridge GaN Centre here in the department, will talk about "Transferring Novel GaN Technologies to Manufacturing". The talk will explain some of the challenges of taking novel crystal growth technologies for semiconductors (some of which were developed here in Cambridge) into a real product.

12 February

2.00-3.45pm
Goldsmiths1
Finding and making sense of resources for literature surveys

Yvonne Nobis (Moore and Central Science Libraries)

This session will cover locating peer reviewed academic articles in your subject area, using citation databases, and making sense of the results of your searches. It will be interactive so bring your laptops along, and the session is open to anyone who needs to do any type of literature review or survey.

Tuesday 11 February 2014

19.00 hrs
Goldsmiths 1
CAMSoc/IoM3 2014: Local heat of the Young Persons’ Lecture Competition

We have four entries in the competition this evening including both undergraduates and postdgraduates.

Drinks and nibbles will be from 6.30pm and the lectures will start at 7.00pm. Following the talks, we will return to the Tea Room for more drinks while we wait for the judges to make their decision.

All are welcome - please come along to support the competitors!

05/02/2014

5pm
Goldsmiths 1
DMG seminar: Spin transport in multilayer graphene

Wenjing Yan

5 February

2-3:30 pm
Pippard Lecture Theatre, Cavendish Laboratory
Reinventing Education

Please note change of venue from the Goldsmiths' Suite to the Pippard LT, Bragg Building, Cavendish Laboratory.

Anant Agarwal - President, edX, Professor, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, MIT

Digital technology has transformed countless areas of life from healthcare to workplace productivity to entertainment and publishing. But education hasn’t changed a whole lot. EdX is a MOOC (massive open online course) initiative founded by Harvard and MIT that aspires to reinvent education through online learning. EdX’s mission is to dramatically increase access to education for students worldwide, while substantially enhancing campus education in both quality and efficiency through blended models that incorporate the best of both online and in-person elements. This talk will provide an overview of MOO Cs and edX, and share student stories that reveal how they are increasing access to education worldwide. The talk will also discuss where MOOC technologies are headed, and how they can enhance campus education. Finally, the talk will provide some recent research results from some of the edX xConsortium university partners that will allow us to improve education online and on campus, and discuss how MOOCs might evolve in the future.
talks.cam listing

29 January

11am
A&B rooms
A mechanism-based model for creep of the superalloy RR1000

Dr. Sun (Rolls-Royce Corporation, Indianapolis) has a long history of working with superalloys, including some groundbreaking microscopy on the anomalous yield effect in Oxford.

Tuesday 21 January 2014

19.30 hrs
Goldsmiths 1
CAMSoc: Realising the SKYLON Spaceplane

Mark Hempsell
Reaction Engines Ltd

Currently every mission to space destroys a rocket costing between $45 million and $200 million and takes around three year to build. The vision of SKYLON is a fully reusable spaceplane that can take off from a runway like an aeroplane, reach orbit with 15 tonnes of cargo, and then return to land back on the runway. This will make access to space more available, more reliable and cheaper. The talk outlines the technologies that are being developed to achieve this vision by the early 2020s.

Light refreshments available from 19.00hrs

3rd Jan

12:15 pm
Tea Room
Welcome back - New Year drinks!

Department social: As a change from the usual Christmas event you are invited to celebrate the start of a successful 2014 by joining the Head of Department for drinks and nibbles.

Wednesday 11 December

19.30 hrs
Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy
CAMSoc: Bubbles-Particles-Capsules-Fibres at all scales!

Prof Mohan Edirisinghe
University College London

Light refreshments available at 19.00hrs

Wed 11 Dec

3pm
Goldsmiths 1
"Utilising Reflection High-Energy Electron Diffraction to Control Thin Film Growth and Structure"

Dr Sean R. C. McMitchell - University of Warwick

9 Dec 2013

11am
Goldsmiths2
Seminar: Load-sharing in delta-processed Inconel 718

T.M. Holden

04/12/2013

17.00
Goldsmiths 1
Epitaxial Oxide Spin-Filter Tunnel Junction

Bhagwati Prasad

3rd Dec 2013

17:00
Goldsmiths LT
2013 Holweck Prize Lecture: Coexistence of superconductivity and magnetism at the nanoscale

Professor Alexander Buzdin
(L’Université de Bordeaux, France)

The Holweck Medal and Prize is awarded by the Institute of Physics and the
Société Française de Physique. Professor Alexander Buzdin was awarded
the 2013 Holweck Medal and Prize for his pioneering theoretical studies of
superconductor-ferromagnet multilayer systems.

Lecture at 17.00
Reception at 18.15

The lecture is free to but REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED. To register and for more information please e-mail claudia.reidegeld@iop.org

27/11/2013

17.00
Goldsmiths 1
High resolution magnetoelectric imaging of perpendicular magnetization under ferroelectric control

Massimo Ghidini

Fri 22 November

4pm
Goldsmiths 1
Coherent Diffraction Imaging and Atomic Resolution Electron Tomography

Jianwei (John) Miao, UCLA

Tuesday 19 November 2013

19.30
Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy
CAMSoc: More Bang for your Buck – formulation and characterisation of explosive materials

Annette Glauser (nee Renouf - who some of you will remember as an undergraduate and postgraduate with us!)

Explosive materials are unique in their requirements for formulation and characterisation, needing to balance explosive performance, safety and mechanical properties. Other factors such as cost, ease of processing, legislation and environmental impacts must also be considered. Standard materials science techniques play a significant role in material and process down-selection, and valuable lessons can be learnt from the pharmaceutical industry in terms of powder handling and processing. Further ?specialist tests? are required to address explosive-specific requirements; some at the cutting edge of science, others would not be unfamiliar to early gunpowder pioneers. In this talk the challenges associated with explosive materials development will be discussed and the role a materials scientist can play in addressing these challenges will be explored.

Light refreshments available at 19.00 in the tearoom, lecture begins at 19.30.

13/11/2013

17.00
Goldsmiths 1
Electrocaloric materials and devices

Sam Crossley

05/11/2013

15.00
Goldsmiths 2
DMG Annual Group Meeting

October 17th, 2013

16:30
Goldsmith Room 2
Seminar: Surface plasmon coupling studies through near-field mapping of electromagnetic modes in electron microscopy

Surface plasmon coupling studies through near-field mapping of electromagnetic modes in electron microscopy

P.A. van Aken
Stuttgart Center for Electron Microscopy, Max-Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, Stuttgart, Germany

Miniaturization technology in optics has become an emerging field with the aim of overcoming the obstacle of the diffraction limit of light. Plasmons which are coherent collective oscillations of quasi-free electrons in a metal volume or surface provide exciting new options for information transfer in channels smaller than this diffraction limit. This presentation concentrates on different plasmonic phenomena which are observed in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) in combination with electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and energy-filtering TEM (EFTEM). This conjunction offers both high energy and high spatial resolution. Plasmonic coupling behaviour of electromagnetic fields at nanoholes and nanoparticles having rectangular, circular, triangular etc. shapes were investigated. The experimental results are cross-checked by different simulation techniques based on discrete dipole approximation (DDA), finite element method (FEM), and three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain methods (3D-FDTD). These techniques allow unveiling the precise electromagnetic field distribution. The hybridization of electromagnetic fields of closely spaced rectangular nanoslits was analysed in the framework of Babinet’s principle [1], and the presence of toroidal modes in a metal ring formed by an oligomer of holes was demonstrated for the first time [2,3]. Resonant wedge plasmon modes in a triangular nanoprism were observed [4], and symmetry breaking concepts are thoroughly discussed [3,5].

[1] B. Ögüt, R. Vogelgesang, W. Sigle, N. Talebi, C. T. Koch and P. A. van Aken: Hybridized metal slit eigenmodes as an illustration of Babinet's principle. ACS Nano 5 (2011) 6701-6706.
[2] B. Ö?üt, N. Talebi, R. Vogelgesang, W. Sigle, P.A. van Aken: Toroidal plasmonic eigenmodes in oligomer nanocavities for the visible. Nano Letters 12 (2012) 5239?5244.
[3] N. Talebi, B. Ö?üt, W. Sigle, R. Vogelgesang, P.A. van Aken: On the symmetry and topology of plasmonic eigenmodes in heptamer and hexamer nanocavities. Submitted to Applied Physics A (2013).
[4] L. Gu, W. Sigle, C. T. Koch, B. Ögüt, P. A. van Aken, N. Talebi, R. Vogelgesang, J. Mu, X. Wen and J. Mao: Resonant wedge-plasmon modes in single-crystalline gold nanoplatelets. Physical Review B 83 (2011) 195433.
[5] N. Talebi, W. Sigle, R. Vogelgesang, C.T. Koch, C. Fernández-López, L.M. Liz-Marzán, B. Ögüt, M. Rohm, P.A. van Aken: Breaking the mode degeneracy of surface plasmon resonances in a triangular system. Langmuir 28 (2012) 8867?8873.

Monday 1 July

11am
T001
A statistical theory of strain hardening in stage II and III

Prof Rafael Schouwenaars
Departamento de Materiales y Manufactura, DIMEI, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Méxic

27 June

4pm
T001
'Probing Plasmons with Electrons'

Prof Ulrich Hohenester (University of Graz)

19 June 2013

1.30-6.30pm
Cockcroft Lecture Theatre
Armourers and Brasiers Cambridge Forum

The Kelly Lecture for 2013 will be given by Prof Sir Colin Humphreys, CBE, FRS, FREng, Department of Materials Science & Metallurgy, University of Cambridge
http://www.msm.cam.ac.uk/forum/

14th June

5 pm
Downing College
Department Garden Party

This year the Garden Party will be held in Downing College (Grace Howard Room).
Admission will be by (pre-purchased) ticket only. These are available from reception or the tearoom, costing £5 each. The number of tickets is limited, and we anticipate a strong demand, so they will be sold on a strictly first come, first served basis. All members of the Department, plus all Part II & Part III students, are very welcome to attend. It's expected that the event will continue until about 8pm.

05/06/2013

5pm
T001
DMG Seminar: Magnetic solitons for data storage

Rhodri Mansell (Cavendish Laboratory)

30 May

2:15pm
T001
Less strained, more efficient blue LEDs with embedded silica hollow nanospheres

Professor Euijoon Yoon, President of Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology from Seoul National University.

Everyone invited.

29/05/2013

5pm
T001
DMG Seminar: Fully gapped superconductivity in a YBa2Cu3O7-x grain detected by a single electron transistor

David Gustafsson

15/05/2013

5pm
T001
DMG Seminar: Atmospheric Atomic Layer Deposition of Doped and Undoped ZnO for Solar Cells

Robert Hoye

Wednesday 15 May 2013

12.15-13.15
Babbage Lecture Theatre
Ten Materials Technologies to Transform the World

Presented by Larry L. Hench
University Professor of Engineering/Biomedical Engineering Program, Florida Institute of Technology Melbourne Florida
Professor and Director of Special Projects, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida
Professor Emeritus, University of Florida and Imperial College London
Visiting Professor, King’s College/Guy’s Hospital, University of London, UK

During June 21-22, 2010 a seminal Ceramic Leadership Summit was held in Baltimore, MD, hosted by the American Ceramic Society, to explore the major trends affecting the ceramics materials community world-wide. Throughout the Leadership Summit delegates from industry, government and academia heard the latest thinking from noted scientists, leaders, and colleagues on ways that innovative ceramics technologies can transform the world. During the closing session, Professor Hench, as Chair and Principal Speaker, attempted to connect the concepts, predictions, and provocations encountered from those thought leaders with input from nearly 400 American Ceramic Society members who participated in a survey about innovative materials technologies that are most likely to have a significant impact in the future. During this lecture Professor Hench will present an overview of the findings from the Leadership Summit and update the conclusions with his latest personal perspectives on new technical developments, the economic issues, socio-economic factors and feasibility of achieving breakthrough technologies in the years 2013-18. The emphasis will be on the following sectors of business: Energy, Environment and Healthcare. Innovative technologies that have the potential for being world-changing are discussed including: 1)Transforming Technology for Energy: Innovative Energy Storage Devices; 2)Transforming Technology for the Environment: Surface Functionalized Recycled Materials; 3)Transforming Technology for Healthcare: Bioactive Materials for Tissue Regeneration and Preventative Medicine.
Two critical questions are addressed:
• What are the most important breakthrough technologies that can produce an economic solution to energy, environment and healthcare issues?
• What are the scientific, socio-economic or political barriers that must be overcome to make these innovative technologies have an impact world-wide?

3rd May

3pm
T001
High-throughput Methods and In Situ EDXRD Studies for the Detailed Investigation of Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Compounds"

Professor Dr Norbert Stock from the Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Kiel, Germany

01/05/2013

5pm
T001
DMG Seminar: Functional Oxide Thin Films for New Generation Solar Cells using Atmospheric Atomic Layer Deposition

David Muñoz-Rojas

24th April

2.30 pm
T001
Characterizing Novel Deformation Mechanisms in Metallic Alloys

Prof Mike Mills, Ohio State University

All are welcome and for those of you not familiar with Mike's work his talk will be of interest to those working in Nickel and Titianium alloys, Steels and high resolution characterisation in general.

Mike is a very entertaining speaker and always has some spectacular images to show.

Wed 17 April

7 for 7:30pm
T001
CAMSoc: "Energy saving when manufacturing high value castings"

Speaker: Professor Mark Jolly, Cranfield University

Synopsis:

Compared with its output, the casting industry uses a disproportionate amount of energy as a result of the inefficient processes used. This talk highlights the melting processes that are used in some traditional foundries and identifies the energy burdens associated with them. A comparison is then made with the novel CRIMSON process to demonstrate where energy savings can be made. A test bar sample casting is investigated to demonstrate the advantage of energy saving by using this novel CRIMSON method which will help the foundry industry to reduce energy costs and promote competitiveness in the production of high value casting components.

All welcome. Light refreshments in the Tea Room from 7pm. Talk starts 7:30pm

Friday 12 April

11:30
T001
Novel synthesis and property of BN nanotube/nanosheet and their applications

Yoshio Bando, International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (WPI-MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Namiki, Tukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044, Japan

Boron nitride (BN) materials are attracting more and more attentions due to their constant and wide band gap independent of morphology, superb mechanical properties, very high thermal conductivity and marked chemical inertness. Recently, we developed effective methods for synthesis of large scale highly pure BN nanotubes and nanosheets. A special chemical vapor deposition method was developed to realize grams level synthesis of boron nitride nanotubes, which make it possible to initiate composite materials studies of boron nitride nanotubes. Thinner BN nanotubes with diameter smaller than 10 nm were fabricated successfully by optimizing the metal oxide used to react with boron source. Large scale BN nanosheets were also fabricated by the chemical blowing method. Subsequently, boron nitride nanotube's polymeric composites were fabricated with a couple of polymers as matrixes and their thermal, electrical and mechanical properties were evaluated. More than 20-fold thermal conductivity improvement in boron nitride nanotube-containing polymers was obtained, and such composites keep good electrical insulation. The composites possess decent overall-performance, as revealed by mechanical property and electrical insulation tests. In addition, in situ TEM measurements of mechanical and electrical properties of BN nanotubes and nanosheets have been successfully studied.

13 March 2013

7 for 7:30pm
T001
CAMSoc: "The next generation of lighting for our homes and our health"

The lecture will be presented by Professor Sir Colin Humphreys, Dept of Materials Science, University of Cambridge

As usual the meeting will begin with light refreshments in the Tea Room from 7pm. The lecture will start at 7.30 in T001.

All are welcome (including partners, parents and off-spring!)

01.03.2013

17:00-18:00
T001
Seminar

Speaker: Prof. G.N. Greaves, Distinguished Research Fellow at MSM
Title of Seminar: Zeolites, Amorphisation and Perfect Glasses

27/02/2013

5pm
T001
DMG Seminar: Solid-state cooling via electrically driven phase transitions

Sam Crossley

27 Feb

3pm
T001
SuperSTEM - probing materials one atom at a time

Dr Quentin Ramasse, from the SuperSTEM facility in Daresbury

Thursday 21 February 2013

4.00 pm
T001 Seminar Room (Arup Tower)
AN ASSESSMENT OF THE CONTRIBUTING FACTORS TO THE NANOSCALE STRUCTURAL REFINEMENT OF ADVANCED BAINITIC STEELS

Speaker - Dr Carlos Garcia-Mateo from MATERALIA Research Group Department of Physical Metallurgy, National Centre for Metallurgical Research (CENIM-CSIC), Spain.

Wednesday 20 February 2013

18:30
T001
CAMSoc / IoM3 2013 Young Persons' Lecture Competition

This event aims to judge the presentation skills of young Materials Scientists and their ability to communicate with a generalist audience a Materials-related topic of their choice. The Cambridge area has had success in previous years with a number of our presenters being selected to compete in regional heats and in the National Final (which this year will be held in April at the Armourers' Hall in London). Cash prizes are normally awarded to all competitors in the Cambridge heat.... The World Final this year will be held in Hong Kong.

The Lecture Competition will start at 6.30pm and we have excellent entries this year across a range of different research topics. The evening will start with light refreshments at 6.00pm and then following the competition we will return to the Tea Room for further refreshments while the judges go through the hard process of choosing a winner.

The competitors are as follows:

Ed Pickering
Ed Inns
Sneha Rhode
Fabien Massabuau

I do hope that many of you will be able to come along to support the competitors. I am sure that it will be a very interesting evening - which should be over by 8.30 pm approx., leaving plenty of time for a celebration afterwards!

Prof Serena Best, smb51@cam
Copy of rules and entry form

15 Feb 2013

5 pm
T001
Advances in Sustainable Batteries

Professor Jiakuan Yang - 5 to 5.30 pm
Mr Marcel Yiao - 5.30 - 6.00 pm

13/02/2013

5pm
T001
DMG Seminar: Control of spin-polarized supercurrents by manipulating magnetic states in ferromagnetic Josephson junctions

Niladri Banerjee

30/01/2013

5pm
T001
DMG Seminar: Tunable memristive behaviour in SrTiO3-Sm2O3 vertical heteroepitaxy nanostructure

Shin Buhm Lee

Wednesday 16th January

1:30pm
Austin LT
LEDs: from materials science to a greener planet

Dr Lewis Liu, Cambridge Centre for Gallium Nitride (GaN)

23 January 2013

7 for 7:30pm
T001
CAMSoc: Intelligent Nanomaterials - Will it Answer Energy Problems?

The lecture will be presented by Dr. Satheesh Krishnamurthy of the Open University.

As usual the meeting will begin with light refreshments in the Tea Room from 7pm. The lecture will start at 7.30 in T001. All are welcome to attend.

Tues 22nd Jan

11 am
T001
Alkali Metal Ion Extraction and Phase Transformations in Layered Transition Metal Oxides

Tadashi C. Ozawa
International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (WPI-MANA)
National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba, Japan

16/01/2013

5pm
T001
DMG Seminar: Piezoelectric polymer nanowires for energy harvesting

Richard Whiter

18 Dec

11:30
Babbage LT
Department Annual Meeting

Please come along to hear about new developments and the highlights of the year.

05/12/2012

5:00pm
T001
DMG Seminar: Spin-polarized tunnelling and transport in meso-scale few-layer graphene devices

Prasanta Muduli

04/12/12

7 for 7:30pm
T001
CAMSoc - "Multi-scale Mechanics in Tendon: Understanding Structure-Function Optimisation"

Dr Hazel Screen, Institute of Bioengineering, Queen Mary, University of London

Abstract
Tendon plays a fundamental role in locomotion, facilitating energy efficient movement. However, the roles of our different tendons vary significantly from energy storage as occurs in the Achilles through to tendons which provide dampening and can modulate muscle contraction to allow accurate positioning of the fingers. All tendons are composed of the same hierarchical collagen arrangement, so to meet these disparate functional requirements, structural and compositional optimisation is required. Research in our group has focused on characterising the mechanisms by which different types of tendon function to transfer load. We are also looking to understand the cell environment within these different tendons, to see if mechanotransduction cues differ. Long term, we hope these data will provide insights into functional specialisation across a range of aligned fibrous tissues, subsequently guiding efforts towards repair and regeneration.

As usual, light refreshments will be available in the Tea Room from 19:00 and all are welcome to attend.

Tues 4 Dec

10am
T001
Electric-field control of magnetic domain wall motion and local magnetization dynamics in ferromagnetic-ferroelectric heterostructures

Sebastiaan van Dijken

NanoSpin, Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University School of Science, P.O. Box 15100, FI-00076 Aalto, Finland

Spintronic devices currently rely on magnetic switching or controlled motion of domain walls by an external magnetic field or spin-polarized current. Achieving the same degree of magnetic controllability using an electric field has potential advantages including enhanced functionality and low power consumption. Here, an approach to electrically control local magnetic properties, including the writing and erasure of regular ferromagnetic domain patterns and the motion of magnetic domain walls, will be discussed [1-3]. The method is based on recurrent strain transfer from ferroelastic 90. stripe domains in ferroelectric media to continuous magnetostrictive films with negligible magnetocrystalline anisotropy. The dominance of the magnetoelastic anisotropy in these ferromagnetic-ferroelectric heterostructures causes full imprinting of the ferroelectric domain pattern into the ferromagnetic counterpart and strong pinning of ferromagnetic domain walls onto narrow ferroelastic boundaries. As a result, the spin rotation, width, and chirality of the magnetic domain walls can be accurately tuned by a change in the direction or strength of the applied magnetic field [4]. Moreover, optical polarization microscopy of both the ferromagnetic and ferroelectric domain structures reveals that domain correlations and strong inter-ferroic domain wall pinning are maintained in an applied electric field. This leads to unprecedented electric-field control over the formation of ferromagnetic domains and the lateral motion of magnetic domain walls, an accomplishment that opens the way to electric-field driven spintronics. The experiments in this work are complemented by micromagnetic simulations to elucidate the physics of interacting ferromagnetic-ferroelectric domain walls.

[1] T.H.E. Lahtinen, J.O. Tuomi, and S. van Dijken, Adv. Mater. 23, 3187 (2011)
[2] T.H.E. Lahtinen, J.O. Tuomi, and S. van Dijken, IEEE Trans. Magn. 47, 3768 (2011)
[3] T.H.E. Lahtinen, K.J.A. Franke, and S. van Dijken, Nature Scientific Reports 2, 258 (2012)
[4] K.J.A. Franke, T.H.E. Lahtinen, and S. van Dijken, Phys. Rev. B 85, 094423 (2012)

21/11/2012

5:00pm
T001
DMG Seminar: Thermal and electrical control of perpendicular magnetization

Massimo Ghidini

14 November

7 for 7:30pm
T001
Cambridge and Anglian Materials Society: Superconducting Spintronics: A Tantalizing Possibility for Dissipation-Free Logic

Dr. Jason Robinson, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Cambridge

As usual, the talk will be given in T001 at 7.30pm. Drinks and light refreshments will be available in the Tea Room from 7.00pm. All are welcome.

07/11/2012

5:00pm
T001
DMG Seminar: Electrocaloric and barocaloric effects in BaTiO3

Xavier Moya

Wed 31 Oct

4pm
Austin LT
Bulk Metallic Glasses: Biomedical applications and applications

Professor Inoue is one of the most cited materials scientists in the world. He has a distinguished research record on a wide range of advanced metallic materials for structural and functional applications. Above all, he is renowned for his world-leading work on metallic glasses, notably on developing new compositions, and on applications. He directed the Institute for Materials Research at Tohoku University in Sendai, Japan, and has just stepped down from being President of Tohoku University, where his term of office was extended so that he could direct the University's recovery from the earthquake and tsunami. Prof. Inoue is visiting Cambridge for a few weeks this term as an Overseas Fellow at Churchill College. This pair of related talks will focus on soft-magnetic and biomedical applications of bulk metallic materials and related nanocrystalline materials.

24/10/2012

5:15pm
T001
DMG Seminar: Reconstructions at complex oxide interfaces

Josee Kleibeuker

24/10/2012

4:30pm
T001
DMG AGM

Wed 24 Oct

4pm
Austin LT
Bulk Metallic Glasses: Soft-magnetic properties and applications

Professor Inoue is one of the most cited materials scientists in the world. He has a distinguished research record on a wide range of advanced metallic materials for structural and functional applications. Above all, he is renowned for his world-leading work on metallic glasses, notably on developing new compositions, and on applications. He directed the Institute for Materials Research at Tohoku University in Sendai, Japan, and has just stepped down from being President of Tohoku University, where his term of office was extended so that he could direct the University's recovery from the earthquake and tsunami. Prof. Inoue is visiting Cambridge for a few weeks this term as an Overseas Fellow at Churchill College. This pair of related talks will focus on soft-magnetic and biomedical applications of bulk metallic materials and related nanocrystalline materials.

16 Oct 2012

3pm
T001


Dr Chris Hammond (University of Leeds)

'William and Lawrence Bragg: The Most Extraordinary Collaboration in Science'

'The Bragg's collaboration, which led to the earliest determination of crystal structures and the joint award of the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1915, began in August 1912 and ended in August 1914. We have a unique record of the Braggs' work during this period in a number of laboratory exercise books (held in the University of Leeds and the Royal Institution in London) which enable us to trace the development of their ideas from the actual measurements made with the X-ray spectrometer to their sketch graphs, tables and notes and which form the basis of their published papers in the Proceedings of the Royal Society I hope to trace the circumstances by which this unique collaboration began and also to describe in some detail the content of the notebooks-which not only reveal clear evidence of the Braggs' physical and crystallographic insight but also their great experimental skills. Finally, I will present a recently (re)discovered letter, written by William Bragg to the vice-Chancellor of Leeds University in December 1914 in which he describes, with remarkable frankness, the progress in 'The New Science of X-ray Crystallography' to this date.'

26 Sep 2012

4:15pm
T001
Quantitative Methods for the Determination of Nanostructures using Sub-Ångström Electron Probes

Prof J. Etheridge

Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy and Dept of Materials Engineering,
Monash University, Australia


The advent of electron probes smaller than one Ångström in diameter is enabling data to be obtained selectively from atomic-scale volumes of a specimen. This offers the prospect of extracting information about the type, position and bonding of specific atoms within a specimen. This talk will describe the development and application of three different methods in quantitative imaging and diffraction using sub-Ångström electron probes and will illustrate these with a range of applications, such as the measurement of the shape and surface facets of nanoparticles; the atomic structure of alloy precipitates; the long-range diamond and chessboard nanostructures in lithium-based titanate perovskites; and the bonding charge distribution in aluminium.
The talk will cover briefly methods to interpret the absolute intensity and contrast in atomic-resolution annular dark-field (ADF) scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) images, without recourse to any adjustable parameters; new STEM imaging methods using detectors located in a plane conjugate to the specimen, rather than the diffraction plane; and quantitative methods in convergent beam electron diffraction for the determination of structure and bonding in crystals.

Fri 13 July

10am
T001
Ferroic and multiferroic phase transitions from the perspectives of strain and elasticity

Michael Carpenter, Dept. of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge

Most phase transitions involving atomic displacements, development of ferroelectric dipoles or magnetic moments, changes in electronic structure, superconductivity, etc., involve some lattice distortion. This can be described formally in terms of coupling between strain and the driving order parameter. There are three general consequences. Firstly, typical changes in strain of ~0.001-0.01 can result in changes of the elastic constants of 10.s of %. Secondly, if changes in a ferroelectric order parameter, say, induce some strain and changes in a magnetic order parameter also induce a strain, it is inevitable that the ferroelectric and magnetic ordering processes are coupled via a common strain. This is likely to be an important coupling mechanism in multiferroic (ferroelastic, (anti)ferroelectric, (anti)ferromagnetic) materials. Thirdly, most phase transitions involve the development of some microstructure and this, too, can give rise to changes in elastic properties. In particular, under a dynamic stress ferroelastic twin walls can be mobile and their motion will give rise to characteristic patterns of acoustic attenuation.

These strain-related phenomena can be investigated by Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy, which involves measurement of the acoustic resonant modes of mm-sized single crystal or polycrystalline samples at frequencies of ~0.1-2 MHz. Elastic and anelastic properties can be investigated in the temperature range 5-1500 K and it is possible also to apply a large magnetic field in the low temperature range. Examples of transitions investigated in this way will described, including octahedral tilting transitions in SrZrO3 perovskite, ferroelectric and relaxor behaviour in PZN-PT and PMN, magnetic transitions in Fe2O3 and charge ordering transitions in (Pr,Ca)MnO3.

Wed 4 July

5 pm (25 mins + 5 mins Qs)
T001
DMG seminar: Superconducting spin-triplet spin-valves

Chris Smiet

28th June

9:30 am to 2:45 pm
T001
MPhil Seminars 2012 - 2

See posters around Department for details - all welcome

27 June 2012

2.00-6.30pm
Babbage Lecture Theatre
Armourers and Brasiers Cambridge Forum

The Fourteenth Kelly Lecture will be given at the Forum by Dr Alan Taub, VP for Research, General Motors. The title of his talk will be: "Materials Challenges for a Sustainable Automotive Industry"
http://www.msm.cam.ac.uk/forum/

27th June

9:30 am to 12:35 pm
T001
MPhil Seminars 2012 - 1

See posters around Department for details - all welcome

26th June

11:30-1
T001
Postgraduate Seminars and Posters 2012 - 2

See posters around Department for details - all welcome

25/06/2012

3pm, 1 hour
T001
3D EDS Microanalysis by FIB-SEM: limitations, potential and perspectives

Pierre Burdet, Interdisciplinary Centre for Electron Microscopy (CIME), Federal Institute of Technology of Lausanne (EPFL)

25th June

11:30-1
T001
Postgraduate Seminars and Posters 2012 - 1

See posters around Department for details - all welcome

Wed 20 June

5 pm (25 mins + 5 mins Qs)
T001
DMG seminar: Tunnel junctions with GdN

Avradeep Pal

15th June

5 pm
Downing College
Department Garden Party

This year the Garden Party will be held in Downing College, on the lawn outside the Howard Building (or in the Howard Building if wet). It's expected that the event will continue until about 8pm.

Admission will be by (pre-purchased) ticket only. These will be available for purchase at the Department Reception, from midday Wednesday 6th June. They will cost £6 each. The number of tickets is limited, and we anticipate a strong demand, so they will be sold on a strictly first come, first served basis. All members of the Department, plus all Part II & Part III students, are very welcome to attend.

Wed 13 June

2 pm (25 mins + 5 mins Qs)
T001
DMG seminar: Resitive RAM

Akihito Sawa
AIST
Tsukuba
Japan

Resistive switching phenomena in metal oxides have been intensively studied in recent years, because of the potential for nonvolatile memory application, i.e. resistance random access memory (ReRAM). The main mechanism of the resistive switching phenomena is a nanoionic redox reaction triggered by Joule heating or electrochemical migration of oxygen vacancies. Since chemical alterations of materials are inevitably induced in both mechanisms, there is concern for the reliability, such as the data retention and endurance. As a solution of this problem, resistive switching based on an electronic mechanism is being considered. Ferroelectric resistive switching effects based on polarization reversal are practically attractive, because polarization reversal does not induce a chemical alteration. We have developed a ferroelectric resistive switching device consisting of a multiferroic BiFeO3. The devices showed hysteretic current-voltage (I-V) characteristics, i.e., a resistive switching phenomenon. We also succeeded in resistive switching by pulsed-voltage applications. The devices showed endurance of >105 cycles and data retention of >105 s. These results demonstrate promising prospects for application of the ferroelectric resistive switching effect at BFO interfaces to nonvolatile memory.

31st May

12:45
Tea Room - level 4
MS&M Jubilee BBQ!

Materials Science invites you to celebrate the Queens Diamond Jubilee

Come along to the RED, WHITE, and BLUE BBQ

being held in the Canteen on the 31st May 2012 from 12.45 onwards

Tickets are £2.50 each which will include a burger (meat or veggie) and a doughnut

Soft drinks will be available

Tickets go on sale from Reception and the Canteen on Monday 14th May and will be limited in numbers. (Please let them know if you require a vegetarian burger at time of ticket purchase).

Wed 30 May

5 pm (25 mins + 5 mins Qs)
T001
DMG seminar: Spintronic devices with highly spin-polarised manganite electrodes and graphene channels

Lee Phillips

Wed 30 May 2012

2:30pm
T001
The Physics of Airline Security

Professor Peter Rez
Department of Physics
Arizona State University

"The vast majority of passengers want to arrive safely at their destination. Various systems have been deployed to detect explosives in checked baggage and to intercept passengers carrying guns and explosives. To understand how these systems work I shall review the physics of metal detection and X-ray scattering. In response to the underwear bomber the authorities have introduced body scanner machines, based on either mm wave scattering or backscattering of X-rays, at a number of airports. I shall give a brief review of my work on X-ray based body scanners and show how I calculated the dose from published images. I shall also discuss reasons why it is so difficult to accurately measure the dose from these machines and give an analysis of whether these machines are effective for detecting explosives. Continuing on this theme I shall conclude with an analysis of reasonable detection thresholds. "

23 May 2012

10 am
T001
High Performance Steels: Initiative and Practice

In order to meet the progressive requirements for the performance of steels, the author proposed novel microstructures featured with multi-phase, meta-stable and multi-scale (so-called as M3) for the targeted properties for different steel grades applied in various circumstances. In this talk, three prototype steels with unconventional performance are introduced as examples. The 3rd generation high strength low alloyed (HSLA) steels developed has the improved impact toughness of ?200 J at -40 ? and/or elongation of ? 20% while the yield strength maintains at 800-1000 MPa; the third generation advanced high strength steels (AHSS) exhibits excellent formability for automobiles, which is characterized by the product of the tensile strength and the elongation, Rm×A, higher than 30 GPa% when the tensile strength, Rm, ranges from 1000 MPa to 1500 MPa. New heat resistant martensitic steels were also developed with improved creep strength at 650 ? more than 90 MPa. The relationship between the designed microstructures and the targeted prosperities are discussed. It is expected that these new steels developed may remarkably improve the safety and reliability of steel products in service for infrastructures, automobiles and fossil power station in the future.

18th May 2012

10.00 am - 12 noon
T001
X-ray crystallography with the Free Electron Laser

Prof. John Spence (Arizona State University)

(With a brain-storming session after his talk to explore a possible application for beam-time at the Stanford LCLS.)

17 May 2012

7 for 7:30pm
T001
CAMSoc - HIGH EFFICIENCY III-V SOLAR CELLS: PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE

III-V solar cells have a long track record, starting with the Russian Venera missions to Venus in the 1960s, and are now used for almost all communication satellites. III-V semiconductors can be fabricated to produce multi-junction devices that span the solar spectrum; the current world record for solar power conversion (December 2011) is 37.9% for a triple junction solar cell under one sun illumination. For fundamental thermodynamic reasons, the efficiency of these solar cells rises under increased concentration, so the highest efficiency concentrator solar cell (illustrated) presently operates at 43.2%. At such efficiencies, large scale, terrestrial solar power generation using concentrator systems in the deserts becomes feasible. The technological developments underpinning these achievements will be discussed, together with an outlook of the present challenges and likely near term progress.

As usual the lecture will start at 7.30pm and refreshments will be available in the Tea Room from 7.00pm. All are welcome to attend - we look forward to seeing you there.
CAMSoc lectures on talks.cam

Wed 16 May

5 pm (25 mins + 5 mins Qs)
T001
DMG seminar: Chemical Strategies in Nanoscience

Stan S. Wong
Stony Brook
New York
USA

Friday, 11th May 2012

2 pm to 4 pm
Small Lecture Theatre, Cavendish Laboratory
NanoDTC Science Afternoon

Talks and Presentations:
"Artificial cells in picoliter droplets" - Prof. Wilhelm Huck, Radboud University Nijmegen
"Role of nanomaterials in healthcare sensors"? - Prof. James McLaughlin, OBE, Nanotechnology and Integrated Bioengineering Centre, University of Ulster
Series of short nano research highlights presented by NanoDTC 2nd year PhD students.

Wed 9 May

5 pm (25 mins + 5 mins Qs)
T001
DMG seminar: Stochastic behaviour of magnetic domain walls in nanostripes

Jose Prieto

Wed 25 April 2012

7 for 7:30pm
T001
CAMSoc - ENGINEERING CHALLENGES IN ANTARCTICA

Mike Rose, British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge

Light refreshments from 19:00. All welcome
CAMSoc on talks.cam.ac.uk

24 April

1-2pm
Tea Room
CANCELLED - Lunchtime Pub Quiz!

The Social Committee invite you to pit your General Knowledge against others in this Lunchtime Pub Quiz

Register your team at Reception before the 23rd April to enter

Entry fee: £1 per person
teams of 4-6
nibbles to be served, bring your own drinks (no alcoholic drinks allowed due to Dept regulations)

CASH PRIZES to be won!!!

17/03/2012

10 am - 5 pm
Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy
Cambridge Science Festival - Breaking Boundaries

10 am - 11 am, 12 noon - 1 pm: Ten things you didn't know about ice cream
2 pm - 3 pm: Superconductors: the superheroes of science
2 pm - 5 pm: SeeK (Science and Engineering Experiments for Kids)
2 pm -5 pm: Explore the world through materials
4 pm - 5 pm: Learning from the best: mimicking nature's materials

16th Mar, 2012

11 am
T001
Materials with anisotropic and "negative" elastic properties: meta-analysis and atomistic modelling

Dr. Arnaud Marmier
School of Engineering, Computer Sciences and Mathematics, University of Exeter

All are welcome!

Elastic properties have received a resurgence of interest in the last decades, triggered by the discovery of "negative" properties (Poisson's ratio and Linear Compressibility). The fact that these properties are negative is usually described as anomalous, but more and more materials are discovered that posses a negative Poisson's ratio, usually in a direction without special symmetry. One of the reasons that negative elastic properties still appear unusual is that the formalism of elastic theory, while conceptually simple, does not lend itself well to the representation of properties, especially off-axis. And at present, there are no easily available, convenient to use, method of calculating elastic properties in any direction. In this seminar I will first describe the theory of elasticity in anisotropic media through the tensor formalism and discuss the ElAM computer code (Elastic Anisotropy Measures), which can represent a variety of elastic properties in any direction. I will then present simple case studies based on a re-examination of published results, and show that around one third of all materials exhibit a negative Poisson's ratio, and that negative linear compressibility is a relatively rare property. Finally, I will discuss the use of atomistic modelling techniques (classical and quantum) to calculate elastic properties of crystals and to understand the mechanism responsible for the "negative" properties. The crystals investigated are platinum sulphide, chalcogenides glasses and zeolites.

1. Marmier A, Kohary K, Wright CD, Appl. Phys. Lett. 2011, 98, 231911. 2. Lethbridge ZAD, Walton RI, Marmier ASH, Smith CW, Evans KE, Acta Materialia, 2010, 58, 6444. 3. Marmier A, Ntoahae PS, Ngoepe PE, Pettifor DG, Parker SC, Phys. Rew. B 2010, 81, 172102.

Thursday 15 March

11 am - 12 noon
Austen Building LT
EM Group Advanced TEM lecture series - TEM applied to Nanomaterials

The Electron Microscopy Group is pleased to offer a series of eight lectures on Advanced TEM.

These lectures are open to all members of the Department, and are likely to be of interest to PhD students and postdoctoral research workers. Please feel free to come to all the lectures, or just those of particular interest.

Speaker: Dr Cate Ducati

Tuesday 13 March

11 am - 12 noon
Austen Building LT
EM Group Advanced TEM lecture series - Electron Tomography

The Electron Microscopy Group is pleased to offer a series of eight lectures on Advanced TEM.

These lectures are open to all members of the Department, and are likely to be of interest to PhD students and postdoctoral research workers. Please feel free to come to all the lectures, or just those of particular interest.

Speaker: Professor Paul Midgley

Friday 9 March

11 am - 12 noon
Austen Building LT
EM Group Advanced TEM lecture series - Image and spectral analysis

The Electron Microscopy Group is pleased to offer a series of eight lectures on Advanced TEM.

These lectures are open to all members of the Department, and are likely to be of interest to PhD students and postdoctoral research workers. Please feel free to come to all the lectures, or just those of particular interest.

Speaker: Dr Francisco De la Pena

Thurs 08 March 2012

7 for 7:30pm
T001
CAMSoc - Prospects for economic CCS using mineral carbonation

Michael Priestnall, Cambridge Carbon Capture.

Geological sequestration of captured CO2 is an energy intensive process and will also require large-scale integrated infrastructure. Mineral carbonation is the leading alternative to geo-CCS; while similarly expensive and energy intensive, it can be applied stand-alone, and potentially profitably, at small scale. The process mirrors the spontaneous steps of the natural carbon-silicate cycle in which atmospheric CO2 dissolves in water and reacts with eroded magnesium and calcium silicate rocks and solutions to deposit magnesium and calcium carbonates. The key challenge to making mineral carbonation an economically feasible process, at large-scale, is the energy and/or chemicals input required to speed-up and make Mg/Ca available for carbonation - some of the potential approaches will be described. At small-scales there are increasing business opportunities to drive economic feasibility through the value of materials and by-products, and through a novel combination of mineral carbonation with alkaline fuel cells.

Light refreshments from 19:00. All welcome
CAMSoc on talks.cam.ac.uk

Thu 8 March

5pm
T001
Spintronic devices with fullerenes

Former DMG member, Luis E. Hueso

CIC nanoGUNE, San Sebastian, Spain
IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, Bilbao, Spain

Organic and carbon-based materials have recently caught the attention of spintronics, and significant efforts are being made towards their integration in this field. One of their most attractive aspect for spintronic applications is the weakness of their spin scattering mechanisms, implying that the spin polarization of the carriers can be maintained for a very long time in these materials. Noticeably, spin relaxation times of microseconds have been reported by different resonance techniques, values exceeding by orders of magnitude the characteristic times detected in inorganic materials. Moreover, these materials have tunable chemical properties, opening a way for the integration of synthetic chemistry into spintronic devices.

In this talk I shall focus on spin transport with C60 fullerenes. In the first part, I will show how C60 acts as a spacer in hybrid ferromagnetic/organic spin valves. I will present room temperature magnetoresistance data that can be explained in the framework of a multistep tunneling regime.

In the second part I will introduce a magnetic tunnel transistor with C60 as a collector. In this novel device, hot-electron magnetoconductance values of up to 90% at room temperature have been recorded. Moreover, this magnetoconductance can be increased to any arbitrarily high value by suppressing the non-spin polarized current flowing in the device.

Thursday 8 March

11 am - 12 noon
Austen Building LT
EM Group Advanced TEM lecture series - STEM

The Electron Microscopy Group is pleased to offer a series of eight lectures on Advanced TEM.

These lectures are open to all members of the Department, and are likely to be of interest to PhD students and postdoctoral research workers. Please feel free to come to all the lectures, or just those of particular interest.

Speaker: Dr Jon Barnard

7th March

17.00, 25 minute talk and 5 minutes of questions
T001
DMG Seminar

Dr Mehmet Egilmez

Proximity Inducted Triplet Superconductivity in Half-Metallic La0.7Ca0.3MnO3

Tuesday 6 March

11 am - 12 noon
Austen Building LT
EM Group Advanced TEM lecture series - HREM

The Electron Microscopy Group is pleased to offer a series of eight lectures on Advanced TEM.

These lectures are open to all members of the Department, and are likely to be of interest to PhD students and postdoctoral research workers. Please feel free to come to all the lectures, or just those of particular interest.

Speaker: Dr Cate Ducati

02/03/2012

11am
Gordon Seminar Room
EBSD talk - II

Speaker: Fabio Di Giocchino: PhD Researcher- School of Materials, The University of Manchester.

Fabio will talk about the capability of EBSD technique in quantitative analyses for strain measurement and the calculation of Geometrically Necessary Dislocation (GND) density and heterogeneous plastic deformation assessment using EBSD.

Everyone welcome.

Thursday 1 March

11 am - 12 noon
Austen Building LT
EM Group Advanced TEM lecture series - Electron Diffraction

The Electron Microscopy Group is pleased to offer a series of eight lectures on Advanced TEM.

These lectures are open to all members of the Department, and are likely to be of interest to PhD students and postdoctoral research workers. Please feel free to come to all the lectures, or just those of particular interest.

Speaker: Dr Alex Eggeman

29th February

17.00, 25 minute talk and 5 minutes of questions
T001
DMG Seminar

Alexey Bannykh

Proximity effect in planar Josephson junctions

29/02/2012

12 noon
T501
EBSD talk - I

Speaker: Dr. Rebecca Higginson: Senior Lecturer and Materials Engineering Programme Director - Department of Materials - Loughborough University

With more than 20 years experience in EBSD, Rebecca will give an overview of the EBSD technique and its applications in physical metallurgy including microstructure/microtexture characterisation and phase identification in various materials.

Everyone welcome.

Tuesday 28 February

11 am - 12 noon
Austen Building LT
EM Group Advanced TEM lecture series - Electron Holography

The Electron Microscopy Group is pleased to offer a series of eight lectures on Advanced TEM.

These lectures are open to all members of the Department, and are likely to be of interest to PhD students and postdoctoral research workers. Please feel free to come to all the lectures, or just those of particular interest.

Speaker: Dr James Loudon

24 February

9-5
St John's College
Cambridge Carbon Nanotechnology Society Symposium 2012

The invited speakers are:
Prof. A. H. Windle (Cambridge)
Dr. Ian Kinloch (Manchester)
Prof. W. I. Milne (Cambridge)
Dr. A. Kholbystov (Nottingham)
Prof. R. Silva (Surrey)

Prizes will be given to the best posters, for more details check: www.camcntsoc.org

The cost of the conference (£10.00, if you register NOW - £15 on the day) includes Lunch and 2 Coffee breaks. There's also the possibility to attend to a dinner at an extra cost.
Register now...

23rd Feb

2pm
T001
"Substrate Engineering for Nanotube Growth Control"

Prof. Mark Schulz from the University Of Cincinnati, Nanoworld Laboratory. Mark is the head of the leading group on the longest nanotubes arrays produced by CVD (22 mm thick).

All welcome!

Thursday 23 February

11 am - 12 noon
Austen Building LT
EM Group Advanced TEM lecture series - Specimen preparation and FIB

The Electron Microscopy Group is pleased to offer a series of eight lectures on Advanced TEM.

These lectures are open to all members of the Department, and are likely to be of interest to PhD students and postdoctoral research workers. Please feel free to come to all the lectures, or just those of particular interest.

Speaker: Dr Jon Barnard

15th February

17.00, 25 minute talk and 5 minutes of questions
T001
DMG Seminar

David Bosworth

Structural control of carbon nickel thin films using ionized magnetron sputter deposition.

7th Feb

6pm for 6:30pm
Tearoom/T001
Cambridge heat of the 2012 IoM3 Lecture Competition

The Cambridge heat of the IoM3 Lecture Competition will take place here in the Department on Tuesday 7th February. We have four entries this year, including both undergraduate and postgraduate speakers.

Refreshments will be available in the Tea Room from 6.00pm and the competition will begin at 6.30pm in T001. Following the talks, we will return to the Tea Room for a bit more to eat and drink while the judges make their decision.

I hope that you will come along to support the speakers.

With all best wishes
Serena.

1st February

17.00, 25 minute talk, 5 minutes of questions
T001
DMG Seminar

Dr Massimo Ghidini

Non-volatile thermal and electrical control of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

1st February

16:30-18:00
LR4, Dept of Engineering, Trumpinton St
Nuclear Industry - How the past has shaped us and the future leadership challenges

Chris Ball, Head of Nuclear, Atkins plc

Part of the MPhil in Nuclear Energy seminar series but is open to all staff and students of the University - see the CNEC website for more talks in the series.
CNEC seminars

25 January 2012

1630-1800
Dept of Engineering, LR4 Baker Building
Creep Energy Theory and it use in Fuel Management and Optimisation

Dr Sergei Pelykh, Odessa National Polytechnic University

A series of lectures by experts from the nuclear sector have been organised as part of the MPhil in Nuclear Energy but are open to all staff and students of the University who are interested in nuclear energy topics.
CNEC seminar webpages

24th Jan

1 - 2pm
Tea Room
Lunchtime Pub Quiz!

The Social Committee invite you to pit your General Knowledge against others in this year's first Tuesday Lunchtime Pub Quiz

Register your team at Reception before the 23rd January to enter

Entry fee: £1 per person
teams of 4-6
nibbles to be served, bring your own drinks (no alcoholic drinks allowed due to Dept regulations)

CASH PRIZES to be won!!!

Friday 13 January 2012

9.00 am to 5.30am
Lecture Room 0, Dept of Engineering
Geometry in Science - One Day Meeting

One Day Meeting, "Geometry in Science" on Friday 13 January 2012 from 9.00am to 5.30pm. Venue: Lecture Theatre 0, Department of Engineering, Trumpington Street, Cambridge, CB2 1PZ

A one day scientific meeting covering "geometry" in various senses, both as aspects of mathematics and to illustrate the many ways that scientists use geometric thinking - open to all who are interested

Organiser: Professor Jim Woodhouse

Speakers: Professor Sir Michael Berry FRS - (Department of Physics, University of Bristol), The singularities of light: intensity, phase, polarization; Professor Chris Calladine FRS - (Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge), Some spiral structures in biology;
Professor Jan Koenderink - (Man-Machine Interaction Group, Delft University of Technology) Pictorial space: A geometry of visual awareness; Professor Gabriel Paternain - (Department of Pure Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics, University of Cambridge) Contact geometry in dynamics: the 3-body problem; Professor Denis Weaire FRS (School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin) The geometry of foam packings

Entry is free and open to all who are interested.

A buffet lunch will be available at a cost of £4.00 in advance or £5.00 on the day. Numbers for the luncheon are limited and an advance purchase of a luncheon voucher is recommended to guarantee a place.

NB the first 120 Fellows of the Society to apply will be offered a complimentary lunch voucher.

Further information can be obtained from the Society's website http://www.cambridgephilosophicalsociety.org or alternatively contact the Executive Secretary at the address below for a full programme and lunch voucher.
For more information

15th December

7:30-11pm
Downing College
Department Christmas Party

Buffet and Bar
Live Band

Thurs 8 Dec 2011

7 for 7:30pm
T001
CAMSoc - THERMAL SPRAY COATING DEVELOPMENTS AT TWI

Heidi Lovelock, Section Manager, Surfacing at TWI will present an overview of the current research topics being addressed in the thermal spray and cold spray process groups, and will touch on TWI's future ambitions as regards establishing new coating process capabilities.

Topics addressed will range from photocatalytic coatings for solar water-splitting devices, to novel coating compositions for protecting wave and tidal energy generation devices from the effects of corrosion and biofouling.

The capabilities of TWI's new technology for the thermal spray coating of composites (CompoSurfT) will also be described

Light refreshments from 19:00. All welcome.
CAMSoc on talks.cam.ac.uk

6/12/2011

15:00
Austin
Measuring phonon behaviour with electron diffraction

Dr Alex Eggeman,
Electron Microscopy Group
Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy
University of Cambridge

01/12/11

see posters
Postgraduate seminars

This year, we are holding an extra morning of First Year Student
Seminars, on Thursday 1 December, so that some of the people who were not able to speak at the main event in June, can give their talks this time.

The schedule will shortly be on display around the Department.

All welcome

Rosie Ward

Wednesday 30th November

16.00, 25 minute talk, 5 minutes for questions
T001
DMG Seminar: Enhanced tunability and ferroelectricity of Ba0.6Sr0.4TiO3-Sm2O3 vertically aligned nanocomposites via strain manipulation

Oon Jew Lee
Device Materials Group

29/11/2011

12:00
Austin
Bespoke microlenses for high-efficiency light-gathering applications

Dr Vlad Stolojan
Advanced Technology Institute
University of Surrey

25 Nov

2-3pm
Harker 2 lecture room, Dept Earth Sciences
The effect of high-pressure on ABO3 perovskite-type oxides: Ferroelastics, ferroelectrics & multiferroics

Jens Kreisel (CNRS, Grenoble)

The understanding of ABO3 perovskite remains one of the most challenging topics at the interface between solid state chemistry and solid state physics. The use of pressure for the investigation of perovskites has remained relatively rare, also due to the experimental difficulties, which have now been overcome for a number of years. As a consequence, we observe an evolution of high-pressure studies from a “niche” activity, reserved to some experts, to an increasingly important activity. In my presentation I will first recall the perovskite structure and the relation between the different structural distortions and physical properties. I will then discuss the pioneer rules of Samara [1] which have guided for years the interpretation of the effect of high-pressure on perovskites. In the second part of the talk I will focus on our own observations by high-pressure Raman scattering and synchrotron scattering experiments of three classes of perovskites : (i) Ferroelastics, such as LaAlO3, SrTiO3 & CaTiO3 [2-5], (ii) Classic ferroelectrics like PbTiO3 [6-7] and, in some more detail, (iii) The multiferroic BiFeO3 [8-9]. These different examples will allow discussing in more general terms the effect of high-pressure on octahedra tilting, cation displacement and the competition between these two instabilities

[1] G. A. Samara, T. Sakudo, K. Yoshimitsu, Phys. Rev. Lett. 35, 1767 (1975). [2] P. Bouvier, J. Kreisel, J. Phys.: Cond. Matt. 14, 3981 (2002). [3] M. Guennou, P. Bouvier, G. Garbarino, J. Kreisel, J. Phys.: Cond. Matt. 23, 395401 (2011). [4] M. Guennou, P. Bouvier, J. Kreisel, D. Machon, Phys. Rev. B 81 , 054115 (2010). [5] M. Guennou, P. Bouvier, B. Krikler, J. Kreisel, R. Haumont, Phys. Rev. B 82 , 134101 (2010). [6] P.-E. Janolin, P. Bouvier, J. Kreisel et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 237601 (2008). [7] I. A. Kornev, L. Bellaiche, P. Bouvier, B. Dkhil, J. Kreisel, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 196804 (2005). [8] R. Haumont, P. Bouvier, J. Kreisel et al. Phys. Rev. B 79 , 184110 (2009). [9] M. Guennou, P. Bouvier, G. S. Chen, R. Haumont, J. Kreisel, Phys. Rev. B, accepted (2011).

24 Nov

2:30pm
T001
Development of nanomaterials and bulk metallic glasses with high strength and high ductility: concept, processing, design and applications

Professor Jian LU

College of Science and Engineering, City University of Hong Kong

The ability to create structural materials of high yield strength and yet high ductility has been a dream for materials scientists for a long time. We summarize the recent developments of the advanced nanomaterials and BMGs with exceptional mechanical properties. The basic concept of surface nanocrystallization of materials will be introduced. The computational models successfully simulate the enhanced ductility and strength and provide valuable information about the failure mechanisms of the nanostructured material. Based on the new concepts developed for toughening the high strength materials and the multiscale solid mechanics design tools, different new categories of nanomaterials and BMGs have been processed and realized. The development of materials and structures with nano-, micro- and macro-scale functional gradients for generating different toughening mechanisms using the non localization approach will be presented. The applications in different industrial sectors (automotive, biomedical, civil structure, aerospace, energy) can be anticipated.

24 Nov

1pm
T001
Raman spectroscopy: Probing the structure & physics of functional materials by atomic vibrations

Jens Kreisel, Lab. Matériaux et Génie Physique @ Minatec

The aim of the presentation will be to provide an overview to the investigation of functional materials by Laser Raman spectroscopy (RS). Raman scattering is the inelastic scattering of light by a material that allows probing fundamental excitations such as phonons (atomic vibrations), magnons (magnetic coupling), electromagnons etc.

Raman Spectroscopy (experimental discovery 1928, Nobel Prize 1930) can be considered as a local probe, as will be described in the talk. A Raman spectrum provides a unique fingerprint for a given material in terms of its chemical composition, crystal structure, but also its electronic and magnetic properties. RS is now extensively used as a non-perturbing probe of functional materials, be it as crystals, ceramics, thin or ultra thin films, or nano-composites.

After a short introduction to the basic concept and characteristics of RS, I will illustrate the versatility of Raman spectroscopy through examples of various materials at 0D, 1D, 2D & 3D, ranging from Si nanowires and phase change materials to multiferroic nanostructures. A specific emphasis will then be put on the investigation of functional oxides, namely the study of atomic vibrations for the understanding of both structural and physical phase transitions. An outlook into current and future trends in Raman scattering will conclude the presentation.

Wednesday 16th November

16.00, 25 minute talk, 5 minutes for questions
T001
DMG Seminar: Electrically driven magnetization reversal with no applied magnetic field

Massimo Ghidini
Device Materials Group

11/11/11

15:00
T001
Intermetallic Compounds - Materials for a Knowledge-Based Development in Heterogeneous Catalysis

Dr Mark Armbrüster

Tues 8 Nov 2011

7 for 7:30pm
T001
CAMSoc - MIXING LIGHTNING WITH WATER TO GET THE MOST OUT OF ALUMINIUM

Dr James Curran, Keronite International Ltd and Royal Society Industry Fellow, University of Cambridge

Light refreshments from 19:00. All welcome.
CAMSoc on talks.cam.ac.uk

08/11/2011

15:00
T001
When nano meets bio: Interdisciplinary applications of electron microscopy

Professor Martin Saunders

Wednesday 2nd November

16.30 start, 25 minute talk, 5 minutes for questions
T001
DMG Seminar: Electrocaloric materials and refrigeration cycles

Emmanuel Defaÿ
Device Materials Group

Wed 19 Oct 2011

7 for 7:30pm
T001
CAMBRIDGE AND ANGLIAN MATERIALS SOCIETY - Charles Dickens and Victorian Disasters

Our 2011-12 lecture programme starts with a talk by Dr Peter Lewis from the Open University looking at Victorian engineering disasters in the context of Charles Dickens.

--------------------
Synopsis

Charles Dickens rose to fame as a novelist because he described society in early Victorian Britain both accurately and evocatively. That skill arose from his work as a journalist, and his many first-hand experiences of major incidents. He was able to use those reports as the factual basis of his novels.

His experiences of the railways were especially important, and he made great use of them in his novels such as Dombey and Son. He was involved in a railway disaster himself, at Staplehurst in 1865, a major trauma which led him to include the accident at the end of Our Mutual Friend, and also resulted in a ghost story, The Signalman. Many of those disasters were caused by materials used in unacceptable applications, but especially cast iron in tension. Lessons were not learnt quickly and bridge failures continued throughout the period, and reflect poorly on the infrastructure of the railway network.
------------------

Our meeting are open to anyone with an interest in the topic being covered.
Details can also be found on http://talks.cam.ac.uk/ or the IOM3 website.

For further information, please contact:

Serena Best - e-mail - smb51@cam.ac.uk; tel - 01223 334307

or Geoff Hale - e-mail - geoffrey.hale@ntlworld.com; tel - 01223 842403
-------------
CAMSoc on talks.cam.ac.uk

Wednesday 19th October

17.00, 25 minute talk plus 5 minutes for questions
T001
DMG Seminar: The role of carriers in ZnO based diluted magnetic oxides

Professor Hsiung Chou
Visitor to Device Materials Group

13/10/2011

15:00
T001
Field mapping of semiconductor devices with 1 nm-scale resolution by off axis electron holography

Dr David Cooper

10 October 2011

12 noon for one hour
T001
Substituted Metal Oxides for C-H Bond Activation

Talk by Lauren Misch of the University of California in Santa Barbara.

15/09/2011

11:00
T001
Bonding Charge Density in SrTiO3 under an Electric Field Measured by Quantitative Convergent Beam Electron Diffraction

Andrew W S Johnson
HREM seminar details

14/09/2011

15:00
T001
Nanoparticle Shape: Effects and Modeling

Emilie Ringe
HREM seminar details

14 July 2011

11 am
T001
"Designed Porous Carbon Materials for Catalysis and Adsorption"

Presentation by: Professor An-Hui Lu
From: State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, China

8 July

11 for 11:15am
Gordon Lab
BEYOND THE LIMITS - ALTERNATIVE TESTING CONCEPTS IN NANO MECHANICS

Dr. Holger Pfaff of Agilent Technologies. The talk will be interesting to those involved in nanoindentation and small scale mechanical testing. The seminar will take place at 11:15 on Friday morning in the Gordon Laboratory seminar room. Refreshments will be served from 11:00am.

14 June 2011

afternoon
Babbage LT
Armourers and Brasiers' Forum 2011

Professor Albert Fert will give the Kelly lecture in 2011
ABC Forum website

10th June

12 pm
T001
From Nanoscience through Engineering to Innovation at Tyndall National Institute

Speaker: Roger Whatmore, CEO of the Tyndall National Institute (Ireland)

Tyndall National Institute (Tyndall) is Ireland's leading research centre in the field of ICT hardware, with over 400 staff, students and support personnel. It has a clear role to provide Irish academic and industrial researchers with an internationally-leading range of facilities and capabilities and to assist the movement of knowledge from fundamental research into industrial development.

10 June

11.15 am
Gordon Laboratory Seminar Room, Austen Building
Structural Materials Seminar Series: Micro-compression testing of small-scale bcc single crystals

Prof. Oliver Kraft, University of Karlsruhe, Germany
Structural Materials Seminar Series website

3 June

11.15 am
Gordon Laboratory Seminar Room, Austen Building
Structural Materials Seminar Series: "Thermodynamic modelling of plasticity in metals: multiscale analysis and Kocks?Mecking theory"

Dr. Pedro Rivera, University of Cambridge
Structural Materials Seminar Series website

27 May

11.15 am
Gordon Laboratory Seminar Room, Austen Building
Structural Materials Seminar Series: Diffusion of Mass in Liquid Metals and Alloys

Prof. Andreas Meyer, German Aerospace Centre, Cologne, Germany
Structural Materials Seminar Series website

13 May

11.15 am
Gordon Laboratory Seminar Room, Austen Building
Structural Materials Seminar Series: Mechanisms governing strength and hardening in small volumes

Dr. Daniel Kiener, Department Materials Physics, University of Leoben & Erich Schmid Institute of Materials Science, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Austria
Structural Materials Seminar Series website

12 April 2011

7 for 7:30pm
T001, Dept of Materials Science
Cambridge and Anglian Materials Society : "Fukushima What went wrong?"

Speaker - Tony Roulstone, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge
(formerly Head of Rolls-Royce Nuclear Engineering)

Abstract

On 11th March an unprecedented earthquake and subsequent tsunami crippled a
six reactor site in NE Japan at Fukushima. Tony Roulstone from the
University of Cambridge Department of Engineering will attempt to explain
what happened during the period of two weeks when the world watched as the
operators grappled with a different problem each day which damaged at least
four of reactors and has impacted the renaissance in nuclear energy around
the world. Though details from the accident are sketchy, Tony Roulstone will
attempt to demystify the accident.

Further information from Geoff Hale (e-mail - geoffrey.hale@ntlworld.com; tel - 01223 842403)

17 March 2011

7 for 7:30pm
T001
CAMSoc Lecture - "Residual Stresses: Their Role in Structural Integrity Assessment and Advanced Techniques for their Analysis"

Our third meeting of 2011 features a talk by Mike Fitzpatrick who is Head of Department of Design, Development, Environment and Materials, at the open University and his talk will be entitled "Residual Stresses: Their Role in Structural Integrity Assessment and Advanced Techniques for their Analysis"

Time: 7.30 pm
Venue: T001, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge.

Refreshments available in the Tea Room from 7.00pm.

NON-MEMBERS ALWAYS VERY WELCOME - We look forward to seeing there.

15 June 2010

Afternoon
Babbage LT
Armourers and Brasiers' Forum 2010

Professor Ke Lu will give the Kelly Lecture in 2010.
ABC Forum website

Thurs 25th Mar

11:50 to 12:30
RR UTC conference room
Non-Destructive Materials Characterisation

Dr David Wright, Rolls-Royce

For engineering applications non-destructive testing (NDT) has long been viewed as no more than simple "crack-testing". The advent of non-destructive evaluation (NDE) developed this concept producing much more numerate data. Non-destructive materials characterisation promises much, much more than the "crack testing" story, enabling, as the title suggest, characterisation of materials in terms of actual physical and mechanical properties or forensic history data. Cases where this NDMC approach has been applied are presented suggesting interesting and novel engineering solutions.

Thurs 25th Mar

11:00 to 11:40
RR UTC conference room
Titanium alloys - structure, texture and the unknowns - the next decade…

Prof Dave Rugg, Rolls-Royce

Titanium alloys are fascinating metallurgical systems that may exhibit a wide range of microstructures, textures and resulting achievable properties. This talk will aim to give an introduction to the phase transformations, texture evolution and deformation mechanisms that dictate properties and therefore determine durability. Case studies detailing the engineering impact of these issues will be used to highlight the importance of mechanistic understanding with reference to safety critical parts.

Weds 17 March

3pm
T001
'Probing the Structure and Property of Nanomaterials with Advanced Microscopy'

Speaker: Nan Yao Affiliation: Princeton University, Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM) Princeton, NJ 08540, USA

Abstract:We study property of nanomaterials through coupling of electron, ion, x-ray, force microscopy and in situ electrical and mechanical manipulation, in tandem with theoretical simulations. Two examples are presented. For functional nanowires, we have achieved resonance at frequencies two orders of magnitude lower than the natural resonance frequency. We show that electric charge imbalance arising from focused ion beam exposure is responsible for the creation of this unprecedented ultralow superharmonic resonance behavior in function nanowires. For bioinspirednanomaterials, we present a series of observations pertaining to the red abalone (Haliotis rufescens) shell's organic-inorganic interface, organic interlayer morphology and properties, large-area crystal domain orientations, and nacre growth. In particular, we demonstrate that the organic material sandwiched between aragonite platelets consists of multiple organic layers of varying nano-mechanical resilience. We propose a spiral growth model that accounts for both vertical propagation via helices that surround numerous screw dislocation cores and simultaneous lateral growth of aragonite sheet structure. At last, we describe the advantage of newly developed scanning helium-ion microscopy over the scanning electron microscopy and focused ion (Ga+) beam system. We discuss the superior resolution of helium-ion induced secondary electron imaging and abnormal oscillation of backscattered helium-ion beam intensity with the target atomic number.

17/03/10

7 for 7:30pm
T001
CAMSoc lecture: "Nuclear Power in the UK?"

presented by Prof. Robin Grimes of Imperial College, London. As usual the lecture will take place in T001 and will commence at 7.30pm. Refreshments will be available in the Tea Room from 7.00pm. All are welcome to attend.

12th Mar

9:45 am to 4 pm
Cripps. Court, Magdalene College
The pervasive influence of phase transitions in natural and device materials - ONE DAY MEETING

There will be a one day meeting of informal talks from researchers in Cambridge with interests in diverse aspect of phase transitions and their applications.

Cripps. Court, Magdalene College, Friday 12th March, 9.45 am - 4.00 pm.

Coffee, lunch and tea will be provided. If you would like to attend please send an email message to Michael Carpenter so that we can anticipate numbers for catering (mc43@esc.cam.ac.uk).

Background
Although thoroughly mature in scientific terms, the scientific field of phase transitions remains as vigorous as ever in physics, chemistry, engineering, materials science and earth sciences. It is not simply that experimental and computational techniques have advanced, allowing progressively more detailed and quantitative analysis of known transitions in known materials. Rather, the complexity of the materials which can be produced and the diversity of mixed instabilities which can occur within them has led to the discovery of new acoustic, optic, electrical, magnetic, electronic, thermodynamic .. effects. Research in this area has prospered in Cambridge and is spread between at least five departments. The main objective of the meeting is to compare notes on research directions (materials, properties, simulations...) and equipment (magnetism, diffraction, elasticity, calorimetry...) currently in use, with the broader context of linking structure/property relations and applications.

Wednesday 10th March 2010

16.00, 25 minute talk, 5 minutes questions
T001
DMG Group Seminar

Title: BiFeO3-BiMnO3 nanocomposites

Satyabrata Patnaik

Wed 3 March

7pm
T001
IOM3 Young Person's Lecture Competition - local heat

The local heat of the IOM3 Young Person's Lecture Competition, will take place on Wednesday 3 March, in T001, commencing at 7:00 pm. Light refreshments will be available in the Tea Room from 6:30 pm. This year we have four competitors covering a range of different topics. Once the presentations are complete, then we will retire to the Tea Room again for more refreshments while the judges make their decision.
This is always a fascinating evening, with a mix of talks on a variety of materials-related topics. It will be really encouraging for the competitors if we have a large audience for the
event.

Wednesday 24th February 2010

16.00, 25 minute talk, 5 minute questions
T001
DMG Group Seminar

Title: Josephson Junctions with Inhomogeneous Magnetic Interlayers.

James D S Witt

18th Feb

5pm
T001
Blue Danube: the first British Atomic Bomb. An insider's story of its development and testing

In this talk Colin Hughes shares his experience as a nuclear weapon designer at
Fort Halstead in Kent and Aldermaston, Berkshire from 1949 to 1956,
concentrating on the first British atomic weapon, codenamed Blue Danube. Colin
joined William Penney’s team at Fort Halstead in early 1949, at the age of
twenty. Two years later, as a chartered engineer, he became part of the design
team working on the core of Blue Danube, and although he did not attend the
first trial of the weapon at Monte Bello, off the coast of Western Australia in
1952, he was closely associated with the arrangements for transporting the
plutonium to the Islands and for handling it on site. One year later, at
Operation Totem in the South Australian desert, he was part of a three-man
assembly team loading plutonium into two weapons shortly before firing. During
this period he was also studying physics part time at Birkbeck College under
Professor J D Bernal and, in some of the quiet moments in the Australian desert,
Sir William Penney (as he had then become), advised him on the finer points of
taking examinations in thermodynamics.

Colin will also describe a return to the bomb site 50 years later to see how it
had changed, and will also touch briefly on his move away from nuclear weapons
to civil nuclear power applications.

11 Feb

5 pm
T001
Functional mixed anion nitrides: from photocatalysts to CMR materials

Professor Amparo Fuertes, Institute of Materials Science of Barcelona

11th Feb

3-4 pm
T001
'Using Raman Spectroscopy to investigate naturally-occurring Carbon'

The Materials Chemistry Group seminar this week will be given by Robert Sparkes.

Abstract: Raman Spectroscopic analysis of samples of natural carbon from Spain, Taiwan and Italy has shown that insights into the thermal history of the geological samples can be gained quickly and easily. Analysis of the degree of ordering within million-year-old natural carbon shows the temperature history of the samples and provides evidence for large-scale mountain-building events occurring at that time.

Wednesday 10th February 2010

16.00, 25 minute talk, 5 minute questions
T001
DMG Group Seminar

Title: Influence of doping at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 Interface.

Thomas Fix

27 January 2010

2:15 pm (50 mins)
T001
FIHM Group Seminar

"Classical host:guest chemistry and modern porosity of the crystalline solid-state"
Speaker: Dr Gareth Lloyd, Chemistry Dept., Cambridge.

22/1/10

4pm for 4:15pm
Tower Seminar Room (T001)
The 3-D Atom Probe: Materials Analysis on the Sub-nanometre Scale

There will be a special seminar this Friday on Atom Probe Tomography, given by Prof. George D.W. Smith FRS, from the University of Oxford. Prof. Smith heads the EPSRC national atom probe facility, located in the Materials department of the University of Oxford. He will be introducing the 3D atom probe instrument, which allows users to collect individual atoms and reconstruct 3D atomic maps, thereby revealing buried nanoscale features. This technique can now be used on a wide variety of materials, from metals and alloys to semiconductors and ceramics.

Abstract: "The three-dimensional atom probe (3DAP) is a combination of a field ion microscope, a time-of-flight mass spectrometer, and a position-sensitive ion detector system. With this instrument, the positions and identities of individual atoms on a solid surface can be established. By removing successive atomic layers of material, the entire three-dimensional structure and chemistry of a region approximately 100nm x 100nm x 1000nm can be reconstructed with sub-nanometre precision. The principles of the theory and operation of the 3DAP will be outlined, and a range of applications will be described, including studies of nanoscale precipitation in metals and alloys, the characterisation of semiconductor nanostructures, and the investigation of chemical processes on the surfaces of catalyst materials".

4pm (tea and biscuits), 4:15pm talk

Wed 20 January

7:30pm
T001
CAMSoc lecture - Materials for Stretchable Electronics

The lecturer will be Stephanie Lacour from the Nanoscience Centre here in Cambridge and she will be speaking on "Materials for Stretchable Electronics"

As always all are welcome to attend and light refreshments will be available in the Tea Room before the lecture from 7.00pm.

Wednesday 20th January 2010

16.00, 25 minute talk, 5 minute questions
T001
DMG Group Seminar

Title: Hybrid Organic/Metal Oxide Solar Cells

Talia Gershon

Mon 11th Jan

5pm
T001
Seminar by Selva Venkat UH/Superpower

Speaker: Professor Selva Venkat from the University of Houston and formally of the Superpower divison of Philips.

Superpower are one of the two leading makers of practical and generation superconduction tape and are currently, arguably, at present demonstrating the highest current carrying materials. Dr Venkat will be talking about the development and applications of practical superconducting engineering materials.

The materials science challenges in creating superconductors span several areas of the discipline from traditional metallurgy of the carrier tape, through large scale orientated deposition of ceramic buffer layers to the device materials of the superconducting layer itself. The talk will, therefore, be interesting to all members of the department.

11 Dec

10.15
Austin LT
Ferroelectric Thin Films of BiFeO3-based Multilayers

A seminar by prof. John Wang, from NUS Singapore.

Please do come along if you're interested; and prof. Wang will be here for the rest of the day if you'd like to talk with him. His research is based around functional oxides, materials preparation, and novel applications.

10th Dec

12:30pm
Tea room
Department BBQ and Ceilidh

Tickets are just £2.50 each, but are limited, so get yours now to avoid disappointment - available from Reception or Tearoom.

Vegetarians.... Please advise at the time of purchasing your ticket in order that we can cater for your dietary requirements.

10 December 2009

4:00-5:00 PM
T501
PT group meeting

Dr. Yang Jianguo is a visiting scientist in PT group, from Harbin Institute of Technology, China. He will talk about research scopes of the welded mechanic and reliability in state key laboratory of advanced welding production and technology, China.

1st Dec

3pm
T001
Title to be announced - EM Group seminar

Dr James Loudon (Dept of Materials Science, University of Cambridge)

24th Nov

3pm
T001
Title to be announced - EM Group seminar

Dr Richard Langford (Dept of Physics, University of Cambridge)

23rd November 2009

2:30-3:30
T501
PT group meeting: Thermal stability of remaining austenite

Speaker: Arijit Sahapodder

20th Nov

11am
Pfizer Seminar Room
Corrosion Group Colloquia - see below

Colloquium 1: MULTIPLE NANO ELEMENTS OF SCC - TRANSITION FROM PHENOMENOLOGY
TO PREDICTIVE MECHANISTICS

by Roger W. STAEHLE
(Staehle Consulting, USA)

and

Colloquium 2: THE NUCLEAR POWER INSTITUTE OF CHINA (NPIC) AND SURVEY OF
NUCLEAR POWER IN CHINA

by Xiong Ru
Nuclear Power Institute of China

17th Nov

3pm
T001
"Designer Zeolites" - EM Group seminar

Prof. Mike Treacy (Leverhulme Visiting Professor, University of Oxford & Arizona State University, USA)

13th November 2009

All day
St. John's College
Cambridge CNT symposium 2009

The forum will provide a platform for reviewing and discussing novel developments in the field of carbon nanostructures and related materials as well as their applications.

Registration closes 23rd October 2009. See website for fees and a registration form.
Cambridge CNT website

10th Nov

3pm
T001
"Electron Tomography for novel nanostructures" - EM Group seminar

Dr Juan-Carlos Hernandez (Dept of Materials Science, University of Cambridge)

Abstract: The desire to fabricate nanostructures with controlled properties has generated considerable interest in many fields such as molecular nanotechnology, electronic devices and/or heterogeneous catalysis. In particular, morphological control of nanoparticles has become increasingly important as many of their physical and chemical properties are highly shape-dependent and require an accurate characterization technique. As nanomaterials are often three-dimensional (3D) in nature, the limited-size, complexity and heterogeneity of the produced nanostructures require an accurate three-dimensional characterization technique. As such, electron tomography has been used successfully in materials science and its application has developed rapidly over recent years enabling 3D analysis allowing a better understanding of physical-chemical properties of nanostructures. A variety of electron tomography results of a wide range of different novel nanostructures, arising from several fields of nanotechnologies, will be shown together with some recent development to enhance the tomographic characterization.

3rd Nov

3pm
T001
"Focussed Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscopy 3D applications: a progress report" - EM Group seminar

Dr Martin Ritter (Dept of Materials Science, University Cambridge)

27th October

3pm
T001
"Future electron imaging detectors for radiation sensitive samples" - EM Group seminar

Dr Greg McMullan (MRC Lab for Molecular Biology, University of Cambridge)

Wednesday 21st October

7 for 7:30pm
T001
CamSoc Meeting - "Modelling Degradation of Bioresorbable Medical Devices - Theory and Examples"

The presentation will be given by Dr. Jingzhe Pan of the Department of Engineering, University of Leicester.

As usual, the lecture will take place in T001 at 7.30pm and refreshments will be available in the Tea Room from 7.00pm.

All are welcome to attend. We look forward to seeing you on that evening.

20th October 2009

3pm
T001
Precession Electron Diffraction in the Transmission Electron Microscope

Dr Alex Eggeman

EM group seminar

13th October 2009

3pm
Pfizer Seminar room
Determining the optical properties of atmospheric carbon species using low-loss EELS

Dr Duncan Alexander

EM group seminar

bstract:The principle for determining the optical properties of materials from the low-loss electron energy-loss spectrum in the TEM has been known for many years. This technique promises the ability to identify the optical properties of particles and structures with a spatial resolution on the nano-scale. Moreover, the advent of monochromated electron sources and improved spectrometers have created the instrumental capabilities required for studying the energy-loss spectrum in the 1.8-3.1 eV energy-loss range corresponding to visible light. However, factors such as Cherenkov radiation and surface plasmon resonances create significant challenges for the application of this technique. Here, these challenges will be discussed with respect to the aim of determining the optical properties of sub-micrometre atmospheric light-absorbing carbon species, as will the reasons for the successful identification and optical property determination of atmospheric brown carbon spheres. Recognition of this aerosol species will be consistent with the aim of improving the assumptions and accuracy of aerosol data for climate models.

Wednesday 16th September 2009

3pm
T001
Radiation damage in metals and polymers

Who: Professor Emeritus Ray Egerton
Affiliation: Univeristy of Alberta, Canada

Abstract: With the widespread use of field-emission sources and aberration-corrected lenses, radiation damage in the TEM becomes a problem even for conducting specimens. We have performed experiments and calculations of electron-induced sputtering in order to better estimate the rate and incident-energy threshold of this form of damage. Previous EELS measurements of radiation damage in polymers suggested a remarkable reduction in damage in the case of small-diameter electron probes. I will show results that confirm these claims and discuss some possible interpretations.

Friday 28/08/09

3-4 pm
T001
Manufacturing a Phase Plate to Image Magnetic Fields using an Electron (HREM Group talk)

Speaker: Sam Jones, under graduate summer student in HREM.

Using a phase plate is one method of capturing magnetic information
from a sample in an electron microscope. I have just completed an
eight week project with the aim of making a phase plate, installing it
in an electron microscope, taking images of some magnetic test samples
and comparing the results with a simulation. In this talk I will
explain what we did and present the results.

Thursday 6th August

11am to 5pm
Gonville & Caius sportsground
2nd CAMBRIGE v IMPERIAL CRICKET MATCH

Tickets for BBQ available from Reception.
1st Cambridge v Imperial cricket match 2008

31 July

Half day (from 9am)
Cambridge Union Society, 9a Bridge Street
Workshop on Novel Materials for Sustainable Energies of the Future 29-31 July

Chinese Academy of Sciences and the University of Cambridge workshop

Everyone is welcome and there is no need to register.

Further information: Tao-Tao Chang, ext. 39712.
Programme

30 July

All day (from 9am)
Cambridge Union Society, 9a Bridge Street
Workshop on Novel Materials for Sustainable Energies of the Future 29-31 July

Chinese Academy of Sciences and the University of Cambridge workshop

Everyone is welcome and there is no need to register.

Further information: Tao-Tao Chang, ext. 39712.
Programme

29 July

All day (from 8:50am)
Cambridge Union Society, 9a Bridge Street
Workshop on Novel Materials for Sustainable Energies of the Future 29-31 July

Chinese Academy of Sciences and the University of Cambridge workshop

Everyone is welcome and there is no need to register.

Further information: Tao-Tao Chang, ext. 39712.
Programme

19 - 24 July

Dept Mat Sci
Goldsmiths: Materials Science residential course for teachers

Residential course for secondary/sixth form teachers giving insight into current materials science topics.
Goldsmiths website

12 - 16 July

Dept of Mat Sci
Headstart - physical science course

Residential course for sixth form students giving an insight into Cambridge University and Materials Science
Headstart website

24/06/09

4.00 pm
T001
DMG Seminar Easter Term

Xavier Moya
Magnetoelectric and magnetocaloric effects

Thursday 11 June

4pm to 6pm
Tearoom Patio
PATIO PARTY

Come and enjoy a BBQ and drinks (wine, pimms) on the Department patio drenched in sunshine
Tickets must be purchased in advance; £3 each

10/06/09

4.00 pm
T001
DMG Seminar Easter Term

Suman-Lata Sahonta
Structural and Chemical Characterisation of Functional Materials by Transmission Electron Microscopy

10 June 2009

11am
T001
Intense NIR Emission from Lanthanide Molecules and Clusters

Speaker: Prof John Brennon

Abstract: Optical fibers rely on emission from lanthanide (Ln) ions for signal amplification. Introducing an emissive Ln ion into a solid-state glass is relatively easy, but incorporating emissive Ln into the rapidly developing class of polymer based fibers represents a challenge. We’ve found that lanthanide compounds with sulfur or selenium based anions (i.e. EPh^- , E2- _, EE2- ; E = S, Se) are the most efficient molecular NIR sources in the literature, with quantum efficiencies that approach those of solid-state materials. Our initial studies on Ln(SR)_3 molecules led to an examination of nanoscale LnE clusters, and results here inspired the synthesis, structural characterization, and photophysical examination of nanoscale oxide and fluoride clusters, using chemistry that can only be approached with Ln(EPh)_3 starting materials. The molecular nature of these nanoscale materials affords an entry to the preparation of emissive Ln /polymer composites.

Prof John Brennon is currently a visiting Professor in the Functional Inorganic and Hybrid Materials Group.

Tuesday 9th of June 2009

1.30pm to 6.30pm
Babbage Lecture theatre
Armourers and Brasiers' Cambridge Forum

Featuring the Kelly lecture and the Gordon seminars
ABC Forum web site

Fri 29 May

11:15am
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin building
Gordon Lab Seminars - "THE EFFECT OF PLASTIC ANISOTROPY ON HYSTERESIS IN CERAMICS"

Dr Finn Giuliani (Dept. of Materials, Imperial College London)

A large hysteresis has been observed in the loading/unloading curves of many materials, such as the MAX-phase Ti_3 SiC_2 , and is generally attributed to deformation by the formation of kink bands due to anisotropy of the crystal structure. The aim of this research is to investigate the importance of kinking in causing this effect, by comparing the hysteresis behaviour observed in materials with different crystal structures, notably MgO and Al_2 O_3 , as well as Ti_3 SiC_2 . To investigate whether kinking might contribute in the MAX-phase Ti_3 SiC_2 , the hysteresis behaviour of a thin film of Ti_3 SiC_2 grown on sapphire was compared with a similar film in which the volume fraction of Ti_3 SiC_2 was reduced by incorporating layers of isotropic TiC. It was found that decreasing the volume fraction of kinking material increased the hysteresis effect, suggesting that kinking is not the predominant cause of the hysteresis effect even in Ti_3 SiC_2 . Using indentation, hysteresis effects were observed in MgO although transmission electron microscopy of the deformed zone under the indent showed that flow occurred only by dislocation motion, showing that kinking is not required for this hysteresis. No hysteresis was observed in Al_2 O_3 . On the basis of these experiments, it is suggested that hysteresis arises in materials where the general strain to accommodate the indenter by dislocation motion requires the operation of two sets of independent slip systems, with one set having a much greater yield stress than the other.

20/05/09

4.00 pm
T001
DMG Seminar Easter Term

Kartik Senapati
Anomalous field dependence of critical current in sidewall shunted Josephson junctions

Fri 15th May

11.00
T001
A story of high TC dilute magnetic semiconductors

Speaker: Dr Alberta Bonanni from the Institute of Semiconductor and Solid State Physics at Johannes-Kepler University in Linz, Austria.

Dr Bonanni has drawn attention recently with her recent results on the origin of ferromagnetism in dilute magnetic semiconductors and is currently in demand as an invited speaker, so the seminar promises to be interesting! Details as follows:

A story of high TC dilute magnetic semiconductors

In the context of our work on various materials systems [1,2], we will survey the historical development and the present understanding of the origin of the high Curie temperature discovered over the last decade in magnetically doped semiconductors and in non-magnetic systems. We will highlight the many challenging experimental findings and theoretical interpretations surfacing in this highly controversial field and give an outlook of the prospect applications of high TC self-assembled metal/semiconductor hybrid structures.

[1] A. Bonanni, A. Navarro-Quezada, Tian Li, M. Wegscheider, R.T. Lechner, G. Bauer, Z. Matej, V. Holý, M. Rovezzi, F. D'Acapito, M. Kiecana, M. Sawicki, and T. Dietl, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 135502 (2008).

[2] W. Pacuski, P. Kossacki, D. Ferrand, A. Golnik, J. Cibert, M. Wegscheider, A. Navarro-Quezada, A. Bonanni, M. Kiecana, M. Sawicki, T. Dietl, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 037204 (2008).

Wed 13 May

18.45
LR 4, Dept of Engineering, Trumpington St.
"Cambridge & Anglian Materials Society": IGUS - The Story of Plastics for Longer Life

Speaker: Matthew Aldridge, Director, IGUS Ltd

Summary: The story of how a small family owned injection moulding
company became the world leader in plastic bearing technology.
Application case studies, material development history, emerging trends,
and a small insight into the sometimes unique world of IGUS.

For more information on IGUS - see http://www.igus.co.uk/

Venue: Lecture Room 4, Department of Engineering, University of
Cambridge, Trumpington Street, Cambridge, CB2 1PZ

[Note - this meeting is NOT at MSM as normal.]

This lecture is open to anyone interested.

While there is no specific registration for this event, if you are
planning to attend, could you please e-mail - geoff.hale@pem.cam.ac.uk
- so that I can let the I Mech E organiser have an idea of likely numbers.

This is our final meeting for the 2008-2009 season. Meetings will start
again in October and we will let you have details of the first event and
the complete programme during the second half of September.

For any queries, please contact

Geoff Hale
Pembroke College Cambridge
tel - 01223 338139
e-mail - geoff.hale@pem.cam.ac.uk

Wed 13th May

2.30pm
Pfizer Conference Room - Pfizer Tower, Arup Building
Understanding the In cubo crystallization of membrane proteins

Speaker: Dr Chandrashekhar Kulkarni,
Department of Chemistry, Imperial College London

ABSTRACT
Lipid based methods for the crystallization of membrane proteins including In-cubo crystallization are becoming popular in recent times. Lipidic bicontinuous cubic (Cubo) phases are complex three-dimensional lipid networks consisting of a single continuous bilayer intricately arranged within three dimensional spaces separating two distinct water channels. Cubic phases provide a 3-D lipid network, into which membrane proteins reconstitute, before protein crystals nucleate and then grow. However, a complete understanding of the basic principles behind the In cubo crystallization method is still elusive. Using time-resolved x-ray scattering (SAXS) and ultra-violet spectroscopy (UV) we have been able to gain new insights into some of the events occurring during the crystallization. Effect of protein conformational changes on the lipid phase behaviour and vice versa, will also be discussed.

Thurs 7 May

16.00
T001
Indentation-induced structural phase transitions in crystalline and amorphous silicon and germanium

Speaker: Dr. M. Munawar Chaudhri , Cavendish Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Cambridge

Dr. M. Munawar Chaudhri, is the head of the Materials Group in the Department of Physics, University of Cambridge. He is a specialist in the field of Solid State Physics and his research interests focus on nanomechanical properties of materials, studies of very fast phenomena using high-speed photography, pressure-induced phase transitions in semiconductors, and fast reactions in solids.

06/05/09

4.00 pm
T001
DMG Seminar Easter Term

Neil Mathur
Magnetoelectric multilayer capacitors

Wed 6th May

4pm
T001
PARAEQUILIBRIUM CARBURIZATION IN STAINLESS STEEL:

PROFESSOR ARTHUR HEUER
Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA

ABSTRACT
Carburization of austenitic stainless steels at low temperatures, i.e. under paraequilibrium conditions, leads to massive increase in surface hardness (Rockwell C values of 70.5 or higher) without carbide formation. This “superhardness” is due to a “colossal” supersaturation of carbon interstitials (10-20 at %) and results in ~100x improvement in wear resistance, with essentially no loss in ductility of carburized components. Furthermore, the carbon concentration profile resulting from this “Low Temperature Colossal SuperSaturation” (LTCSS) 1 atm. gas phase carburization leads to residual surface compressive stresses 2 GPa, which arise because the uncarburized core constrains the ~3% lattice expansion that would otherwise arise from the massive concentration of interstitial carbon. These residual compressive stresses dramatically improve the fatigue resistance. In particular, fatigue lifetimes are increased by up to ~100x, and the endurance limit is nearly doubled. Finally, and most surprisingly, the corrosion resistance of 316L stainless steel in seawater is significantly enhanced­in crevice corrosion tests, for example, it outperforms Ni-base alloys such as IN625.
Prof Heuer's webpage

29/04/09

4.00 pm
T001
DMG Seminar Easter Term

Mark Blamire
2012 move to West Cambridge

Friday 24th April

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
Gordon Lab Seminar: "Scanning Probe Microscopy and its Application to GaN"

Dr Rachel Oliver, Dept. of Materials Science & Metallurgy, University of Cambridge

Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can provide access to the nanoscale surface structure of any material, irrespective of its conductivity. It allows quantitative analysis of features with heights down to the atomic scale, and is also the basis of an ever-expanding rang of other scanning probe techniques which allow the quantification of other materials properties such as stiffness, conductivity and local potential. In this talk, I will recap the basic principles of AFM and their usual technological implementation, and draw out both the strengths and the limitations of the technique. I will then focus on a particular application of AFM – assessment of dislocation densities and spatial distributions in GaN – to illustrate the strength of this technique in the quantitative assessment of materials properties. Lastly, I will show how we have extended our AFM-based studies to assess the impact of the dislocations, and the techniques used to control their densities, on the electrical properties of the material.

Friday 24 April

11.30am
Rolls-Royce Conference Room
"Self-Assembled Quantum Dots, Atoms in the Solid State"

Speaker: Maurice Skolnick from the Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sheffield

In this talk he will review some of the latest physics which can be performed on single self assembled semiconductor quantum dots. Such single dots exhibit atom-like properties to a very good approximation. Phenomena to be focussed on will include ultrafast control of spin charge and exciton-photon dressed states. Examples where the atom-like approximation breaks down will also be given.

23 April 2009

12:45
Tearoom
BBQ

Arrive prompt for food. Tickets £2.50 each from Reception/Tearoom. Let Del know if you are vegetarian

Tuesday 21 April

16.00
T001
Crystal Nucleation: From Ostwald to Outer Space.

Speaker: Prof Daan Frenkel, Chair of Theoretical Chemistry, University of Cambridge

The crucial step in the nucleation of a novel phase from a meta-stable
parent phase is the formation of a critical nucleus. In experiments, it
is very difficult to capture the formation of such a nucleus. For this
reason, computer simulations play an important role in our efforts to
gain a better insight in the microscopic mechanism of crystal
nucleation. In my talk I will briefly discuss the phenomenology of
crystal nucleation and then discuss examples that illustrates that
nucleation is often much more complex than had been expected.

Wed 25 Mar

4pm (25 mins talk + 5 mins Qs)
T001
Device Materials Group Seminar: Niobium-Holmium Josephson devices

James Witt

Fri 20th March

11 for 11:15am
Gordon Lab seminar room
Gordon Lab seminar: "Materials in Extremes (or clocking failure and making best use of the time available)"

Dr Neil Bourne, AWE & Institute of Shock Physics, Dept. of Physics, Imperial College

Engineering must necessarily design materials and structures to both withstand the loads applied but then live to fight another day. However, the cosmos contains a range of more extreme conditions than those bound by the constraints found on earth. Condensed matter is pushed there to mechanical and electromagnetic states that are sufficient to activate mechanisms leading to reorganization of electronic energy levels and of the microstructure itself. Each of these has a threshold and operates at a rate determined by the material and the stimulus, and to understand response to an arbitrary impulse each must be isolated and characterized. A series of techniques has been developed to cover (parts at least of) the phase space necessary to understand these natural phenomena. These consist of pumps to excite the materials and then probes to determine their response. They have revealed chemical, structural, electrical and magnetic changes that explain the state of materials and structures recovered from such loading. Further they suggest future directions for the use of existing, and the development of new materials for fielding in extremes. This talk will review the physics acquired in this manner on the response of metals and brittle materials to dynamic loads. These behaviours will be used to describe the response of armours and extended to the effects upon rocks (and life) of cataclysmic impact on earth by extra-terrestrial bolides. The talk will hope to show that appreciating the kinetics of inelastic mechanisms at the microscale has a key role in understanding the integrated result at the continuum: or, more practically, how long you have got to avoid Armageddon.

Thurs 19th March

4pm
T001
Materials Chemistry seminar: Cutting CO2 emission from the materials industry by using sustainable manufacturing processes

Dr Julian Allwood is going to give us a brief introduction about his effort for cutting CO2 emission from the materials industry by using sustainable manufacturing processes. Dr Allwood is a Senior Lecturer in the Institute for Manufacturing and is a Fellow and Director of Studies in Engineering at Gonville and Caius College. He is a member of the Production Processes Group of the Institute for Manufacturing, and coordinator of the Institute's Sustainable Manufacturing Group.

Thurs 19th March

7 for 7:30pm
T001
Cambridge and Anglian Materials Society:

Speaker: Dr Alan Begg, Senior Vice President for Technology, SKF Group, Gothenburg,
Sweden

Materials Science is a fascinating subject at the very heart of all engineering
activities. The properties which materials offer frequently limit what is possible to
achieve in an artefact or construction. Developing new ideas in Materials
Science, and taking them successfully to market is, however, far from
straightforward. Alan Begg will talk about the challenges, opportunities and
rewards of bringing new materials technologies into commercial realities. These
will include:

o Particulate metal matrix composites
o Advanced coatings for the automotive industry
o New opportunities for piezoelectric ceramics
o DLC / ceramic surface treatments for large size bearings

Alan Begg will talk from personal experience about these developments and
draw some general conclusions of what leads to success with developments of
this type.

Light refreshments available from 7.00 pm in the tea room, lecture commences at 7.30 pm.

13th March

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
Materials in Extremes (or clocking failure and making best use of the time available)

Prof. Neil Bourne
(AWE & Institute of Shock Physics, Dept. of Physics, Imperial College)

Wed 11 Mar

4pm (25 mins talk + 5 mins Qs)
T001
Device Materials Group Seminar: Multifunctionality in vertical nanocomposites

Emily Weal

Thursday 5 March

12:00 noon
Seminar room T001
Elastocaloric effect in shape-memory alloys

Prof. Lluís Mañosa

5th March

4 pm
T001
Materials Chemistry Group seminar : Fabrication of high performance Gd-Ba-Cu-O

Professor David Cardwell, Professor of Superconducting Engineering, Department of Engineering, was one of the first to publish results showing that the superconductor MgB2, can be fabricated into wires without detrimentally effecting the properties. He has also recently developed a practical route to fabricate LRE-Ba-Cu-O single grain superconductors in air.

27 February

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
EBSD in the 3rd Dimension

Dr Ali Gholinia
(School of Materials, University of Manchester)

Wed 25 Feb

4pm (25 mins talk + 5 mins Qs)
T001
Device Materials Group Seminar: Nanomagentic materials grown by chemical routes

Yinglin Liu

Tuesday 24th February

7 for 7:30pm
T001
CAMSoc lecture: FROM ÅNGSTROMS TO NANOMETERS : A 40 YEAR JOURNEY IN MICROSTRUCTURE & PROPERTY CHARACTERISATON

Speaker: Professor Trevor Page

Abstract:
Controlling the development of microstructure and understanding the critical influence of that microstructure on materials’ properties are central platforms of materials science and engineering. Thus materials research has been an important driver in the development of new techniques for microstructural characterisation, often at ever-increasing spatial resolutions. There are an increasing number of industrial applications where assemblies of components have sub-micron dimensions – a scale where many mechanical properties of solids are also increasingly scale-sensitive. This lecture will show examples chosen from across my research
career (to date) and highlight some of the linkages between them.

As usual, refreshments will be available in the Tea Room from 7.00pm and all are welcome to attend.

19th Feb 2009

4pm
T001
Engineering Design Research

Professor Ken wallace (FREng) , the former director for the Engineering Design Centre (EDC).

In response to global pressures, industrial companies have improved the performance, reliability and price of their new products. These products tend to be complex and use sophisticated materials and production processes. The engineering design process is at the core of new product development and engineering design research sets out to answer the question: How are the best products designed?

Thursday 12 Feb 2009

12:45pm
Tearoom
BBQ

First BBQ of 2009! Advance ticket purchase required

Wed 11 Feb

4pm (25 mins talk + 5 mins Qs)
T001
Device Materials Group Seminar: Growth of epitaxial iron oxyarsenide (oxypnictide) thin films

Ahmed Kursumovic

Friday February 6th

2 pm
Austin LT
Recent Developments in Metal Borides - NEW TIME AND VENUE!!!!

Speaker: Prof Barbara Albert.

Borides of almost all metals are known to exist and to exhibit an enormous variety of compositions and structures. They also offer a wide range of opportunities in terms of interesting properties and possible functions. Boride materials are used as electrodes (LaB6, TiB2), magnets (Nd2Fe14B), superconductors (MgB2), for the hardening of tool (NiB) and other applications.

The talk will focus on known and new metal borides and their possible applications. It will present new findings on magnetic solids (Gd-Co-B), catalytically active nano-particles (Ni/Fe/Co-B),
boron-rich borides with high Seebeck coefficients: their synthesis, crystal structures, bonding situation, and physical properties.

For further information, please feel free to contact Prof. Tony Cheetham (akc30@cam.ac.uk).

Wed 28 Jan

4pm (25 mins talk + 5 mins Qs)
T001
Device Materials Group Seminar: Magnetic pinning in YBCO

Stuart Wimbush

Tues 20 Jan

7 for 7:30pm
T001
CAMSoc Lecture: Gallium Nitride: Lighting for the Future

Speaker: Dr Rachel Oliver

Refreshments in tearoom from 7pm and lecture starts at 7:30pm.

Friday 9 January 2009

11 am
T001
Status and Challenges for LEDs in Solid-State Lighting

Dr Mike Krames, Director of Advanced Laboratories at Philips Lumileds Lighting Company in the USA. Mike is extremely well informed, and he gives an excellent presentation. This is an excellent opportunity to have an overview of solid-state lighting from the Director of what is probably the leading industrial research laboratory in the world working on solid-state lighting.

Wednesday 17th December

4.00 pm
T001
Device Materials Group Seminar

Jason Robinson
Parity-dependent proximity effect in superconductor/antiferromagnet heterostructures

Friday 12 December

8pm to Midnight
The Howard Building, Downing College
Christmas Party 2008

Tickets £5 each - on sale now from Reception and Canteen

Thurs 11 Dec

7:30 pm
T001
Cambridge and Anglian Materials Society: Organic Semiconductors for Organic Light Emitting Displays (OLEDs): Synthesis, Electrochemistry, Processing and Production

Speaker: Professor Poopathy Kathirgamanathan from the Faculty of Engineering, Science and Built Environment, London South Bank University.


As usual, refreshments will be available in the Tea room from 7.00pm and all are welcome to attend.

Tuesday 9th December 2008

all day
Cripps Court, Magdalene College, Cambridge
HORIZON: Materials

This Horizon seminar will showcase exciting new research in materials, focusing in particular on the new technological advances in structural materials. The event will be of interest to organisations from a number of industrial sectors, in particular to aerospace, transport, energy, construction, security and defence.
More information…

Fri 5th Dec 2008

Churchill College
Cambridge CNT Symposium

The Cambridge CNT Symposium is the 2nd annual symposium on the science and applications of carbon nanotubes and related structures. Professor Mark Welland, FRS, FREng, the Director of the Nanoscience Centre at the Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge and also the chief scientific adviser at the ministry of Defence, will deliver the Keynote address.
http://www.cambridgecnt.org.

Wednesday 3rd December

4.00 pm
T001
Device Materials Group Seminar

Luke Dunlop
Low temperature Chemical routes to doped zinc oxidee Dunlop

Tues 2 December

12:30 - 2pm
Canteen
Fun Quiz - CASH PRIZES

Register your team for our general knowledge quiz. Teams of up to 6 people. £10 per team. CASH PRIZES. Register in advance at reception now

2nd Dec

11.15am
Gordon Lab Seminar Room
!!! NEW DATE !!! Gordon Lab Student Seminars

Subjects include:
-Development of Fibrestone Composite Material for Use in Extreme Environments

-Flow in Complex Crystal Structures

-The Effect of Nano-Scale Surface Terracing and Porosity on the Adhesion of Bone Cells to Prostheses

-Borides Carbides and Nitrides for High Temperatures

-The Effect of Periodic Quenching on the Sintering of Thermal Barrier Coatings
http://www.msm.cam.ac.uk/gordon/seminars/

Monday, 24th November

11am
T001
Ensuring exciting physics via selective chemistry

Vitalij K. Pecharsky, Anson Marston Distinguished Professor of Engineering, Ames Laboratory and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University
Intermetallic compounds of the rare earth metals (R) with group 14 elements (T) at the R5T4 stoichiometry provide numerous opportunities to clarify structure-property relationships, and in the future to exploit this knowledge. The uniqueness of these compounds lies in well-defined, selfassembled layers composed of R and T atoms coupled with the flexibility to modify their arrangements in closely related structures using a variety of triggers. In this presentation we will be concerned with some recently discovered, extraordinarily interesting magnetic and electronic
transport phenomena that are related to targeted structural and microstructural modifications that facilitate an unprecedented level of control over the physical behaviors of these compounds

Wednesday 19th November

4.00 pm
T001
Device Materials Group Seminar

Sophie Harrington
Tantalizing pinning in YBCO thin films

Thurs 13th Nov

7 for 7:30pm
T001
CAMSoc lecture: "The Role of Textile Technology in Future Composites Applications: from Aircraft to Tanks"

Presented by Professor Paul Hogg, of the University of Manchester. All are welcome to attend the lecture and refreshments will be served in the Tea Room beforehand from 7.00pm

Wednesday 12th November

4.00 pm
T001
Device Materials Group Seminar

Sarnjeet Dhesi (Diamond Light Source, Didcot, Oxon)
Polarised X-Ray Spectroscopy andMicroscopy for Nanomagnetism

7th November

11.15 am
Engineered Materials for Tissue Engineering and as a Tool to help understand Mechanotransduction

Dr Matthew Dalby
(Centre for Cell Engineering, University of Glasgow)

Wednesday 5th November

4.00 pm
T001
Device Materials Group Seminar

Thomas Fix
1. Co:(La,Sr)TiO3, a diluted magnetic oxide system
2. Two-dimensional electron gas at LAO/STO interface

31st October

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
Examining Small Scale Plasticity and Fracture of Seminconductors and Metals through in situ SEM Nanomechanical Testing

Dr Johann Michler
(Laboratory for Mechanics of Materials and Nanostructures, EMPA, Switzerland)

Wed 29 Oct

12:45
Tearoom
BBQ

£2.50 a ticket. Food will not be available after 1:15pm so arrive on time.

24th October

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
New Chemistry of Oxides and Nanoporous Materials

Prof. Matt Rosseinsky
(Department of Chemistry, University of Liverpool)

Thurs 23 Oct 2008

10-12
Dept Chemistry - Unilever LT
SciFinder Scholar training course

The Department of Chemistry has funded a University-wide subscription to SciFinder Scholar including the sub-structure search module (SSM). SciFinder provides access to the world's largest collection of biochemical, chemical, chemical engineering, medical and other related information in journal and patent literature.

See further info on the planned course at the Chemistry Library by going to:

http://www-library.ch.cam.ac.uk/ChemistryLibraryCourses/

and scrolling down to find the Sci-Finder course
More details…..

Thursday 23rd Oct

7:30pm
T001
"Magnetic Cooling: Refrigeration in a Spin" - CAMBRIDGE AND ANGLIAN MATERIALS SOCIETY

As usual, the meeting will be held at the Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, New Museums Site, Pembroke Street, University of Cambridge.

Light refreshments available from 7.00 pm, lecture commences at 7.30 pm.

Anyone who wishes to attend this presentation, and gain a greater appreciation of this fascinating area, is very welcome. In particular, we are always pleased to see non-members at our talks.

Wednesday 22nd October

4.00 pm
T001
Device Materials Group Seminar

Zsolt Gercsi
Spin polarization of Co2Fe-based ternary and quarternary Heusleralloys: theoretical interpretation to experimental results

21/10/2008

30min
T001
Effect of substrate orientation on magnetic anisotropy and 1/f noise in La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 thin films: the case of vicinal substrates

Dr Laurence Mechin

17th October

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
Real-time and in situ characterisation of the solidification of Al-based alloys by synchrotron X-ray imaging

Dr Nathalie Mangelinck-Noël
(Institut Materiaux Microélectronique Nanosciences de Provence)

10th October

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
Temperature Measurement Research at NPL

Prof. Graham Machin
(National Physical Laboratory, UK)

22nd August 2008

11:15
RR UTC Seminar Room
Solidification characteristics and segregation behavior of Nickel-Base-Superalloys in dependence of different Rhenium and Ruthenium contents

Speaker: Astrid Heckl

22nd August 2008

13:30
RR UTC Seminar Room
Diffusion Brazing of Single Crystalline Nickelbase Superalloys

Speaker: Markus Dinkel

18/08/08

4pm (approx 30min)
T001
Epitaxial functional materials on silicon

Speaker: B. Vilquin

Université de Lyon, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon (INL)

Contact: bertrand.vilquin@ec-lyon.fr

20th to 25th July

Residential
Department of Materials Science
The Goldsmiths' Science for Society Course

Science for Society Courses provide science teachers with free residential courses, aimed at broadening their perspective on subjects allied to the A-level syllabus. Each course examines areas of direct or related interest to science modules within the National Curriculum. Based in the Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy in the University of Cambridge, this course is aimed primarily at teachers of chemistry or physics. It provides an insight into the broad field of modern materials, spanning the physical sciences, engineering and biomedical applications. It includes practical demonstrations and industrial visits. There is coverage of topics as diverse as gold bars, integrated circuits and drug delivery.
Visit the course website

Friday 18 July 2008

10:30 cricket start, 1pm BBQ
Gonville & Caius sportsground
CAMBRIDGE V IMPERIAL MATERIALS CRICKET MATCH

13th to 17th July

Residential
Department of Materials Science / King's College
Headstart Focus Course: The Physical Sciences

The aim of this SCIENCE@cam course at the University of Cambridge is to introduce potential UG applicants to the way in which physical and biological sciences (including History and Philosophy of Science) are taught during the first two years of a student’s life within the university. Faculty tutors (staff and current and recent students) introduce the course participants to a range of activities largely based on chemistry, materials science and physics.
Visit the course website.

2nd July 2008

All day, starting at 9.00 and finishing at 17.00 (with breaks for coffee and lunch)
T001
MPhil Dissertation Presentation Day

Posters will be appearing in the Department with a detailed list of topics and times. All of the MPhil students will be presenting. Please come along and give them your support. Thank you

Wednesday 25th June

4.00 pm
T001
Device Materials Group Seminar

Nanocomposite: an original way to design strain in thin films
Speaker: Arnaud Fouchet

Friday 13th June

5-8pm
Darwin College Island
Garden Party

Come and enjoy a cocktail and BBQ on the banks of the river Cam.

Wednesday 11th June

4.00 pm
T001
Device Material Group Seminars

Nanowire solar cells
Speaker: Kevin Musselman

Tuesday, 10th of June 2008

1.00pm to 6.45pm
Babbage Lecture Theatre
Armourers and Brasiers Cambridge Forum

See Forum web site closer to the date.
Forum website

30th May

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
Variable Amplitude Fatigue Crack Growth; Mechanics and Mechanisms

Prof. Narayanaswami Ranganathan
(Univ Tours, Lab Mecan & Rheol EIT, Tours, France)

Wednesday 28th May

4.00 pm
T001
Device Material Group Seminar

Ordered nanostructures for devices
Speaker: Adam Robinson

22nd February

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
Nanoscale Multilayered Materials: the Role of Interfaces in governing Elastic, Plastic and Acoustic Properties

Dr. Grégory Abadias
(Department of Physical Metallurgy, Université de Poitiers, France)

Wednesday 21st May

4.00 pm
T001
Device Material Group Seminoar

0 to Pi transitions in superconductor/synthetic-antiferromagnetic/superconductor junctions
Speaker: Jason Robinson

16th May

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
On Columnar Joints - how Colloids and Kitchen Science can explain Cracks in Cooling Lava

Dr Lucas Goehring
(Dept. of Materials Science & Metallurgy, University of Cambridge)

Tuesday 13th May

7 for 7.30pm
T001
CAMSoc lecture: "Cornflour, Ketchup and Parts for Cars: Semi-Solid Processing of Metallic Alloys"

Presented by Professor Helen Atkinson, of the Department of Engineering, University of Leicester.

All are welcome to attend the lecture and refreshments will be served in the Tea Room beforehand from 7.00pm.

I look forward to seeing you there.

With regards,

Serena.

9th May

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
Morphology Control in Synthesis of Carbon Nanotube Fibres

Dr Anna Moisala
(Dept. of Materials Science & Metallurgy, University of Cambridge)

Wednesday 7th May

4.00 pm
T001
Device Materials Group Seminars

1. Epitaxial growth and properties of SrTiO3 (111) and Fe3O4 (111) bilayers on (001) substrates.
2. Kondo effect in Sr and Fe doped Mott insulators LaTiO3.
Speaker: Patrick Leung

2nd May

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
High-Rate and Shock Response of Polymer-Bonded Composite Systems

Dr Bill Proud
(Dept. of Physics, University of Cambridge)

30th April 2008

4.00 pm
T001
Device Materials Group Seminars

Speaker - Sohini Kar
Spatially resolved studies of phase separation and microstructure effects in hole doped manganites

Tuesday 29th April

5.30pm
BMS LT, Dept of Chemistry
Forum on Interdisciplinarity in Science

Cambridge University Chemical Society, in association with the Royal Society of Chemistry, is delighted to present a forum on...

* Interdisciplinarity in Science *

Featuring a diverse panel of leading researchers and government advisors, we will debate how the increasingly interdisciplinary nature of certain areas of science impacts on the potential career paths of young scientists.

Discussion topics will include issues that will be relevant from a careers perspective, such as funding opportunities, and research impact, as well as problems of knowledge management and balance between breadth and depth. We will also examine how interdisciplinarity can shape a scientific education, preparing students for research in areas that draw upon many different fields.

Chairing the debate will be Quentin Cooper, presenter of BBC Radio 4's weekly science programme, The Material World.

The forum will take place on Tuesday 29th April, starting at 5.30pm, in the
Bristol-Myers Squibb Lecture Theatre, Department of Chemistry.
More information...

25th April

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
Crystallography of Nanostructures: Complementary TEM and EBSD Analysis

Dr Caterina Ducati
(Dept. of Materials Science & Metallurgy, University of Cambridge)

Thursday 24th April

7 for 7:30pm
T001
CAMSoc lecture - "Organic Semiconductors for Flexible Electronics"

Presented by Professor Henning Sirringhaus of the Cavendish Laboratory here in Cambridge.

As usual, refreshments will be available in the Tea Room from 7.00pm and all are welcome to attend.

Wed 23 april

12:45 PROMPT
Tearoom
BBQ for St George

Tickets £2.50. Arrive promptly at tearoom.

11th April

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
Mechanical Properties of Silicate Glasses from Atomistic Computer Simulations

Prof. Alastair Cormack
(Kazuo Inamori School of Engineering, Alfred University, New York, USA)

March 26th

11.00am
T001
Corrosion and electrochemistry group seminars: Pushing the limits - Materials in Oil and Gas Production

Dr Andrew J Leonard, BP

Abstract:
Materials for oil and gas production have to be capable of delivering safe operations in a wide range of harsh environments. As most easily reached production is tied up with National Oil Companies, International Oil and Gas Producers, such as BP, are increasingly operating in ever harsher and less accessible environments. The materials used have to keep up with the demands to produce in more and more corrosive environments, deep water and extremes of temperature.

Andrew Leonard is a Metallurgist and Corrosion Engineer at BP and will speak on some of the challenges facing Materials and Corrosion Engineers as materials are pushed to their limits to meet the demand for energy.

Wednesday 19th March 2008

4.00 pm. 25 min + 5 mins Qs
T001 (Materials Science Tower)
Device Materials Group Seminar - Nano-structuring of YBCO Thin Films for Increased Critical Current

Sophie Harrington

18 March

3pm
T001
EM group seminar: "Bonding at Screw Dislocations in b.c.c. Metals Studied by Electron Energy Loss Spectrosopy"

Speaker: Suneel Motru of University of Liverpool, but based at the SuperSTEM facility at Daresbury.

Abstract: With the ability to analyse materials at atomic resolution and perform high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) simultaneously at the SuperSTEM, it is now possible to examine screw dislocation cores. The nature screw dislocations in transition metals has been a topic of primary interest for many years (screw dislocations have been implicated in the low temperature dependence of flow stress of bcc transition metals).

We attempt to identify both the local electronic structural changes using EELS and lattice structural changes by atomic resolution imaging. In particular, we have investigated the cores of ½ [111] screw dislocations in pure molybdenum (and mixed dislocations associated with an edge component). Simulations of the dislocation core have been used to generate theoretical EELS spectra by FEFF8 codes (we were careful to take into account the all-important d-bands and the effect of breaking local symmetry), which were compared with changes seen in the experimental spectra .

Variations were observed in the spectra near the M4,5 (3d3/2, 3d5/2) energy peaks for molybdenum show the presence of local electronic structural change near the cores of dislocations, which could be attributed to the electronic transitions and the density of unoccupied states available in transition metals. The changes at the core of dislocation, due to local symmetry breaking, do seem to alter the electronic structure.

Tuesday 11 March

12:30 - 2pm
Tearoom
QUIZ

£2 per person. Max team size of 6 people. CASH PRIZES. Light nibbles. Register in advance at Reception

Tuesday 11th March

7:30pm
T001
CAMSoc lecture - "Joining Ceramic Materials - Can it be that difficult?"

The next CAMSoc lecture will take place on Tuesday 11th March here in the Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy. The presentation will be given by Professor Robin Drew and will be entitled "Joining Ceramic Materials - Can it be that difficult?"

As usual, the lecture will take place in T001 at 7.30pm and refreshments will be available in the Tea Room from 7.00pm.

All are welcome to attend. We look forward to seeing you on that evening.

Serena

7th March

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
New Dynamic AFM Methods for Biological Systems

Dr. Johannes Preiner
(Institute for Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University of Linz)

Wednesday 5th March 2008

4.00 pm. 25 min + 5 mins Qs
T001 (Materials Science Tower)
Device Materials Group Seminar - Beyond the Curie transition: new mechanisms and material microstructures for magnetic cooling

Karl Sandeman

4th March 2008

3pm, 1 hour
T001
Electrical Transport and Optical Properties

Mathias Kobylko,
Laboratoire de Physique des Solides,
University of Paris South

Wednesday 27th February 2008

4.00 pm. 25 min + 5 mins Qs
T001 (Materials Science Tower)
Device Materials Group Seminar - Chemical Tuning of Positive and Negative Magnetoresistances, and Superconductivity in 1222-Type Ruthenocuprates

Falak Sher

Tuesday 26th February

3pm, 1 hour
T001
Electron Microscopy Group Seminar: Title to be announced

David McComb
London Centre for Nanotechnology,
Imperial College London.

20/02/2008

11am. 25 min + 5 min questions
T001 (Materials Science Tower)
Device Materials Group Seminar - Tunneling Anisotropic Magnetoresistance in p-type III-V Ferromagnetic Semiconductor-based tunnel junctions

Henri Jaffres (UMP CNRS/Thales, France)

19th February 2008

3pm, 1 hour
T001
Electron Microscopy Group Seminar: "Phase contrast/retrieval as a quantitative link to the physics of nanomaterials"

Marco Beleggia
School of Process, Energy and Materials Engineering, University of Leeds and Brookhaven National Laboratory, US

19th Feb

7 for 7:30pm
TWI - see text
CAMSoc Lecture - "Refractory Metals - A Welding Challenge"

The next CAMSoc Lecture will take place on Tuesday 19th February. Please note that the meeting will held at TWI - NOT here in the Department.

The title of the lecture is "Refractory Metals - A Welding Challenge" and will be presented by David Rowe of Cedar Metals Ltd.
As usual refreshments will be available from 7.00pm and the lecture will commence at 7.30pm.

The event will take place in G3, Main Reception, TWI, Grant Park, Abington, Cambridge CB21 6AL.

For more details contact John Weston (weston559@btinternet.com).

Wed 13 Feb

12:45
Tearoom
Play Your Cards Right BBQ

BBQ with a difference. Some lucky BBQ go'ers will be randomly selected to play to win prizes. £2.50 a ticket

Tuesday 12th February

3pm, 1 hour
T001
Electron Microscopy Group Seminar: "Bonding at screw dislocations in b.c.c. metals studied by electron energy loss spectroscopy

Suneel Munro
University of Liverpool & SuperSTEM

Tuesday 12th February

6 for 6.30pm
T001
Cambridge heat of the 2008 IoMMM Lecture Competition

The Cambridge heat of the 2008 IoMMM Lecture Competition will take place on the evening of Tuesday 12th February.

This is an event which aims to judge the presentation skills of young Materials Scientists and their ability to communicate with a generalist audience a Materials-related topic of their choice. The Cambridge area has had success in previous years with a number of our presenters being selected to compete in regional heats and in the National final (held at the Armourer's Hall in London) and I hope that we will have continued success this year.

We have four competitiors this year and a very interesting selection of topics...

As usual the format will include refreshments from 6.00pm in the Tea Room. The competition will then take place in T001. Once all of the presentations have been given, then there will be more refreshments in the Tea Room while the judges make their decision. The competition and prize giving should be finished by about 8.30pm.

I hope that we can have a good level of support for our competitors - and I look forward to seeing you on that evening.

With regards,

Dr Serena Best

smb51@cam.ac.uk

Wednesday 6th February

3pm, 1 hour
T001
Electron Microscopy Group Seminar: Title to be announced

Angus Wilkinson
Materials Department,
University of Oxford

Wednesday 6th February 2008

4.00 pm. 25 min + 5 mins Qs
T001 (Materials Science Tower)
Device Materials Group Seminar - Transport effects in nanoscale junctions based on perovksites

Thomas Fix

Tuesday 4th February

3pm, 1 hour
T001
Electron Microscopy Group Seminar: "Electrical transport and optical properties of carbon nanotubes probed by in situ and cross-correlated experiments"

Mathias Kobylko
Laboratoire des Physique Solides,
Paris-Sud University, France

31st January 2008

3pm, 1 hour
T001
*** New Date *** Electron Microscopy Group Seminar: "Atomic scale characterization, by means of electron microscopy techniques, of Ruthenium catalysts supported on cerium and zirconim mixed oxides"

Juan-Carlos Hernandez
University of Cambridge and University of Cadiz, Spain

Abstract: The vertiginous growth of the electron microscopy techniques in the recent past has allowed, among other things, structural and nanoanalytical techniques together in the same instrument. Thus it is possible to analyze in a simultaneous way, the structure of the materials on atomic scale and its chemical composition. With the objective to prepare interesting catalytic materials in diverse chemical processes related to the environmental catalysis, a comprehensible effort has been dedicated to the characterization of catalysts constituted by Ruthenium as metallic phase and diverse Cerium mixed oxides as support.

25th January

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
Hybrid Inorganic-Organic Framework Materials and their Applications

Prof. Anthony K. Cheetham
(Dept. of Materials Science & Metallurgy, University of Cambridge)

Wednesday 23rd January 2008

4.00 pm. 25 min + 5 mins Qs
T001 (Materials Science Tower)
Device Materials Group Seminar - Interpaly between Er and Co magnetism in ErCo2

Julia Herrero-Albillos

Tuesday 22nd January

20:00-22:00
Lucy Cavendish College
Cambridge Association for Women in Science and Engineering 2008-2009: Annual General Meeting and Networking Event

We kick of our AWiSE 2008 events with our Annual General Meeting and Networking Event on Tuesday 22nd January at 8 pm at Lucy Cavendish College. The short formal part of this meeting will give everyone the opportunity to find out more about the organisation and how we run. We will also be giving everyone plenty of time to network and make new professional and social contacts.

This meeting is FREE but please email me at info@camawise.org.uk to register so I know how much cake and port we need!

best wishes and Happy New Year
Dr. Lucinda Spokes.
AGM flyer

18th January

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
Synthesis and Elastic Properties of MAX Phases

Prof. Jochen M. Schneider
(Dept. of Materials Chemistry, Aachen University)

Thursday 13 December

11:30 am
Babbage Lecture Theatre
Annual Meeting of the Department of Materials Science

This event is for everyone in the Department, so please come along to hear about the highlights of the year.

Thursday 13 Dec

8pm to Midnight
Howard Building, Downing college
Christmas Party 2008

£5 per ticket, luxury buffet food provided, dance the night away

Wed 12 Dec

4pm - 25 minute talks and 5 minutes of questions
T001
DEVICE MATERIALS GROUP SEMINARS - Angular Critical Current Measurements on Coated Conductors

Marcus Weigand

Thursday 6th December 2007

7pm for 7:30pm
T001
CAMBRIDGE AND ANGLIAN MATERIALS SOCIETY - "The Tay Bridge Disaster - Act of God or Gross Negligence"

Speaker - Peter Lewis from the Department of Materials Engineering at the Open University

As usual, the meeting will be held at the Department of Materials Science and
Metallurgy, New Museums Site, Pembroke Street, University of Cambridge

Light refreshments available from 7.00 pm, lecture commences at 7.30 pm.

Anyone who wishes to attend this presentation, and learn more about this
fascinating area, is very welcome.

For more information, please contact

Mike Fitzpatrick
tel - 001908 653100;
email - m.e.fitzpatrick@open.ac.uk
or Geoff Hale
tel - 01223 338139; e-mail - geoff.hale@pem.cam.ac.uk

----------Synopsis ----------

"In 1879 the Tay Bridge was the longest bridge in the world, spanning two miles
across the Tay estuary in southeastern Scotland. On the evening of December
28, 1879, the central part of the span-the so-called high girders-suddenly
collapsed, leaving a gap of well over a half-mile. Most disturbing was that the
two-year-old bridge collapsed while an express passenger train from Edinburgh
was making its way across. The resulting accident claimed the lives of 75
victims, making it one of the most catastrophic structural failures in Britain´s
history.

More than 125 years later the cause of the disaster seems to remain in doubt. In
a recent book, "Beautiful Railway Bridge of the Silvery Tay" (Tempus Publishing),
we have attempted to put an end to the uncertainty. By re-examining the wealth
of surviving evidence-in particular the photographic archive and the records
from the formal accident investigation of 1880-we have re-assessed the various
theories of how and why the bridge came down."

30th November

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
Following Meso/Microstructural Evolution in Three Dimensions by X-ray Microtomography

Prof. Phil J. Withers
(The School of Materials
University of Manchester)
Gordon Laboratory Seminar Series

Wed 28 Nov

4pm - 25 minute talks and 5 minutes of questions
T001
DEVICE MATERIALS GROUP SEMINARS - Magnetoelectric coupling

Casey Israel

Tuesday 27th November 2007

3pm, 1 hour
T001
Valence Changes and Structural Distortions in ‘Charge Ordered’ Manganites Quantified by Atomic-Scale Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

Dr James Loudon

Dept of Materials Science & Metallurgy, University of Cambridge

Abstract: We investigate the microscopic nature of the ‘charge ordering’ modulation in mixed-valent manganites in real space using scanning transmission electron microscopy. The modulation in Bi0.5Sr0.4Ca0.1MnO3 has a uniform periodicity appearing as stripes in high-angle annular dark field images. Geometric phase analysis shows the modulation to be a displacement wave with transverse amplitude (0.008 ± 0.001)a and longitudinal amplitude (0.003 ± 0.001)a. Energy loss spectra taken across the stripes show no periodic changes and place an upper bound of ±0.04 on any valence changes of the Mn ions.

23rd November

2.15 pm
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
Localised Through-The-Thickness Reinforcement of Polymer Composites

Prof. Ivana K. Partridge
(Composites Centre, Cranfield University)
Gordon Laboratory Seminar Series

Wed 21 Nov

4pm - 25 minute talks and 5 minutes of questions
T001
DEVICE MATERIALS GROUP SEMINARS - Atomic structure and electronic structure from transmission electron microscopy

Rong Yu

Tues 20 Nov

12:45
Tearoom
Quiz

Register your team in advance at Reception or Accounts. £2 per person, teams to consist of 4-6 people. Snacks provided.

16th November

2.15 pm
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
Tailored Surfaces with Tunable Adhesion

Dr Aránzazu del Campo
(Max-Planck-Institut für Metallforschung, Stuttgart, Germany)
Gordon Laboratory Seminar Series

Wed 14 Nov

4pm - 25 minute talks and 5 minutes of questions
T001
DEVICE MATERIALS GROUP SEMINARS - Spin transfer torque switching in nanomagnets

Atif Aziz

Tuesday 13th November

7pm for 7.30pm
T001
CAMSoc lecture - "Composite Materials, Structures and F1 Design"

Speaker: Brian O'Rourke of the Williams Grand Prix Engineering Ltd.
As always, everyone will be welcome. Light refreshments will be available in the tea room from 7.00pm

10th October

2.15 pm
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
Relevance of Mechanics in Studying Human Diseases

Dr Chwee Teck Lim
(Division of Bioengineering & Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore)

9th November

2.15 pm
Genetically Modified Mechanostats: Implications for Skeletal Competence Bone Remodelling, Repair and Replacement?

Prof. Allen Goodship
(Royal Veterinary College & Institute of Orthopaedics and Musculoskeletal Science, University College London)
Gordon Laboratory Seminar Series

Tuesday 6th November

2.00-3.00p.m.
T001 - Tower Seminar Room
Training Session for Online Literature Searching

Following on from the session on Web of Science given by Yvonne Nobis from the University Library in October, I am holding a one hour session on literature searching in general, available at the University.

The session will provide a demonstration and comparison of the main services subscribed to by the University - Web of Science, SciFinder Scholar and CSA Illumina (Cambridge Scientific Abstracts), as well as a demonstration of using EndNote on the Web to help manage bibliographic references.

The session will be suitable for anyone, whether you have tried your hand at online searching yet or not.

Please come along if you can.

Janice
MSM Library

2nd November

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
Biological Fibrous Networks

Dr Alexandre J. Kabla
(Dept. of Engineering, University of Cambridge)
Gordon Laboratory Seminar Series

26th October

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
Bio-inspired Materials: Applications in Tissue Engineering and Nanotechnology

Dr Molly Stevens
(Dept. of Materials, Imperial College)

Wednesday 24 Oct 2007

12:45
Tearoom
BBQ

Tickets £2.50 each. Available from Reception and Tearoom. Please let Del Hawtin know if you are vegetarian.

Thursday 18th October

7.00pm for 7.30pm
T001
CAMSoc lecture: Designing Materials and Processes for Optimal Clinical and Commercial Performance - A Case Study of CADisc, a Total Spine Disc Replacement Implant

Dr. Geoffrey Andrews of Ranier Technology.

As always, everyone will be welcome. Light refreshments will be available in the Tea Room from 7.00pm.

Further information from Dr Serens Best, smb51@cam.ac.uk

Aug 8th 2007

4pm - 5pm
T001
DMG Seminar

Amit Desai - Fabrication and Characterization of Titanium-doped Hydroxyapatite thin films.

Thursday 26th July 2007

3:00pm
T001
EM Group Seminars: Failure analysis of semiconductor lasers

Richard Beanland
Bookham Technology, Caswell
Further details

Friday 20 July

Cricket start 11am. BBQ at 1pm
Gonville & Caius sportsground
STAFF v STUDENTS CRICKET MATCH

Tuesday 19 June

5pm to 8pm
Darwin College Island
Garden Party

Celebrate finishing your exams with a relaxing cocktail by the shores of the River Cam. Tickets £5 each. Undergraduates FREE!!

12th June

1.30pm to 6.30pm
Babbage lecture theatre
Armourers and Brasiers' Cambridge Forum
Forum website

8th June

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
Coating Development by Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation: Tracing Locations of Film Growth

Prof. George Thompson
(School of Materials, Manchester University)

Tue, 05 Jun 2007

3pm
T001
EM Group Seminars: 3D imaging of nanomaterials by discrete tomography

Dr Joost Batenburg, Department of Physics, University of Antwerp
Further details

1st June

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
Time-Resolved Diffraction of Phase Transformations in Steels

Dr Howard Stone
(Dept. of Materials Science & Metallurgy, Cambridge University)

25th May

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
Size Effect in Microcellular Aluminium Plasticity

Dr. Russell Goodall (Laboratory of Mechanical Metallurgy, EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland)

Thusday 24 May

12:45
Tearoom
Summer BBQ

Come and enjoy a classic British BBQ in your Department. Tickets still just £2. Availble from Reception and the Tearoom

18th May

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
Making an Impact with Nanoindentation

Dr Nigel Jennett
(National Physical Laboratory)

Tue, 15 May 2007

3pm
T001
EM Group Seminars: Electron diffractive imaging of extended object

Dr Christian Dwyer, Department of Materials, University of Oxford
Further details

11th May

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
Diamond Wires, Fibres, Tubes, Coils, and the Potential for Diamond Fibre Reinforced Composites

Dr Paul May
(School of Chemistry, Bristol University )

4th May

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
Intergranular Corrosion and Stress-Corrosion Cracking in 2024 Aluminium Alloy

Prof. Christine Blanc
(CNRS, CIRIMAT (Inter-University Centre for Research in Materials Engineering), University of Paul Sabatier, Toulouse, France)

27th April

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
Small Scale Plasticity In-Situ X-Ray/Neutron Diffraction and Computational Modeling

Prof. Helena Van Swygenhoven
(Paul Scherrer Institute, EPFL-STI, Lausanne, Switzerland)

Monday 23 April

Lunchtime 12:30
Tearoom
Brains of the Department Quiz

CASH PRIZES. £10 per team to enter. Teams of no more than 6 people. Register at reception, accounts or email details to Del (dlh34@msm.cam. Light snacks provided

Wed 11 Apr

4pm - 25 minute talks and 5 minutes of questions
T001
DEVICE MATERIALS GROUP SEMINARS - Growth and characterisation of MgO on narrow gap semiconductors for spin injection

Laura Singh

Wed 4 Apr

4pm - 25 minute talks and 5 minutes of questions
T001
DEVICE MATERIALS GROUP SEMINARS - Ordered, porous alumina templates for device fabrication

Adam Robinson

Wed 21 Mar

4pm - 25 minute talks and 5 minutes of questions
T001
DEVICE MATERIALS GROUP SEMINARS - NdGaO3 as a substrate for YBCO (tbc)

Stuart Wimbush

17th March 2007

2pm - 5pm
Arup building, teaching labs
Cambridge Science Festival 2007

Fun experiments and exhibitions for the public including:
SeeK challenges and NanoFen activities on: "Emulsions and Foams: Making Ice Cream" & "Iron, Steels and their Oxides: From Railway Lines to Nanoscience"
Festival program

16th March

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
Ceramic Nanostructures and Functionalised Coatings used in Biomaterials

Prof. David M. Grant
(School of Mechanical, Materials and Manufacturing Engineering, Nottingham University)
Gordon Laboratory Seminar Series

Wed 7 Mar

4pm - 25 minute talks and 5 minutes of questions
T001
DEVICE MATERIALS GROUP SEMINARS - First order reversal curve (FORC) measurements of iron oxides

Julia Linke

2nd March

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
Fatigue of Joints

Dr Ian A. Ashcroft
(School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Loughborough University)
Gordon Laboratory Seminar Series

23rd February

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
Dedicated Implant Surfaces

Prof. John A. Jansen
(Dept. of Periodontology and Biomaterials, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center)
Gordon Laboratory Seminar Series

Wed 21 Feb

4pm - 25 minute talks and 5 minutes of questions
T001
DEVICE MATERIALS GROUP SEMINARS - Transformation of spin information into large electrical signals via carbon nanotubes

Neil Mathur

16th February

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
Use of Nanoindentation to assess the Reliability of low-k/Cu Interconnects

Dr Jon M. Molina-Aldareguia
(CEIT and TECNUN, San Sebastián, Spain)
Gordon Laboratory Seminar Series

Wed 7 Feb

4pm - 25 minute talks and 5 minutes of questions
T001
DEVICE MATERIALS GROUP SEMINARS - Multilayers based on Sr2FeMoO6 deposited by pulsed laser deposition

Thomas Fix

2nd February

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
Recent Developments in the Field of Thermal Barrier Coatings

Dr Robert Vaßen
(Institute for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Jülich, Germany)
Gordon Laboratory Seminar Series

Wed 24 Jan

4pm - 25 minute talks and 5 minutes of questions
T001
DEVICE MATERIALS GROUP SEMINARS - Exchange bias in magnetic thin-films

Rantej Bali

19th January

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
Properties and Potential Applications for Nanostructured Hard Ceramic Thin Films

Dr Paul H. Mayrhofer
(Dept. of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversität Leoben, Austria)
Gordon Laboratory Seminar Series

Friday 12 January

all day (times tbc)
T001
'Teaching Skills' course

For new PhD students, postdocs welcome as well.

For more information contact Dr Rosie Ward

Mon 11th December

12 noon
T001
Web of Knowledge demonstration

A representative from the University Library will be visiting the Department to give a talk and demonstration of the Web of Knowledge. Please come along if you would like to hear more. (This talk is a repeat of the one given in October).

THURSDAY 7 DECEMBER 2006

8PM TO MIDNIGHT
UNIVERSITY CENTRE
CHRISTMAS PARTY 2006

Bigger and better than last year, make sure you buy a ticket when they go on sale to avoid disappointment. Check email and lift noticeboard for further details

Wed 6 Dec

4pm for 30 minutes
T001
Artificial magnetic domains in Pt/Co/Pt

Atif Aziz

5th Dec 2006

7:30pm
T001
CAMSoc lecture: Through A Glass Darkly

Speaker: Professor Lindsay Greer.
His lecture will cover modern studies of the glassy state from golf, to frozen frogs to memory.

As always, refreshments will be available in the Tea Room from 7.00pm and all are welcome to attend.

Mon, 04 Dec

3pm
T001
EM Group Seminars: Three-dimensional imaging and analysis using aberration-corrected STEM

Pete Nellist, Department of Materials, University of Oxford.
All welcome.
Further details

Wed 29 Nov

4pm for 30 minutes
T001
Inhomogeneous superconductivity in La0.67Sr0.33MnO3- YBa2Cu3O7- La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 trilayers

Kartik Senapati

24th November

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
Polymer Derived Ceramics

Prof. Dr. Peter Greil
(Dept. of Materials Science, University of Erlangen)

Wed, 22 Nov 2006

3pm
T001
EM Group Seminars: Next generation electron detectors for TEM: an introduction

Grigore Moldovan, Department of Materials, University of Oxford.
All welcome.
Further details

17th November

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
Multiple Step Martensitic Transformations in Ni-rich NiTi Single Crystals

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Gunther Eggeler
(Institute of Materials, Ruhr-University of Bochum, Germany)

16th November

10:30 - 16:00
MSM
Visit from Chinese Delegation from Chongqing University

The programme for the day, involves a few talks from members of staff, a tour around the Department and a buffet lunch with posters.
Further information

Wed 15 Nov

4pm for 30 minutes
T001
High rate hybrid liquid phase epitaxy growth of YBa2Cu3O7 films for coated conductor applications

Ahmed Kursumovic

10th November

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
Biomechanical Conditioning in Tissue Engineering - An Essential Strategy for Functional Repair

Prof. Dan L. Bader
(Dept. of Engineering, Queen Mary University of London)

Thursday 9th November

7:30pm
T001
CAMSoc lecture: Indigenous Silver Production in Porco, Bolivia

The talk will be given by Claire Cohen of the Institute of Archaeology, UCL.

As usual, refreshments will be available in the Tea Room from 7.00pm and the talk will start at 7.30pm.

Tue, 07 Nov 2006

3pm
T001
EM Group Seminars: Nano-structural and chemical characterisation of supported noble metal catalysts using Transmission Electron Microscopy techniques

José A. Pérez-Omil, Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge
Further details

3rd November

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
Segregation of Particles and Surfactant during Drying of Colloidal Films

Dr. Alex F. Routh
(Dept. of Chemical Engineering, University of Cambridge)

Wed 1 Nov

4pm for 30 minutes
T001
Giant sharp magnetoelectric switching in multiferroic epitaxial La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 on BaTiO3

Neil Mathur

31st Oct

3pm
T001
EM Group Seminars: Some ideas how to improve quantification of chemical signals in transmission electron microscopy studies of very thin layers

Thomas Walther, Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Sheffield
Further details

27th October

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
Cantilever-based Mass and Force Sensors for assessment of Mechanical Properties of Nanowires inside Scanning Electron Microscopes

Dr. Ivo Utke
(Nanomechanics and Nanostructuring Group, EMPA, Switzerland)

Friday 27 October

2pm
Austin Building Lecture Theatre
****CANCELLED**** Graduate lecture: Web of Knowledge demonstration

***Cancelled due to technical difficulties with WoS today***
Speaker: Ms Yvonne Nobis
For more information contact Dr Rosie Ward.

Tuesday 24 October 2006

3pm
T001
EM Group Seminars: Scanning probe microscopy of GaN: Beyond pretty pictures

Rachel Oliver, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge
Further details

20th October

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
Stress Analysis and Particle Tracking during the Compaction of Pharmaceutical Powders

**new date**
Dr. James A. Elliott
(Dept. of Materials Science, University of Cambridge)

Friday 20 October

2:00 pm
Austin Building Lecture Theatre
Graduate lecture: Web of Knowledge demonstration

Speaker: Ms Yvonne Nobis
For more information contact Dr Rosie Ward. This demonstration is repeated on Friday 27 October for those who can not attend this session.

Thursday 19th October

7.30 pm
T001
CAMBRIDGE AND ANGLIAN MATERIALS SOCIETY: Materials Issues for Power Generation from Renewable Sources

Speaker: Dr David Gooch, Chair, Materials Science and Technology Division, Institute
of Materials, Minerals and Mining.

Synopsis:The economic viability and market penetration of renewable energy technologies
are often dependent upon materials developments to increase efficiency,
decrease maintenance costs and increase operational life. This talk will address
the current UK renewable energy scene, describing briefly the major
technologies available for the exploitation of wind, water, sun and biomass and
discussing the materials issues associated with those technologies.

The author is now a materials technology consultant, having 30 years previous
experience in the power generation industry.
------------------

Light refreshments available from 7.00 pm, lecture commences at
7.30 pm.

Non-Members are very welcome and we look forward to seeing anyone at the
meeting who has an interest in renewable energy issues.

For more information, please contact
Serena Best
tel - 01223 334307;
email - Serena Best <smb51@hermes.cam.ac.uk>
or Geoff Hale
tel - 01223 338139; e-mail - geoff.hale@pem.cam.ac.uk

Wed 18 Oct

4pm for 30 minutes
T001
Cross-over between channeling and pinning at twin boundaries in YBa2Cu3O7 thin films

Anna Palau

Tue, 17 Oct 2006

3pm
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
EM Group Seminars: Time and Frequncy as New Frontiers in Microscopy

Archi Howie, Department of Physics, University of Cambridge
Further details

16 October

**Change of time** now 2:15pm, for 45 minutes
Austin Building Lecture Theatre
Direct measurement of the magnetocaloric effect using a novel differential scanning calorimeter with magnetic field

Stinus Jeppesen
(Risoe National Laboratory, Denmark)

13th October

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
Determining the Mechanical and Flow Properties of Materials at the Mesoscale using X-ray Microtomography

**new date**
Prof. Peter D. Lee
(Dept. of Materials, Imperial College London)

Thursday 12 October

12:45pm
Tearoom
BBQ

Come and enjoy the first department BBQ of this academic year. Tickets must be purchased in advanced - for only £2 - from Reception or the Tearoom

Monday 9th October

4pm
T001
3D crystallography and Mesoscale Mechanical Modelling of commercial Stainless Steel

Alexis Lewis, Naval Research Laboratory in Washington.

If anyone would like to meet her prior to her talk please contact Dr Cathie Rae, cr18@cam.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
As part of a multidisciplinary “Design of Naval Steels” program at the U. S. Naval Research
Laboratory, the microstructure, crystallography, and mechanical response of a commercial
superaustenitic stainless steel, AL-6XN, has been investigated. Three-dimensional (3D)
reconstructions, generated by combining serial sectioning techniques with Electron Backscatter
Diffraction (EBSD), are used for characterization of the microstructure and crystallography of
the material, and as input for 3D Image-Based Finite Element Models (IB-FEM). Using these
techniques, the distributions of crystallographic 3D grain boundary normals have been
quantified, and are shown to provide critical new information not previously attainable from the
commonly used morphological descriptors such as grain diameter, aspect ratio, or number of
facets. These analyses also include quantification of networks of special boundaries and triple
junctions in 3D. Image-based finite element simulations, with the 3D microstructure and
crystallography as input, were performed to determine the critical microstructural features at
which failure is likely to initiate, and the interactions between microstructure and mechanical
response are discussed.

6th October

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
Nanoparticles: Do they swarm?

Prof. Kevin Kendall
(Dept. of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham)

Thursday 5 October

4.00 pm
T 001
Transport and magnetic properties in strong ferromagnetic pi-junctions

Samanta Piano

Dipartimento di Fisica "E. R. Caianiello" | Tel : +39 089 965273
Universita' di Salerno, INFM | Fax : +39 089 965275
Via S.Allende, I-84081, Baronissi (SA), Italy. | e-mail : samanta@sa.infn.it
http://www.sa.infn.it/Personal/Homepage.asp?samanta
now visiting: Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Device Materials Group, Cambridge (UK)
http://www.msm.cam.ac.uk/dmg/GroupInfo/stafflistnew.html

29th September

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
Plasma Spray Processing in the Nanoworld

Prof. Joachim Heberlein
(Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota)

Thu, 21 Sep 2006

11:30
T001
EM Group Seminars: Broader Horizons and a Narrower Focus: Expanding the capability and applicability of 3D electron microscopy

Dr Matthew Weyland, Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, Melbourne

All welcome.
Further details

18th September

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
Advanced Composite Structures Research & Development in Australia

Prof. Murray L. Scott
(Cooperative Research Centre for Advanced Composite Structures, Melbourne, Australia)

31 August

4pm
T001, MSM
Ferroelectricity in thin perovskite films and artificial ferroelectric materials with tailored properties

Speaker: JM Triscone, University of Geneva

22nd to 27th August

Residential
Department of Materials Science / King's College
Sutton Trust Materials Science course

The Sutton Trust MaterialsMatters@cam residential course allows Yr 12 pupils to sample a variety of Materials Science topics and see what studying at university is all about.
Visit the course website

23rd to 27th July

Residential
Department of Materials Science / King's College
Headstart Focus Course: The Physical Sciences

The aim of this SCIENCE@cam course at the University of Cambridge is to introduce potential UG applicants to the way in which physical and biological sciences (including History and Philosophy of Science) are taught during the first two years of a student’s life within the university. Faculty tutors (staff and current and recent students) introduce the course participants to a range of activities largely based on chemistry, materials science and physics.
Visit the course website.

16th to 21st July

Residential
Department of Materials Science
The Goldsmiths' Science for Society Course

Science for Society Courses provide science teachers with free residential courses, aimed at broadening their perspective on subjects allied to the A-level syllabus. Each course examines areas of direct or related interest to science modules within the National Curriculum. Based in the Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy in the University of Cambridge, this course is aimed primarily at teachers of chemistry or physics. It provides an insight into the broad field of modern materials, spanning the physical sciences, engineering and biomedical applications. It includes practical demonstrations and industrial visits. There is coverage of topics as diverse as gold bars, integrated circuits and drug delivery.
Visit the course website

16th to 21st July

Residential
Department of Materials Science
The Goldsmiths' Science for Society Course

Science for Society Courses provide science teachers with free residential courses, aimed at broadening their perspective on subjects allied to the A-level syllabus. Each course examines areas of direct or related interest to science modules within the National Curriculum. Based in the Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy in the University of Cambridge, this course is aimed primarily at teachers of chemistry or physics. It provides an insight into the broad field of modern materials, spanning the physical sciences, engineering and biomedical applications. It includes practical demonstrations and industrial visits. There is coverage of topics as diverse as gold bars, integrated circuits and drug delivery.
Visit the course website

FRIDAY 14 JULY

11AM - 5PM. BBQ at 1pm
Gonville & Caius Cricket Ground
STAFF v STUDENT CRICKET MATCH

After a famous Staff victory in 2005 the students will be looking for revenge. Make sure you all come along to watch, and some of you may even wish to play!

Mon, 03 Jul 2006

11:30
T001
EM Group Seminars: Modification of Polymer/Polymer Interfaces Using Block Copolymers and Microgel Particles

Richard J Spontak, Departments of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering and Materials Science & Engineering, North Carolina State University.

All welcome
Further details

Wed 21 June

4pm (25 minutes + 5 minutes for questions)
T001
Scale dependence of nano-periodic layered structures in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8

Sang-Jae Kim

Friday 16 June

5pm to 8pm
Darwin College Island
Garden Party 2006

Come and enjoy a relaxing riverside cocktail. Tickets £5, check email and posters nearer the date

Wed 14 June

4pm (25 minutes + 5 minutes for questions)
T001
Impedance spectroscopy on multiferroic BiFeO3 epitaxial thin films

Rainer Schmidt

13th June 2006

afternoon
Babbage lecture theatre
Armourers and Brasiers' Cambridge Forum 2006

Includes the 8th Kelly lecture and the Gordon seminars

Kelly Lecture 2006 - Professor Michael Coey FRS, Trinity College, Dublin

"Magnetic Materials -- where are the limits?"
Timetable and Registration details

Tue 13 Jun

11:30
T001
EM Group Seminars: Spectrum Imaging – Challenges with Real Materials

A J Craven, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow
Further details

Tuesday 06 June 2006

3pm
Austin Seminar Room
EM Group Seminars: The development of advanced TEM techniques for the characterisation of Pt catalyst nanoparticles

Lionel Cervera, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge.
All welcome.
Further details

2nd June

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Ground Floor, Austin Building
Microscopic Processes during Shear Transformation of Metallic Glasses - a Molecular Dynamics Study

Mareike Zink
(Physikalisches Institut der Universität Göttingen, Germany)

Wed 31 May

4pm (25 minutes + 5 minutes for questions)
T001
Manganite thin films: phase diagrams, domain wall devices and no charge ordering

Diana Sánchez

Tuesday 30 May

All day, lunch provided
T001
Presentation Skills Course

This course is run in conjunction with the Staff Development Office. It is aimed primarily at first year PhD students, but other people are welcome to join in if places are available.

Tuesday 30 May 2006

3pm
Austin Seminar Room
EM Group Seminars: 3-dimensional dislocation imaging in the electron micoscope: Analysis of delamination in GaN devices

Jonathan S Barnard, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge.
All welcome.
Further details

26th May

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Ground Floor, Austin Building
Drying of Dispersions: Colloidal Interactions, Stress Development and Structural Rearrangements

Professor Lennart Bergström
(Dept. of Physical, Inorganic and Structural Chemistry, Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University, Sweden)

Thursday 25th May

7.00pm for 7:30pm
T001
CAMSoc lecture: Polymer OLEDs: Pushing Forward the Frontiers

Presented by Jeremy Burroughs of Cambridge Display Technology.

As always, refreshments will be available in the Tea Room from 7.00pm.

Wed 24 May

4pm (25 minutes + 5 minutes for questions)
T001
Grain boundaries in YBCO

John Durrell

24 May 2006

11:30 am
T001
Structural and electrical/magnetic properties of metal-oxide films grown by polymer-assisted deposition

Dr. Quanxi Jia
Fellow, Los Alamos National Lab.
Asian-American Engineer of the Year 2005

Tuesday 23 May 2006

3pm
T001
EM Group Seminars: Direct observation of vortex configurations in mesoscopic superconductors: vortex shells, magic numbers and more

Irina Grigorieva, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester.
All welcome.
Further details

22 May

14:15 - 16:45
Dept of Biochemistry (Old Addenbrookes Site)
Laser Safety for Class 3B and 4 Laser Users and Research Supervisors

This is relevant to all laser users and research supervisors:

There are still places on the next laser safety course - 22nd May 2006.

Please refer to the further info link below for up to date info.



Please book via the website (note that the next course will be held in August).
Further information from University Safety Division

19th May

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Ground Floor, Austin Building
Novel Electrohydrodynamic Processing & Forming of Advanced Materials

Professor Mohan Edirisinghe
(Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, UCL, London)

Wed 17 May

4pm (25 minutes + 5 minutes for questions)
T001
Andreev spectroscopy for measuring spin polarisation

Gavin Burnell

Tuesday 16 May 2006

3pm
T001
EM Group Seminars: Exit Wave Restoration Methods

Shery Chang, Department of Materials, University of Oxford.
All welcome.
Further details

Monday 15 May 2006

3pm
T001
EM Group Seminars: On Gray Scale Features-Based Image Classification of Textural Type Continuous Objects

Andrei Reztsov
Australian Key Centre for Microscopy & Microanalysis, Sydney, Australia.
All welcome.
Further details

12th May

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Ground Floor, Austin Building
Experiments and Simulations on the Micromechanics of Metallic Crystals and Fresh Lobster

Professor Dierk Raabe
(Max Planck Institut für Eisenforschung, Düsseldorf, Germany)

Wed 10 May

4pm (25 minutes + 5 minutes for questions)
T001
Manganites: real-space magnetic imaging of phase separation and issues of glassy behaviour

Casey Israel

Tuesday 09 May 2006

3pm
T001
EM Group Seminars: Semiconductor Structures for Quantum Information Processing

David A Williams, Hitachi Cambridge Laboratory, University of Cambridge.
All welcome.
Further details

5th May

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Ground Floor, Austin Building
Micromechanical Testing

Dr. Steve Roberts
(Dept. of Materials, University of Oxford)

Tuesday 2 May

12:00 (for one hour)
T001
What Are the Limits to Controlling the Chemical and Electronic Structure at Oxide Interfaces on an Atomic Scale?

Professor Harold Y Hwang, University of Tokyo

Tuesday 02 May 2006

3pm
T001
EM Group Seminars: Network structures in green-emitting InGaN/GaN quantum wells

Nicole van der Laak, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge.
All welcome.
Further details

28th April

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Ground Floor, Austin Building
Dyneema; an Ultra Stretched High Strength Polyethylene Fiber, Production Properties and Applications

Professor Dr Ir Roel Marissen
(DSM Dyneema, Heerlen & Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands)

Thurs 27th April 2006

7pm for 7:30pm
T001, Dept Mat Sci
CAMBRIDGE AND ANGLIAN MATERIALS SOCIETY PRESENTS - Physics of Road Accidents

by Dr Richard Lambourn
Transport Research Laboratory

Light refreshments available from 7.00 pm, lecture commences at 7.30 pm.

Non-Members are very welcome and encouraged to attend.

We hope to see you at the meeting.

For more information, please contact
Serena Best
tel - 01223 334307;
email - smb51@hermes.cam.ac.uk

Tuesday 25 April

12:45
Tearoom
BBQ

Cost £2. Check email and posters for details.

Tue 25 Apr 2006

3pm
T001
EM Group Seminars: Recent advances in specimen preparation and manipulation technology for SEM/FIB and TEM

Alan C Robins, E A Fischione Instruments Inc
.
All welcome.
Further details

Thu 20 Apr 2006

3pm
T001
EM Group Seminars: Extrinsic and Intrinsic Defects in Colloidal Photonic Crystals

Prof Doug D Perovic, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Toronto.
All welcome!
Further details

21st March 2006

7pm for 7:30pm
T001
CAMBRIDGE AND ANGLIAN MATERIALS SOCIETY PRESENTS: Innovative Electrochemical Processing using Molten Salts - from extractive metallurgy, through high technology, to space exploration.

Speaker:
Professor Derek Fray
Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy
University of Cambridge

Synopsis:
About 10 years ago it was discovered that it was possible to reduce metal oxides by simply making the metal oxide the cathode in bath of molten calcium chloride. Since that time, a significant number of systems have been investigated which demonstrate that this process could become a generic technology for many high technology alloys.

Recently, NASA has been supporting research to investigate this approach to generate oxygen from lunar rocks. These developments will be described as well as the ups and downs of commercialising University Research.

---------------------------
As usual, the meeting will be held at the Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, in Room T001. Light refreshments available from 7.00 pm, lecture commences at 7.30 pm.

Non-Members are very welcome and encouraged to attend.

For more information, please contact
Serena Best
tel - 01223 334307;
email - Serena Best <smb51@hermes.cam.ac.uk>
or Geoff Hale
tel - 01223 338139; e-mail - geoff.hale@pem.cam.ac.uk

Tue 21 Mar 2006

3pm
T001
EM Group Seminars: Energy-filtered electron holography measumements of the properties of plasmons, phonons and zero-loss electrons

Rodney A Herring, University of Victoria, Canada.
All welcome.
Further details

18th March 2006

2-4pm
201 (Teaching laboratory)
SeeKing Science: Cambridge Science Festival 2006

Join SeeK (Science and Engineering Experiments for Kids) and members of the Materials Science Department for hands-on fun activities.

A family event run as part of the Cambridge Science Festival.
Cambridge Science Festival

Tue 14 Mar 2006

3pm
T001
EM Group Seminars: Crystallography of Complex Surface Structures by LEED (Low- Energy Electron Diffraction)

Georg Held , Surface Science Group, Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge.
All welcome.
Further details

10th March

11.15 am
Gordon Lab Seminar Room (Austin Building)
Three Dimensional X-ray Microscopy and X-ray Tomography for Strain Measurements

Dr. Soeren F. Nielsen (Risoe National Laboratory, Materials Research Dept., Denmark)
Gordon Lab Seminars

Tue 7 Mar 2006

3pm
T001
EM Group Seminars: X-ray microanalysis of biological specimens at nm resolution - is it feasible?

Alice Warley, Centre for Ultrastructural Imaging, King's College London.
All welcome.
Further details

Tue 28 Feb 2006

3pm
T001
EM Group Seminars: The Surface Kinetics of the Early Stages of Oxidation of Cu and Cu-Au Thin Films

Judith C Yang , Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pittsburgh.
All welcome.
Further details

24th February

11.15 am
Gordon Lab Seminar Room (Austin Building)
Mullite - Structural Control of Properties and Phase Transformations

Prof. Hartmut Schneider (Institute of Materials Research, German Aerospace Center (DLR))
Gordon Lab Seminars

Thu 23 Feb

5pm (30 minute talk)
T001
Stretchable electronics: thin film devices on elastomeric substrates

Stephanie Lacour

Thurs 23rd February

time tbc
tbc
Local heat of the IoMMM National Lecture Competition

The local heat of the IoMMM National Lecture Competition will take place,in the Department of Materials Science on the evening of Thursday 23rd February. There are two classes within the competition: one of undergraduates (normally of 23 years and under on the 1st June 2006) and one for postgraduates (normally
of 28 years and under on 1st June 2006).

We have had considerable success in previous years with winners in the
Local- and Regional heats and a second place in the National Final. I hope
that we will have an equally high level of competition this year. Whatever
the outcome, though, the competition is usually good fun - but also good
experience.

Should you, or one of your students or colleagues be interested in
competing in this event, then please feel free to contact me if you would like an entry form or have any
questions.

Dr Serena Best (Tel: 334307 or email: smb51@cam)

Wednesday 22 Feb

1pm to 2:30
tearoom
QUIZ

!CANCELLED!

Tue 21 Feb 2006

3pm
T001
EM Group Seminars: Investigation of Cu precipitation in ferritic alloys using EFTEM, EDX mapping, HREM and 3DAP

Sergio Lozano-Perez , Department of Materials, University of Oxford.
All welcome.
Further details

17th February

11.15 am
Gordon Lab Seminar Room (Austin Building)
Modeling Interfacial Forces, Energies and Phenomena for High Temperature Technologies

Prof. George Kaptay (Faculty of Materials Science and Technology, University of Miskolc, Hungary)
Gordon Lab Seminars

Thu 16 Feb

5pm (30 minute talk)
T001
Oscillations in the Superconducting Critical Current in Sub-Micron Nb-Cu-Nb-Ni-Nb-Cu-Nb Josephson Junctions

Jason Robinson

Wed 15 Feb 2006

3pm
T001
EM Group Seminars: Dopant profiling in the TEM - progress towards quantitative electron holography

Dave Cooper, Department of Materials Science, University of Cambridge.
All welcome.
Further details

Monday 13th Feb 2006

1415-1645
Seminar Room, Department of Biochemistry, Old Addenbrooke's Site
Class 3B and 4 Laser Users Safety Course

Department of Biochemistry,
http://www.cam.ac.uk/map/v3/drawmap.cgi?mp=oadd;xx=304;yy=336;mt=c

This course is an essential component of training for new laser users, which should be backed up by practical training in departments.

This course provides an introduction to laser safety and the relevant regulations and standards that apply to laser use. It includes the biological effects of laser radiation on the eye and skin, risk assessment (with examples), a simple beam hazard assessment and how to apply practical control measures.

This course may be suitable for users of other classes of lasers, depending on the risk, but please discuss this with your Departmental Laser Safety Officer first.

Book a place on this course on our website, by email or by phone

Health and Safety Division
16 Mill Lane

Telephone: 33301
Email: safety@admin.cam.ac.uk
http://www.admin.cam.ac.uk/offices/safety/

10th February

11.15 am
Gordon Lab Seminar Room (Austin Building)
Thermo-Mechanical Characterization of Biodegradable Biomaterials: How to Make it Relevant?

Prof. João F. Mano (Dept. of Polymer Engineering, University of Minho, Portugal)
Gordon Lab Seminars

Thu 9 Feb

5pm (30 minute talk)
T001
Energy barrier distributions in interacting magnetic nanoparticle systems

Adam Robinson

Thursday 9th February

7pm fopr 7:30pm
T001
Steel Construction: Joining Matters

CAMBRIDGE AND ANGLIAN MATERIALS SOCIETY
Speaker: Dr Richard Dolby, President of the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining

This lecture will discuss trends in welding technology in the steel construction, oil and gas, and power generation industrial sectors, and the importance of welding to safety and reliability. The emphasis is on cost reduction through increased rates of weld deposition and the application of mechanised and robotic processes, without sacrifice to quality. Ship construction has led the way in using robotics, cutting lasers and hybrid laser-arc welding processes for plate up to 25mm thickness. Some recent trends in deep water oil and gas exploration and hydro-
electric power generation will be discussed, which are demanding extremely careful control of the welding processes to prevent failure in service by fracture and fatigue, and protect the environment.

Non-Members are very welcome and encouraged to attend.
FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT: Serena Best tel - 01223 334307; email - Serena Best <smb51@hermes.cam.ac.uk> or Geoff Hale tel - 01223 338139; e-mail - geoff.hale@pem.cam.ac.uk

Thursday 9th February

4pm
T001
Materials Chemistry Group Seminar

Mario Cordero-Cabrera

"Highly Textured La2Zr2O7 and CeO2 Buffer Layers by Ink Jet Printing for Coated Conductors"

Tue 7 Feb 2006

3pm
T001
EM Group Seminars: EBSD for the Study of Novel Fine Grained Alloys for Structural and Functional Applications

Simon C Hogg, Department of Materials, University of Oxford.
All welcome.
Further details

3rd February

11.15 am
Gordon Lab Seminar Room (Austin Building)
Carbon Nanotube Fibres

Prof. Alan H. Windle (Dept. of Materials Science, University of Cambridge)
Gordon Lab Seminars

Thu 2 Feb

5pm (30 minute talk)
T001
Inherent magnetic granularity of epitaxial superconducting coated conductors

Anna Palau

Thu 26 Jan

5pm (30 minute talk)
T001
Nanostructures for organic solar cells

Lukas Schmidt-Mende

24th January 2006

4pm
T001, Dept MSM
Toroidal ordering in multiferroics

Manfred Fiebig (Max-Born-Institut, Berlin)

Multiferroics are materials with a coexistence of different forms of long- range ordering. Among them, the
ferromagnetic ferroelectrics are of particular interest because the coupling between magnetic and electric properties
may allow one to control magnetizations by electric fields (or vice versa). I will discuss that the magneto-electric
coupling may also be the source of ferrotoroidic ordering --- a long-range alignment of magnetic vortices which
complements ferromagnetism, ferroelectricity and ferroelasticity as commonly acknowledged forms of ferroicity. Using
nonlinear optical detection techniques I will show that toroidic domains exist and have been observed in multiferroic
YMnO3, but were not recognized as such. Further, the possible existence of toroidal domains in LiCoPO4 and LiNiPO4
will be discussed.

Tue 24 Jan 2006

3pm
T001
EM Group Seminars: From C60 to C1000000: A review on carbon nanotube growth

Stephen Hofmann, Electrical Engineering Division, University of Cambridge.
All welcome.
Further details

20th January

11.15 am
Gordon Lab Seminar Room (Austin Building)
Diamond Based Metal Matrix Composites with High Thermal Conductivity and Tailored Coefficient of Thermal Expansion

Dr. Ludger Weber (Dept. of Materials, EPFL, Switzerland)
Gordon Lab Seminars

19th January 2006

7.00pm for 7.30pm
T001
Cambridge and Anglian Materials Society: Why does the Environment in Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy Matter?

Professor Athene Donald

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT:
Serena Best
tel - 01223 334307;
email - Serena Best <smb51@hermes.cam.ac.uk>
or Geoff Hale
tel - 01223 338139; e-mail - geoff.hale@pem.cam.ac.u

Thu 19 Jan

5pm (30 minute talk)
T001
Giant electrocaloric effect in thin film PbZr0.95Ti0.05O3

Alex Mischenko

3-6 January 2006

Dept of MS&M
Smallpeice Materials@cam Course

The second Smallpeice Materials@cam residential course will run during the first week of January. 35 Year 10 pupils will be in attendance, and will sample a variety of Materials Science topics.
Smallpeice Course website

16th December

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room (Austin Building)
Thermo-Chemical Characterisation of Mechano-Chemically Synthesised Superhard Nanocomposites

Dr. S. Barseghyan
(Inst. of General and Inorganic Chemistry, National Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Armenia)

9th December

11.15am (unless advised otherwise)
Gordon Seminar Room (Austin Building)
Non-Linear Laser Spectroscopy of Buried Interfaces

Dr P.B. Davies (Dept. of Chemistry, University of Cambridge)

8th December 2005

8 pm to midnight
****CHRISTMAS PARTY****

New and improved. Disco and buffet food in a private room in the University Centre over looking the river.

Tickets will be available at a reduced rate of just £5 each (normally £15). The party is open to anyone so long as they have a ticket - so bring your partners, friends, children.

Tickets available from Reception or the Canteen

Fri 2nd Dec

12pm
T001
'Inorganic Nanotubes and Inorganic Fullerene-like Materials: From Concept to Applications'

Prof Reshef Tenne
Department of Materials and Interfaces
Weizmann Institute, Rehovot, Israel.

December 1st 2005

4pm
T001
The Oxidation Thresholds of Various Graphite-based Carbons.

Kamal Tripuraneni

Materials Chemistry Group Seminars

Thurs 1st Dec 2005

2:15pm
T001
Pastes - the final frontier in particles?

Dr D. Ian Wilson
Paste and Powder Processing Group, Chemical Engineering,
University of Cambridge

Tue 29 Nov 2005

3pm
T001
EM Group Seminars: Electron microscopy characterization of Pd-Ni/(Ce,Zr)Ox/Al2O3 three way catalysts prepared by microemulsion

Ana B Hungria, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Cambridge
Further details

November 24th 2005

4pm
T001
Sol-gel derived TiO2 nanoporous films with high surface area for gas sensing applications.

M Reza Mohammadi

Materials Chemistry Group Seminars

21 Nov

5pm
T001
Magnetoelectric coupling in epsilon-Fe2O3 nanoparticles

M. Gich, Institut de Ciència de Materials de Barcelona (ICMAB-CSIC)

18th November

11.15am (unless advised otherwise)
Gordon Seminar Room (Austin Building)
Structural Heterogeneity in Bone: Pluses and Minuses

Prof. J.D. Currey (Dept. of Biology, University of York)

17 November 2005

12:30 pm
Canteen
Quiz time

New to the department? Then make sure you don't miss out on this opportunity to show your talents. Register your team at Reception.

Thu 17 Nov

5 pm
T001
Oscillations in the Superconducting Critical Current in Sub-Micron Nb-Cu-Nb-Ni-Nb-Cu-Nb Josephson Junctions

Jason Robinson, DMG seminar

November 17th 2005

4pm
T001
Cathodic Electrorefining – Forerunner to the FFC Process

Dr. Anthony Cox

Materials Chemistry Group Seminars

Tue 15 Nov 2005

3pm
T001
EM Group Seminars: Nitrogen in highly crystalline carbon nanotubes

Caterina Ducati, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Cambridge
Further details

11th November

11.15am (unless advised otherwise)
Gordon Seminar Room (Austin Building)
Next Generation Manufacturing Technologies

Dr. W. O'Neill (Institute For Manufacturing, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge)

10th November

4 p.m.
T001 (Tower lecture room)
Interface Engineering: ***Number 5 in a series of five lectures***

Professor Tadao Watanabe, Tohoku University

Thu 10 Nov

5 pm
T001
Functional oxides grown by electrodeposition

Ying Lin Liu, DMG seminar

November 10th

4pm
T001
Lithium Ion batteries

Xumei Ren

Materials Chemistry Group Seminars

9th November

4 p.m.
T001 (Tower lecture room)
Interface Engineering: ***Number 4 in a series of five lectures***

Professor Tadao Watanabe, Tohoku University

Tue 8 Nov 2005

3pm
T001
EM Group Seminars: Solving nanotechnology problems using electron microscopy: A catalysts industry point of view

Dogan Ozkaya, Johnson Matthey
Further details

4th November

11.15am (unless advised otherwise)
Gordon Seminar Room (Austin Building)
Modelling of Diffusion in the Superalloys

Prof. R.C. Reed (Faculty of Engineering, Dept. of Materials, Imperial College London)

Thu 3 Nov

5 pm
T001
Observation and control of the low temperature superstructure in the manganites

Susan Cox, DMG seminar

November 3rd 2005

4pm
T001
Kinetic and Microstructural Aspects in the Electrochemical Reduction of TiO2 in CaCl2

Dr Carsten Schwandt

Materials Chemistry Group Seminars

31st October

4 p.m.
T001 (Tower lecture room)
Interface Engineering: ***Number 3 in a series of five lectures***

Professor Tadao Watanabe, Tohoku University

28th October

11.15am (unless advised otherwise)
Gordon Seminar Room (Austin Building)
Life Sciences for Engineering - the Gordon Legacy

Prof. J.F.V. Vincent (Centre for Biomimetic & Natural Technologies, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Bath University)

Thu 27 Oct

5 pm
T001
Spin injection from manganites into carbon nanotubes

Luis Hueso, DMG seminar

October 27th 2005

4pm
T001
Pattern Recognition in Mathematical Modelling

Dr. Jo Fenstad

Materials Chemistry Group Seminars

Tue 25 Oct 2005

3pm
T001
EM Group Seminars - Three-dimensional imaging of ordered and disordered precipitates using dark-field TEM tomography

Dr Satoshi Hata, Department of Engineering Sciences for Electronics and Materials, Kyushu University, Japan
Further details

21st October

11.15am (unless advised otherwise)
Gordon Seminar Room (Austin Buidling)
Anodic Bonding

Dr K.M. Knowles (Dept. of Materials Science & metallurgy, University of Cambridge)

21st October 2005

3pm
Austin Building Lecture Room, MS&M
Careers Service talk

Dr Peter Harding of the Careers Service (http://www.careers.cam.ac.uk/) will give a talk. Please come along to hear about the facilities available at Stuart House, which is on Mill Lane, a short walk from the department.

Thu 20 Oct

5 pm
T001
Improved current carrying performance in MgB2 through control of Mg stoichiometry and doping

Soo Kien Chen, DMG seminar

20th October 2005

4pm
T001
Oxygen Delivery Systems

Mel Vinton

Materials Chemistry Group Seminars 2005

19th October

4 p.m.
T001 (Tower lecture room)
Interface Engineering: ***Number 2 in a series of five lectures***

Professor Tadao Watanabe, Tohoku University

17th October

4 p.m.
T001 (Tower lecture room)
Interface Engineering: ***Number 1 in a series of five lectures***

Professor Tadao Watanabe, Tohoku University

14th October

11.15am (unless advised otherwise)
Gordon Seminar Room (Austin Buidling)
3D Imaging of Fatigue Cracks in Metals using High Resolution Synchrotron X-ray Micro-Tomography

Prof. J-Y Buffiere (GEMPPM INSA Lyon)

14th October

11.15am (unless advised otherwise)
Gordon Seminar Room (Austin Buidling)
3D Imaging of Fatigue Cracks in Metals using High Resolution Synchrotron X-ray Micro-Tomography

Prof. J-Y Buffiere (GEMPPM INSA Lyon)

13 October 2005

12:45 pm
Canteen
BBQ

Buy your tickets from the Canteen and Reception for just £2 each. If you are vegetarian please tell the person you are buying the ticket from.

16 September 2005

12:30
Canteen
Autumn Quiz

Pit your wits aginst your colleagues in this Autumn battles of the brains. Register your team at Reception for £2 each. 4 people per team max.

15 July 2005

11am to 5pm. BBQ at 1pm
Gonville & Caius Cricket ground. Newnham Rd
Cricket Match: Staff v Students

The sporting event of the 2005. If you don't want to play then make sure you come along and support. There will be a BBQ at 1pm. You will need to purchase a ticket for the BBQ.

17 -22 July 2005

Residential
Department of Materials Science
The Goldsmiths' Science for Society Course

Science for Society Courses provide science teachers with free residential courses, aimed at broadening their perspective on subjects allied to the A-level syllabus. Each course examines areas of direct or related interest to science modules within the National Curriculum. Based in the Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy in the University of Cambridge, this course is aimed primarily at teachers of chemistry or physics. It provides an insight into the broad field of modern materials, spanning the physical sciences, engineering and biomedical applications. It includes practical demonstrations and industrial visits. There is coverage of topics as diverse as gold bars, integrated circuits and drug delivery.
Visit the course website.

17th to 21st July

Residential
Department of Materials Science / King's College
Headstart Focus Course: The Physical Sciences

The aim of this SCIENCE@cam course at the University of Cambridge is to introduce potential UG applicants to the way in which physical and biological sciences (including History and Philosophy of Science) are taught during the first two years of a student’s life within the university. Faculty tutors (staff and current and recent students) introduce the course participants to a range of activities largely based on chemistry, materials science and physics
Visit the course website.

26 May 2005

4pm
T001, Arup Building
From zircon to zirconium compounds - a simple approach

P.K. Tripathy

17 June 2005

5 pm to 8 pm
Darwin College Island
Garden Party 2005

Come and enjoy a classic cocktail by the banks of the river Cam in the evening summer sunshine. Tickets only £5 per person which includes all drinks and BBQ. Available from 03/06/05

9 June 2005

4pm
T001, Arup Building
Production of piezoceramics by sol-gel

Mario Cordero

10 May 2005

3pm
T001
Electron Microscopy Group Seminars: Experimental evidence for the spin-dependence of electrons reflection in magnetic multilayers

Etienne Snoeck , CEMES-CNRS, Toulouse, France
Further Details

2 June 2005

4pm
T001, Arup Building
Material design for a cancer biosensor

Hetal Patel

19 May 2005

4pm
T001, Arup Building
An electrochemical method to remove sulfur and oxygen from molten metals

Antony Cox

12 May 2005

4pm
T001, Arup Building
Oxygen for healing wounds

Vega Kotzeva

11 May 2005

12:45
Canteen
BBQ

5 May 2005

4pm
T001, Arup Building
A novel molten salt process for production of high purity sodium

K.S. Mohandas

28 April 2005

4pm
T001, Arup Building
New perspectives on the treatment of scrap battery paste

Seref Sonmez

22 April 2005

12:30 pm
Canteen
QUIZ

Test your knowledge in this battle of the brains. Make sure you register your team in advance. £2 each, max of 4 people per team.

7-8 April 2005

Trinity Hall
WORKSHOP: Tomorrow's Technology in Metals and Minerals

Submission of Abstracts & Manuscripts:

Camera-ready copies of Abstracts are invited for submission. All Abstracts must meet the deadline of 25 November 2004 and preferably be submitted electronically to Dr R Vasant Kumar at: rvk10@cam.ac.uk .
Workshop details

29 March 2005

3pm
T001
EM Group Seminars: Annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy of ferroelectric thin films

Dr A T J (Ton) van Helvoort (Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science & Technology)
Further Details

18 March 2004

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room
Gordon Laboratory Seminar Series: Processing of Micro and Nano-Structured Powders and Coatings by Solution Combustion Synthesis

Prof. C. Badini
(Mat. Sci. & Chem. Eng. Dept., Politecnico de Torino, Italy)

17 March 2005

12:45 pm
Canteen
St Patrick's Day BBQ

Come and enjoy a special BBQ in the department to celebrate St Patrick's Day. Only £2. Tickets available 3rd March from Reception

17 March 2005

Light refreshments from 7.00 pm; presentation commences at 7.30 pm.
T001
C A N C E L L E D: CAMBRIDGE AND ANGLIAN MATERIALS SOCIETY MEETING - Composites in Formula 1 and High Performance Sports Cars

Paul McBride, Managing Director of Composites Engineering Ltd

15 March 2005

3pm
T001
EM Group Seminars: Low-loss EELS Spectrum Imaging of III-V Semiconductors in a Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

Dr Mhairi Gass (Department of Materials Science, Cambridge)
Further Details

11 March 2005

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room
Gordon Laboratory Seminar Series: Materials Science of MAX-Phase Thin Films

Prof. L. Hultman
(Thin Film Division, Department of Physics, IFM, Linköping University, Sweden)

10 March 2005

4 pm
T001
Physicochemical properties of blast furnace titania slag

Shulan Wang
(Department of Chemistry, Northeastern University, China)

10 March 2005

11.30am
Maxwell Lecture Theatre, Old Cavendish Building
EM Group Seminars: Electron microscopy studies of mesoporous materials and nano-structured materials synthesized within the mesopores

Prof Osamu Terasaki (Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University)
Further Details

4 March 05

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room
Gordon Laboratory Seminar Series: Ferroelasticity and Plasticity in Barium Titanate investigated by Nanoindentation and Scanning Probe Microscopy

Prof. G.A. Schneider
(Arbeitsbereich Technische Keramik, Hamburg, Germany)

4 March 2005

11am
T001
EM Group Seminars: 3-D Compositional Imaging at the Atomic Scale: Innovations in Atom Probe Technology

Dr David J Larson (Imago Scientific Instruments, Madison, WI)
Further Details

3 March 2005

4 pm
T001
Hydrogen sensor for molten aluminium

Matthew Hills
(Materials Chemistry Group, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge)

3-4 March 2005

Downing College
UK Inorganic Combinatorial Workshop, Downing College, Cambridge,
Further details

1 March 2005

3pm
T001
EM Group Seminars: On the Nature of the Charge Density Wave Observed in (La,Ca)MnO3

Dr James Loudon (Department of Materials Science, Cambridge)
Further Details

25 February 2005

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room
Gordon Laboratory Seminar Series: Drying in Ceramic Processing

Derek Holmes (Department of Materials Science, Cambridge)

24 February 2005

4 pm
T001
Log symmetry, a new understanding of excess mixing properties

Jo Fenstad
(Materials Chemistry Group, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge)

22 February 2005

3pm
T001
EM Group Seminars: Glass in and on Oxides

Professor C Barry Carter (Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota)
Further Details

18 February 2005

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room
Gordon Laboratory Seminar Series: High Performance (Cr,Al)N-Coatings for the Application on Temperature Sensitive Machine Parts

Dr. K. Bobzin
(Materials Science Institute, RWTH Aachen University, Germany)

17 February 2005

4 pm
T001
Reclamation of Zirconium and Niobium from Zr-2.5Nb alloy scrap

Dr. P.K. Tripathy

17 February 2005

7.30 pm. Light refreshments from 7 pm
T001
CAMBRIDGE AND ANGLIAN MATERIALS SOCIETY MEETING - The Derbyshire Lead Industry

Lynn Willies.

14 Feb 2005

12:30
Canteen
Valentine's Day quiz

Enter your team now for the first quiz of 2005. Teams of 4 people. Cost £2 per person. Register at Reception Buffet food available. Cash Prizes

11 February 2005

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room
Gordon Laboratory Seminar Series: Balance of Acoustical and Vibrational Energy Dissipation Mechanisms in Open Cell Porous Foams - Results from Simulations using FEA and Biot's Theory

Prof. P. Göransson
(Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden)

10 February 2005

4 pm
T001
Development of a solid state hydrogen reference electrode for proton conductor-based hydrogen sensors

Carsten Schwandt
(Materials Chemistry Group, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge)

3 February 2005

4 pm
T001
The preparation and characterisation of nanocrystaline mixed metal oxides in the TiO2 - MnO2 system

Roger Barnett
(Materials Chemistry Group, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge)

28 January 2005

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room
Gordon Laboratory Seminar Series: Nanoindentation of Hard Materials

Finn Giuliani (Department of Materials Science, Cambridge)

27 January 2005

4 pm
T001
PEM Water Electrolysis - degradation of backing materials

Odne Burheim (Norwegian Unversity of Science and Technology)

25 January 2005

7.00 pm for 7.30 pm
T001
Wood in Sport

Dr Martin Ansell, Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Bath.
Light refreshments from 7.00 pm; presentation commences at 7.30 pm.

21 January 2005

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room
Gordon Laboratory Seminar Series: Polishing, Wear and Indentation of Alumina / SiC Nanocomposites

Dr. R.I. Todd
(Department of Materials, University of Oxford)

20 January 2005

4 pm
T001
Chilling discoveries - inexpensive materials for magnetic refrigeration at room temperature

Karl Sandeman
(Materials Chemistry Group/Device Materials Group, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge)

17 December 2004

8pm - midnight
MSM Christmas Party

15 December 2004

11.30
Babbage Lecture Theatre
Department Annual Meeting

15 December 2004

2 pm
T001
The MPhil Materials Modelling students will be presenting the results of their Teamwork Projects

Determination of elastic moduli of carbon nanotubes using molecular dynamics simulations: Jerry Zheng, Jon Goulet, Mark Morris & Saurabh Anand


Crystallisation of fine Ni-Zn Ferrite Powders produced Hydrothermally: Yang Wang, Gabriela Ridlova, Ricardo Mancera

9 December 2004

5 pm
T001
Device Materials Group seminar: Leakage currents and charger carriers in pure and aliovalent ion doped BiFe03

Xiaoding Qi

2 December 2004

5 pm
T001
Device Materials Group seminar: Flux cutting in superconductors

John Durrel

30 November 2004

7.30
T001
Cambridge and Anglian Materials Society Meeting: Landing on the Surface of Titan - the Huygens mission to Saturn's mysterious moon

Mark Leese of The Open University.
Light refreshments from 7 pm in the Tea Room.

25 November 2004

5 pm
T001
Device Materials Group Seminar: Studies of superconductor/ferromagnet heterostructures

Chris Bell

25th November 2004

2:15 pm
T001
MML seminar

Prof. Nick Quirke

"Simulating Nanoflows"

23 November 2004

3 pm
Austin Seminar Room
Dual Beam ESEM: a Multi-functional Tool for Materials and Life Sciences

Debbie Stokes , Microsci and Polymers and Colloids Group, Cavendish Laboratory

19 November 2004

11.15
Gordon Seminar Room
Gordon Lab Seminar: Modelling Thin Ferroelectric Devices

Dr John Huber
(Cambridge University Engineering Department)

18 November 2004

7 pm
T001
CAMSoc Lecture: The Gatehead Millenium Bridge

Gordon Clark of Gifford
Light refreshments will be available in the Tea Room from 6.30pm onwards.

18 November 2004

5 pm
T001
Device Materials Group Seminar: STM of manganese perovskite oxides

Christoph Renner, UCL

12 November 2004

11.15
Gordon Seminar Room
Gordon Lab Seminar: Deformation Mechanisms in Shape Memory Alloys: In-situ Experimental Studies during Thermomechanical Loads

Prof. Petr Sittner
(Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic)

12 November 2004

11.00
RR UTC meeting room
X-ray diffraction studies of epitaxial laterally overgrown (ELOG) GaN layers on sapphire substrates

Dr Jarek Domagala
Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw

11 November 2004

5 pm
T001
Device Materials Group Seminar: What Raman Spectroscopy reveals about the maechanism behind the ferromagnetism in Cr doped AIN

Karen Yates

5 November 2004

11.15
Gordon Seminar Room
Gordon Lab Seminar: The Acoustic Behaviour of Open-Celled Materials

Dr Iain Dupere
(Cambridge University Engineering Department)

4 November 2004

5 pm
T001
Device Materials Group Seminar: High-resolution calorimetry on sub-microgram sample grains.

Andreas Rydh, Argonne National Laboratory

29 October 2004

11.15
Gordon Lab
Gordon Lab Seminar: Powder Metallurgy Techniques for Developing MMCs

Dr. Elena Gordo
(Dept of Mat. Sci. and Eng., Universidad Carlos III, Leganés, Spain)

28 October 2004

5 pm
T001
Device Materials Group Seminar: Double perovskite thin films

Veni Madhav

28 October 2004

7.00 for 7.30
T001. Meet in Tea room.
CAMSoc: "Explosives"

Dr Mike Cartwright, Royal Military College of Science, Cranfield University, Shrivenham, Swindon.
The presentation will involve a few example demonstrations.

22 October 2004

12:45
Canteen
Department BBQ

Tickets on Sale from 04/10/04. £2 each.

22 October 2004

11.15
Gordon Seminar Room
Gordon Lab Seminar: Development of Ni-Free Fe-Based Alloys as New Biomaterials for Surgical Implants

Prof. Jose Lois Gonzalez-Carrasco
(Centro Nacional de Investigations Metallurgicas, CENIM-CSIC, Madrid)

21 October 2004

5 pm
T001
Device Materials Group Seminar: Disorder effects in magnetoresistive perovskite oxides

Diana Sanchez

21 October

11.30
Pfizer meeting room, T62, Arup Tower East
Scanning Acoustic Microscopy of Calcified Tissue and Tissue /Materials INTERFACES

PROFESSOR LARRY KATZ,
Distinguished Research Professor,
Biomedical Engineering and Oral Biology
University of Missouri at Kansas City, USA

16 October 2004

11.15
Gordon Seminar Room
Gordon Lab Seminar: Shape Memory Alloys Seminar

Jamie Muir Wood: Indentation of shape memory materials. Dr Yong Qing Fu: TiNi Based Shape Memory Alloy Thin Films for MEMS and Bio-MEMS Applications. Sohrab Sanjabi: Development and Characterization of Shape Memory Thin Films (Ti-Ni, Ti-Ni-X(X=Cu, Pd, Zr))

8 October 2004

11.15
Gordon Seminar Room
Gordon Lab Seminar: THE MECHANISM OF METAL-CERAMIC JOINING IN Pt-Al2O3 COMPOSITE CRUCIBLES

Dr. Peter Panfilov (Urals State University, Ekaterinburg, Russia)

20 September 2004

2:00pm
T001
Optical and Magneto-Optical Processes in Carbon Nanotubes

Junichiro Kono, Assistant Professor, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas.

Recent success in preparing individually-suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in aqueous solutions has made it possible to study the intrinsic properties of carriers and excitons in these truly one-dimensional systems. This talk will describe our recent optical, magneto-optical, and ultrafast optical studies of such unbundled SWNTs. After briefly reviewing the unique band structure and basic optical properties of semiconducting SWNTs, I will describe two recent experiments in detail: 1) using magneto-absorption, magneto-photoluminescence, and magneto-photoluminescence-excitation spectroscopies at high magnetic fields, we have detected the optical signatures of the Aharonov-Bohm phase [1], predicted more than 10 years ago [2], and 2) using ultrafast optical techniques, we have detected previously-unobserved, long interband carrier lifetimes and polarization decay times when nanotubes were excited resonantly [3,4].


1. S. Zaric et al., Science 304, 1129 (2004). 2. H. Ajiki and T. Ando, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 62, 1255 (1993). 3. G. N. Ostojic et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 117402 (2004). 4. Y. Hashimoto et al., in: Quantum Electronics and Laser Science Conference, OSA Technical Digest (OSA, Washington DC, 2004), IPDB4.

17 September 2004

2:30pm
T001
Investigating magnetic materials for spintronics

Professor R Seshadri, Materials Department and Materials Research Laboratory, University of California, Santa Barbara

We discuss some recent investigations on bulk and nanoparticulate
inorganic materials which exemplify the great current interest in the
field of spintronics, a spin-based vision of electronics. The emphasis of
our work is to demonstrate that the chemistry of inorganic materials has
much to contribute to this exciting, emerging area.

Magnetic semiconductors are an essential component in spin rectification,
and there is great interest in rendering wide band-gap materials such as
ZnO or TiO2 magnetic through suitable substitution. We have followed a
different track in trying to induce dilute ferrimagnetism in wide band-gap
hosts; ZnGa2O4:MFe2O4 solid solutions are magnetic with strongly
hysteretic behaviour at 5 K whilst retaining a relatively large band gap.

The injection of spin requires ferromagnetic half metals; magnetic
systems with electrons in only one spin direction at EF. We have studied
the pyrite system Co1-xFexS2 using a variety of techniques and attempted
to correlate half-metalicity with crystal structure and bonding.

By creating interfaces between different kinds of magnets (eg.
ferromagnets and antiferromagnets, or between soft and hard ferromagnets),
the hysteresis loop can be exchange-biased. We discuss the synthesis,
structure, and magnetism of core-shell ferrite nanoparticles that
reproduce such exchange biasing on the nanometer scale.

26 August 2004

T001
Nanotubes and Nanospheres Under Hydrostatic Pressure; Experimental and Simulation Results

M. S. Amer, Associate Professor of Materials, Wright State University Dayton, OH , USA

21 July 2004

11 am
T001
Micro-Raman Spectroscopy Probing Grain Boundaries and Nano-surfaces

Professor Maher S. Amer, Associate Professor of Materials, Wright State University, Dayton, OH

16th July 2004

11am to 5pm approx
Gonville and Caius sports ground, Newnham Road
CRICKET MATCH: STAFF v STUDENTS

The biggest sporting event of 2004 takes place here! Make sure you register on the team before it's too late. Tickets will be needed for the BBQ, £2 each, available from 01/07/04.
msm cricket

15 July 2004

5 pm
T001
Device Materials Group Seminar: YBCO thin film SQUIDs with gold damping resistors

Dave Pinker

8 July 2004

5 pm
T001
Device Materials Group Seminar: Combinatorial synthesis of functional oxides

Veni Madhav

2 July 2004

11.15
T001
New structures and materials for the Airbus A380 and future Airbus Aircraft

Karl-Heinz Rendigs, Senior Manager, Materials and Processes, Airbus Deutschland GmbH
Gordon Laboratory Events page

1 July 2004

5 pm
T001
Device Materials Group Seminar: Grain boundaries in YBCO

Sibe Mennema

29 June 2004

5 pm
T001
Device Materials Group Seminar: Deposition and Characterisation of bismuth-layered perovskite ferroelectric thin films

Xiaobing Hu

24 June 2004

5 pm
T001
Device Materials Group Seminar: Multiferroic Devices

Wilma Eerenstein

17 June 2004

5 pm
T001
Device Materials Group Seminar: Magnetic semiconducting oxides

Ming Wei

15 June 2004

3 pm
T 001
Radiation Damage in Ceramic Oxides and Minerals: Atomic Scale Processes, Structure, and Bonding

Greg Lumpkin , C3i, Cambridge Centre for Ceramic Immobilisation, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge
Em Group Events

11th June 2004

5pm to 8pm
Darwin College Island
GARDEN PARTY 2004

Tickets go on sale 24/05/04. £5 each. Price includes drinks and BBQ!!

9th June 2004

Afternoon
Babbage lecture theatre
Armourers and Brasiers' Cambridge Forum 2004

Includes the 6th Kelly lecture and the Gordon seminars
Timetable and Registration details

8 June 2004

3 pm
T001
Title to come

Parameswaran Padmanabhan , Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, India
EM Group Events

3 June 2004

5 pm
T001
Device Materials Group Seminar: Device Fabrication and Optimization for Josephson Broadband Spectroscopy of Ferroelectric thin films

Urbasi Sinha

1 June 2004

3 pm
Austin Seminar Room
Optimisation of metal/n-GaN contacts

Grigore Moldovan, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge
EM Group events

28 May 2004

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room
Understanding Mechanical Behaviour of Materials through Indentation and Curvature Measurement Techniques: Some Case Studies

Prof. U. Ramamurty (Department of Metallurgy, Indian Institute of Science)
Gordon Laboratory Events page

27 May 2004

5 pm
T001
Device Materials Group Seminar: Surface-bound low temperature growth of high aspect ratio nanostructures

Stephan Hoffman (Engineering)

26 May 2004

5 pm
T001
Device Materials Group Seminar: Ferroelectric Nanotubes

Finlay Morrison (Earth Sciences)

25 May 2004

3 pm
Austin Seminar Room
Domains behaving badly

John Chapman, University of Glasgow
EM Group Events page

18 May 2004

3 pm
T001
Production and characterisation of NiMn2O4+d films

Dr Rainer Schmidt, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Cambridge
EM Group Events page

14 May

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room, Austin Building
Stress Images from Piezo-Raman and Fluorescence Microspectroscopy

Prof Derek Gardiner (Northumbria University)

12 May 2004

7:00 for 7:30 pm
T001
Cambridge and Anglian Materials Society Meeting: Design and Construction of the London Eye

Dr Allan Mann of the Babtie Group.

Light refreshments from 7.00 pm in the Tea Room; presentation commences at
7.30pm

11 May 2004 (postponed from 2 March)

3 pm
T001
Variants on diffractive imaging

John Rodenburg, University of Sheffield
EM Group Events page

11 May 2004

3 pm
T001
EM Group Seminar: Variants on diffractive imaging

John Rodenburg , Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Sheffield

4 May 2004

4 pm
LR4
'Nanoscale semiconductor structures and high K gate oxides: Materials and Interfaces'

Prof Paul McIntyre, Materials Science and Engineering Dept, Stanford University

30 April 2004

11.15 - 1 pm
Gordon Seminar Room
TBC Seminar Day - a set of 4 seminars starting at 11.15 a.m.

(1) James Curran "Potential for using Keronite Coatings as TBCs". (2) Dr Igor Golosnoy "Modelling of Heat Flow in Plasma Sprayed TBCs". (3) Sofia Tsipas "Measurement of the Thermal Conductivity of Plasma Sprayed TBCs". (4) Shiladitya Paul "Mechanical Characteristics of Plasma Sprayed TBCs".
Abstracts

29 April 2004

5 pm
T001
Device Materials Group Seminar: Life in the arms of a high Tc SQUID

Edward Tarte

22 April 2004

5 pm
T001
Device Materials Group Seminar: Electrical characterisation of NTCR thermistors based on NiMn204+d

Rainer Schmidt, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Cambridge

21 April 2004

7.00 for 7.30 pm
T001
Maximising the Performance of Stainless Steels

Spearker: Chris Baxter of Outokumpu Stainless Ltd

Chris' intention is to cover not simply the materials themselves, but he will also address aspects of the joining characteristics and corrosion behaviour of stainless steels.

Light refreshments from 7.00 pm in the tea room. All welcome. Do come and join us.

2nd April 2004

12:45
Canteen
Departmental BBQ

Tickets on sale from 22/03/04. £2 each. Make sure you arrive promptly to guarantee food!

30 Mar - 1 Apr 2004

Carlton House Terrace,London
Materials Congress 2004

Parallel symposia covering most of the key fields of materials science. Papers are invited. Registration necessary. EPSRC are sponsoring a number of their research students on a first come first served basis.
Details

24 March 2004

7.00 for 7.30 pm
T001
Cambridge and Anglian Materials Society Meeting: The Body Structure of the New Jaguar XJ - A Materials Challenge

Simon Buckingham, Materials Engineering, Jaguar and Land Rover.

Refreshments kindly sponsored by Marshalls of Cambridge, who have also kindly made available a Jaguar XJ for people to look at after the lecture.

All welcome - we look forward to seeing you there.

18 March 2004

5.00 pm
T001
Device Materials Group Seminar: Optical Emission Spectroscopy and Thin Films

Vassilka Tsaneva

18 March 2004

11.30 am
T001
Novel Zinc Alloy Coatings

Professor Martin Stratmann, Max Planck Institut fuer Eisenforschung, Duesseldorf

17 March 2004

11.30 am
T001
Mixing polymers and colloids: the dark hand of entropy

Dr Adriaan A. Louis, Theoretical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge

16 March 2004

3 pm
T001
Microscopy at Nottingham

Paul D Brown, University of Nottingham
EM Group Events page

16 March 2004

3 pm
T001
EM Group Seminars: Microscopy at Nottingham

Paul D Brown , School of Mechanical, Materials, Manufacturing Engineering and Management, University of Nottingham

13 March 2004

2 - 4pm
Level 2 Teaching Laboratory
Cambridge Science Festival: SeeKing Science

Can you pass the SeeK challenge? Bring along your family and join SeeK for hands-on fun activities. Create your own kaleidoscope, smash eggs, and find out how to make a lemon-powered clock!
Just drop in anytime. Aimed at families with children ages 7-11, though suitable for all.
SeeK Website

13 March 2004

10am til noon
King College - Front Lawn (by the chapel)
Cambridge Science Festival: Raging Rockets

Want to jump up and down on Kings College lawn! Come and join SeeK and build your own water-powered rocket, and launch your creation on the front lawn at Kings College.
Aimed at families with children aged 7-11, but suitable for all.
*In the event of bad weather we will not be holding this event*
SeeK Website

12 March 2004

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room
Gordon Laboratory Seminar Series: Physical Metallurgy of Multi-phase Steel for Improved Passenger Car Crash-worthiness

Prof Bruno De Cooman (Ghent University, Belgium)
Gordon Laboratory Events page

12 March 2004

from 1.45 pm
T001
MPhil Materials Modelling students will give presentations on their Literature Reviews

11 March 2004

5.00 pm
T001
Device Materials Group Seminar: Vortices at YBa2Cu3O7+d grain boundaries

John Durrell

5 March 2004

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room
Gordon Laboratory Seminar Series: (1) Numerical Magneto-Mechanical Stimulation of Bone Growth in a Bonded Array of Ferromagnetic Fibres. (2) Resistance welding of thin stainless steel sandwich sheets with fibrous metallic cores - An experimental and numer

Dr Anthina Markaki and Jin-Chong Tan (Gordon Laboratory)
Gordon Laboratory Events page

4 March 2004

5.00 pm
T001
Device Materials Group Seminar: Ferromagnetism in AlN thin films

Dinesh Kumar

4th of March 2004

4.00 p.m.
T001
Macromolecular Materials Lab Seminar: “A novel aerosol method for single walled carbon nanotube synthesis ”

Prof. Esko I. Kauppinen (from Helsinki University of Technology, Finland)

3 March 2004

Evening
T001
Cambridge and Anglian Materials Society heat of IoMMM National Lecture Competition

As in the past, there are two different categories of entrant at this stage
of the competition: one group below the age of 22 (normally undergraduates)
and the other group below the age of 28 (normally postgraduates). Winners
of this heat will go forward to a Regional Competition to be held in London
later in March.If any student is interested to enter the competition, then please contact
Dr Serena Best (smb51@hermes.cam.ac.uk) for more details and an entry form.

2 March 2004

3.00 pm
T001
Electron tomography in the physical sciences: Theory, practice and applications

Dr Matthew Weyland of the Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy.
EM Group Events page

27 February 2004

10.45 am (note earlier time)
Gordon Seminar Room
Gordon Laboratory Seminar Series: (1) Numerical Modelling and Experimental Studies of Transient Liquid Phase Phenomena. (2) Thermo-mechanical characteristics of bulk and highly porous shape memory alloy

Tom Illingworth and Jamie Muir Wood (Gordon Laboratory)
Gordon Laboratory Events page

26 February 2004

5.00 pm
T001
Device Materials Group Seminar: Piezoresponse Force Microscopy of ferroelectric thin films

Paul Roberts

24th Febuary 2004

12:30 to 14:00 approx
Canteen
MSM PUB QUIZ

Register your team now for the toughest quiz in the land. Register at Reception or Accounts. £2 per person, teams of no more than 4 people.

20 February 2004

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room
Gordon Laboratory Seminar Series: K-MAPPING (TM) - for the Capture and Management of Technological Information and Knowledge

Dr Ricky Ricks (Innoval Technology Ltd)
Gordon Laboratory Events page

19 February 2004

5.00 pm
T001
Device Materials Group Seminar: Controlling stripes in manganites

Susan Cox

17 February 2004

3.00 pm
T001
Managing pressure: Indents, twins and multilayers

Stephen J Lloyd
EM Group Events page

13 February 2004

2 pm (NOTE CHANGED TIME))
Gordon Seminar Room
Gordon Laboratory Seminar Series: Indentation's better half: a closer look at the data collected during loading

Dr Luc Vandeperre (Gordon Laboratory)
Gordon Laboratory Events page

12 February 2004

5.00 pm
T001
Device Materials Group Seminar: Chemical synthesis; sol-gel route to YBCO

Tarek Mouganie

6 February 2004

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room
Gordon Laboratory Seminar Series: Keronite Plasma Electrolytic Oxide Coatings

James Curran (Gordon Laboratory)
Gordon Laboratory Events page

5 February 2004

5.00 pm
T001
Device Materials Group Seminar: Coated Conductors : Fabrication, modelling and measurement

Noel Rutter

3 February 2004

3pm
T001
EM Group Seminar: Growth and characterisation of gallium nitride-based quantum dots

Rachel A Oliver, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge
EM Group Events page

30 January 2004

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room
Gordon Laboratory Seminar Series: (1) Materials and Electrodes. (2) Erosion-corrosion of coatings and bulk surfaces

Prof. Derek Pletcher and Dr Robert Wood (University of Southampton)
Gordon Laboratory Events page

29 January 2004

5.00 pm
T001
Device Materials Group Seminar: Superconductors for DC and AC applications

Bartek Glowacki

29 January 2004

2 pm
T001
Modelling of defects in graphite

Dr Ahlam El-Barbary (University of Sussex)

28 January 2004

7.00 for 7.30
Dept. of MSM
CAMBRIDGE AND ANGLIAN MATERIALS SOCIETY "Discovering flexible chocolate: an unusual science but a sweet success"

Prof. Malcolm Mackley, Dept of Chemical Engineering, University of Cambridge .
More details : e-mail - geoff.hale@pem.cam.ac.uk

23 January 2004

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room
Gordon Laboratory Seminar Series: Hierarchical Materials and Structures (FEMS Lecture)

Dr Paul Weaver (Bristol University)
Gordon Laboratory Events page

22 January 2004

5.00 pm
T001
Device Materials Group Seminar: High K oxides for future CMOS

John Robertson (Engineering)

16 January 2004

11.15 am
Gordon Seminar Room
Gordon Laboratory Seminar Series: New aluminium foams

Dave Curran (Gordon Laboratory)
Gordon Laboratory Events page

15 January 2004

2.00 pm
T001
Macromolecular Materials Lab Seminar: Raman Spectroscopy on Carbon nanotubes

Stephanie Reich (Engineering)

15 January 2004

5.00 pm
T001
Device Materials Group Seminar: Creating nanostructures for novel applications using focused ion/electron beams

Dae-Joon Kang (Nanoscience)

13 January 2004

6 - 7 pm
Lecture Theatre 1, Judge Institute of Management (note change of venue)
ENTERPRISE TUESDAY "How to write a business plan"

Walter Herriot, Director of St John's Innovation Centre

17 December 2003

11.30am
Babbage Lecture Theatre
Annual Meeting of the Department

11 December 2003

8pm to 12pm
University Sports and Social club
MSM Christmas Party 2003

9 December 2003

2pm
T001
EM Group Seminar: A double-Cs-corrected TEM/ STEM and its applications in materials science

John L Hutchison, Department of Materials, Oxford
EM Group Events page

4 December 2003

9.30am
T001
Labview training session

3 December 2003

7.00 for 7.30
G3 Conference Room, Bevan Braithwaite Building, TWI LTD, Granta Park, Abington. If anyone needs transport contact geoff.hale@pem.cam.ac.uk
CAMBRIDGE AND ANGLIAN MATERIALS SOCIETY: "Why Weld? You could use Adhesives!" Adhesives are used extensively to join metals, polymers, composites and ceramics for a broad range of structural applications.

Speaker: Anita Buxton, Polymer Technology Section, TWI Ltd.
Map showing location.

27 November 2003

5.00 pm
T001
Device Materials Group Seminar: Geometrically driven ferroelectricity in hexagonal manganites

Speaker: Bas van Aken

26 November 2003

11.30 am
Pfizer Institute meeting room
Recent Developments in Cardiac Dynamics

CCMM seminar: Hana Dobrovolny, Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina

19 November 2003

7.00 for 7.30
Conference Centre, TWI, Granta Park, Abington, Cambs
CAMBRIDGE AND ANGLIA MATERIALS SOCIETY: Eclipse 500 - An affordable, luxurious six place, twin-turbofan aircraft - friction stir welded

The highly innovative Eclipse 500 employs Friction Stir Welding
(FSW) as an enabler to manufacturing a jet selling for ¼ the cost of
the lowest priced twinjet on the market. FSW assemblies on the first
ever friction stir welded aircraft include the cabin, cockpit, aft
fuselage and wings.

3 - 9 November 2003

European Science and Technology Week
Details

22 October 2003

7.00
T001
Millennium Bridge: The Modification Works. Jill Baker

Cambridge and Anglian Materials Society: Jill Baker is a civil engineer, with a background in bridges and steel
structures. She was the project manager responsible for the
implementation of the modification works to the Millennium Bridge
during 2001, through to commissioning and opening in February
2002.

19 October 2003

4.15 p.m.
T001
Numerical Simulations Of Uniaxial Compression And Decompression Of Polydisperse Systems Of Elastoplastic Spheres

Dr Colin Thornton, University of Birmingham, UK

29 July 2003

11.30
T001
Self-assembly of Unconstrained Colloidal Mono-crystals (SCUM)

A lecture by David Brandon, the very well known internationally renowned scientist who is also an excellent lecturer.

18 July 2003

11.00am start
Gonville and Caius sports ground
MSM Staff and Student Cricket Match

24 June 2003

10.00am - 4.30pm
T001
Materials Education Workshop

Organised by DoITPoMS with UKCME and MATTER
Details and registration

23 June 2003

all day
T001 and Austin Lecture Room
Graduate Students' Seminar Day

20 June 2003

11.30 am
T001
The promise of sweet reason: 50 years of Alan Cottrell's Dislocations and Plastic Flow in Crystals

A lecture by Professor Mick Brown of the Department of Physics, University of Cambridge to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the publication of Professor Sir Alan Cottrell's book "Dislocations and Plastic Flow in Crystals".

13 June 2003

5.00pm - 8.00pm
Darwin island
Materials Science and Metallurgy Garden Party

12 June 2003

All day
Babbage Lecture Theatre and Podium
Department of Materials Science Open Day

Posters, seminars, and the Kelly Lecture
Details

3 June 2003

7 for 7.30pm
Pippard Lecture Theatre, Cavendish Laboratories, Madingley Road
The first Cambridge and Anglian Materials Society lecture

The lecture is entitled "Pretty, Pretty, Bang Bang!: The Science of Fireworks and Explosives" and will be presented by Jackie Akhavan of the Royal Military College of Science. The lecture will be suitable for a wide audience including school-age children of around 15 or above. Light refreshments from 7.00pm

16 May 2003

7 pm for 7.30
Wordsworth Room, St John's College
Cambridge and Anglian Material Society Annual Dinner

All welcome.
Details

15 May 2003

12.30pm
Tea Room
Department Quiz

14 May 2003

7.00pm for 7.30pm
T001
IOM3 Seminar: Metallugical Meditations - a Historical Perspective

Prof Jim Charles, Dept Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge

9 April 2003

7.00pm for 7.30pm
T001
IOM3 Seminar: Patent Infringement: Is Imitation the Sincerest Form of Flattery?

Dr Peter Lewis, The Open University

14 - 22 March 2003

Cambridge Science Festival

Exploring science, mathematics, engineering and technology. Sessions in the Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy on Saturday 14 March.
Details

12 March 2003

7.00pm for 7.30pm
T001
IOM3 Seminar: Hypothesis: Lighter Materials in Tennis Rackets Cause more Injury?

Dr Allison Cooke, Cooke Associates

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